Return to the Appliances Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Range hood recommendation

Posted by twitter007 (My Page) on
Thu, Mar 29, 12 at 17:34

I currently have a cooktop with downdraft and it's horrible. Planning to add an undercabinet range hood and looking for some recommendations. I don't have a fixed budget but hoping to find something nice for around $1000. It needs to be at least 600 CFM and have to the capability to be vented from back.

I think vent-a-hood fits nicely in my price range but found mixed reviews on it. Some folks think it's too hard to clean and technology behind it is over-rated.

Also, appreciate some pointers on places to buy in San Francisco Bay area.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I am curious of what everyone recommends also. We are getting ready to break ground for our home-- looking at either a range top or a range. Hoping The Blue Star RCS is something we can get.

Read that Modernaire is good choice--but I have no clue how much?


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

New here and in the same situation. I'm looking for 1000 cfm (not 1400 cfms, which a lot of Pro line seem to sell in blowers/fans and which would definitely highly impact make up air need, not that 1000 cfm is small, its just what we currently have and we've been fine). At 600 cfms, you should have a wide selection of rear backing vent hoods.

As already mentioned, a good way to search for your needs is through ajmadison.com (not connencted) or other online appliance co., as you can check box your desires (like cfms, wall vent, width, price range etc) and then proceed to read the specs to see if it back vents.

From what I see, Modernaire is a semi and custom line, pricey and beautiful. Doubt anything less than $2k, but could be off.

Hope this helps. Good luck.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Many people are happy with Kobe hoods. I can't speak from personal experience but that's what I'd be looking at if I needed a new hood. Get one with baffles not oil catchers.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I am also looking for a 600 or so cfm range hood to go over a new DCS, so thanks for starting this thread. Just wondering what are baffles vs. oil catchers. Also, are slides outs okay in general?


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Although I have a Wolf hood made by Independent, many here operating in the higher flow rate regions have had good results from ModernAire. Reportedly they will build to order so odd-ball size requirements are not a problem. A search of the forum will turn up additional information.

kas


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I have a Viking with heat lamp. I'd give a lot of thought to the idea of putting a 42" hood over a 36" range. While that may have some popularity in this forum it's a fairly unusual configuration and one you likely may not need with a range unless you are mounting a hood higher than normal. Cabinet placement could impact that as well.
Before you select an appropriate CFM consider having a qualified installer come look at your home.
The length of your exhaust run, the diameter of the venting and how many turns in the exhaust can have a dramatic impact on the CFM you need. Every 90 degree turn in your exhaust venting results in a substantial loss of CFM.
If you want quiet get the external blower. FWIW my Viking hood is now 12 years old and never a single problem. (knocks on wood)
Width is not nearly as important as depth (IMO) in your hood. Unfortunately you may have to go wider than your range to get a deeper hood.
Enjoy the new kitchen!


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Thanks to everyone for their input. I'm trying to figure out what will look best in my kitchen, a under-cabinet hood or a wall-mount hood.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/11255303@N02/7033136853/

Distance between cooktop and bottom of dish rack above is only 27 inches. Even if I find a 9" high low -profile hood, I'll still need to modify the cabinet by removing either the dish rack or the decorative piece on top it. If I go with a wall-mount, then I can just remove the cabinet altogether but not sure if look good.

Here is a link that might be useful: Kichen pic


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

You might consider having a hood insert built that fit inside a wood structure that integrated with and continued the present style of cabinetry.

kas


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Thanks Kas. That's exactly what my wife wants. These are KraftMaid cabinets which were most likely ordered through Home Depot. I should probably go talk to them to see if I can order a hood insert.

Also, I searched but didn't find any hood inserts which vented in the back. Does anybody know of one?


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I would ask Home Depot for an insert with SS baffles filters as opposed to mesh filters much better long term.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I watched a Pro Line video installation recently and perhaps this is worth considering for you. I want an exterior fan/blower system. This is in-line. ProLine's corporate office is in Salt Lake City. The smallest undercabinet is 30" yet both offer the low profile you seek.

Here is a link that might be useful: Under Cabinet Pro-line 36


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Trevor (the CC guy at euro-stoves) has the exclusive contract on Modern Aire on the web - so you could call him for prices. I think modern air 42 inch is in the $3,000 range. I have been told you need 42 inch hood over a 36 inch range if you are putting it in an island or are installing a grill. But, you should fact check this with an expert. I have heard Farber is good and more reasonably priced, but don't have any experience with it.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

More precisely, the hood size has to encompass the rising and expanding effluent from the pots and pans (not the stove top area). The effluent may be simply thought of as expanding at a 45-degree total angle (22.5-degree half angle) from every point on the hot pan surfaces. (For gas burners, include a little more diameter for the combustion products passing around the pot or pan.)

The higher the hood the larger the aperture should be. A simple diagram drawn by straight edge and protractor from a front view and side view will reveal the desirable size in lieu of calculating it using trigonometry.

At high flow rates, the effective aperture may be _slightly_ larger due to air flow around the hood edge. Also, a wall behind the cooking surface and cabinets at the sides will somewhat duct the rising effluent and allow a reduction in the size of the aperture.

kas


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Futuro Futuro makes inserts that can be vented back.

Here is a link that might be useful: insert


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

We really like our Kobe wall-mount chimney hood, which checks all your boxes (or at least it did when we bought it a year ago...) They make a number of versions of it, though I'm not sure if inserts are among them.

For places to buy it, depending on where in the Bay Area you are, we've been happy with Galvin Appliance in Albany over the years. Airport also carries a wide range of hoods, but I've never been able to nail down a good salesperson there to answer questions (supposedly there are some, so that may just have been bad luck on my part...)


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I have the Zephyr 2100 hood (from Galvin Appliance) which I think fills all your specs. I wrote a full review on it last year, here's the link.

Here is a link that might be useful: Zephyr AK2100 rangehood


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

We bought the Kobe CH2230SQB after much research. It is a 720CFM 30" undercabinet hood, can vent out the back, has baffle filters. They make a 36" too. I'd love to tell you how we like it, but it was just shipped to us and we're still awaiting installation. Based on all the research and reviews we looked at, we expect to love it. We ordered through AJMadison but kept getting told 'another two weeks until it ships' and eventually canceled our order with them. I called Kobe for advice on who to buy from and they directed me to www.thenaturalhome.com , who were super-great to work with. It shipped out the next day.

Here is a link that might be useful: Kobe CH2230SQB


 o
also...

Meant to mention that the Kobe is in the $700's, so within your price range.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

KOBE hoods SUCK!!! I would not recommend one. Spent over a $1k for a 30" hood and it crapped out (No power, totally dead) just after the 2 year manufactures warranty. Contacted the company would not help me out at all. Numerous phone calls and emails and still nothing. They do not stand behind their products!


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Millenium signed up to the GW today. Not much detail given other than the power is dead. There could be many reasons for the power to go out, having nothing to do with the quality of the hood.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Zephyr here too (current place). Getting a Zephyr hood insert in our new build also since they are so wonderful, trouble free and super quiet! Can't recommend them enough.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Couple of questions to piggy back onto this informative thread as I am also struggling with the large selection of range hoods.

Depth?
Lots of love for Kobe goods on these forums and I thought I had narrowed it down to CH-191SQB-1. Then I read a post that a depth of less than 24" is not good as it misses the effluent from the front burners. Every Kobe range hood I have looked at is 22"

Optimal ducting.
I'm looking at under cabinet installation. What is better (quieter and more efficient) a vertical round duct (the Kobe I'm looking at is 6") that goes into the cabinet above then makes a 90 degree elbow and vents out the back wall or a rectangular horizontal duct (3 1/4 x 10") straight out the back wall.

Lighting: halogen vs LED
Anyone with personal experience with LED lights? All of Kobe's new model hoods have switched to LED. We actually prefer the look/shape of some of the older discontinued hoods that are discontinued but still available online for purchase but they all have the old halogen lights. Also other brands that have hoods in 24" depth all have halogen lighting. Is this a big step down from the newer LED lighting?


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Led option is 100.00 I got the base unit for 633. From natural home
Halogen lights are warmer and lights require replacement more often.

This post was edited by jolb57 on Thu, Oct 3, 13 at 9:54


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Round ducts with the same cross-sectional area as square ducts have less pressure loss per unit length. A 3-1/4 x 10 has a sectional area of 32.5 square inches, whereas a 6-inch diameter duct has a sectional area of 9pi square inches, slightly less. But for use over a short distance, the hood transitions and baffle loss will be greater, not to mention the pressure drop from imperfect MUA.

kas


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Kas so what would be the loss with a 10 ft run of relatively straight exhaust at 6 inches given the manufacturer says 800 cfm with 6 inch outlet. No other parameters?


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

Kas, for those of us less mechanically/physics inclined - you are saying the round duct is better per unit length than the rectangular duct? What about the 90 deg turn required for the round duct?

How would you choose to vent a hood given the options of 6" round vertical with a 90 deg bend toward the back wall vs rectangular horizontal ducting straight out the back wall?

It seems to me that the shorter, straighter duct run of the the rectangular horizontal option might overcome the preferential flow dynamics of the round vertical to horizontal option.


 o
RE: Range hood recommendation

I was reporting that round duct with the same cross-sectional area as a rectangular duct has slightly lower pressure loss per unit length. If the ducts are not equal, then one or the other may be slightly lower loss. Duct pressure loss calculators exist at various sites on-line and may be used to gain some perspective.

If I could go straight with rectangular then I probably would use it. As I noted above, the duct losses of either approach are very likely not the dominant losses that determine cfm performance. And here we are addressing the difference in two cases of non-dominant losses, so it is of even less concern.

Use the one that is easiest to install and easiest to maintain. If ducting is going to be hidden in walls or ceilings then I suggest running the system and testing for rattles and vibration, and adding damping material as needed before closing up the duct cavity.

kas


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Appliances Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here