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CC boil timing

Posted by aliris19 (My Page) on
Wed, Mar 28, 12 at 1:29

Someone asked at some point how long it did take for that gonzo burner to heat water. I actually mostly wanted to know how much water fit into my pasta pot tonight so I did the experiment, sort of.

I figured out the pot holds 1 gallon of water. It's 5" high x 8.5" diameter - aluminum, probably; it's cheap. On the "high" setting of the CC the flame licks a little bit up around the side. That may not be the most efficient way to heat the water, therefore. But for the sake of argument I left it at that setting. The lid is also aluminum and domed a bit and there's one of those shutters on it for releasing steam. It was closed but it doesn't shut air-tight by any means.

I had to keep opening the lid of course to see if it was boiling. And this test completely begs the question of what is boiling and boiling temperature; I don't know. I started it from room temperature -- whatever that is in socal on a cold day about 3 miles and 80 feet elevation from the ocean. Ventilation was on full blast, I think -- not positive I remember that right. It was certainly on, full I'm not certain of.

So I think it took 12.5 minutes to come to a full boil. ish. For a gallon is that reasonable? I was pretty surprised, frankly, at how long that took. I would want to do the experiment a few more times before asserting that is correct. And also play with the flame and try it on different burners, different placements.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: CC boil timing

Doesn't sound all that long to me but there are so many variables, one of which will definately give you better performance, and that is a larger diameter vessle.

If you want to boil water fast on a gas stove for thing like tea or coffee, I don't think anything can beat (on gas) a simplex windsor copper kettle for gas stoves. I boil half a gallon in minutes.


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RE: CC boil timing

I'll bite.

Vollrath 4.5qt 18 gauge SS pan, about 8.5" wide and 4" tall with matching lid.

12 cups tepid-ish water (as full as is I was adding dry pasta at boil)
Front center burner
600cfm hood on low (2 speeds and I couldn't face using high this late)

Full, rolling boil at 8:18

I live just above sea level near the Puget Sound.


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RE: CC boil timing

Um, OK ... 12 cups = (12*8) = 96 oz; 1 gal = 4qt = 4(4*8) = 128 oz ... is that correct? -- So this is 75% as much water (duh, which could have been realized in many faster ways). So you'd expect 9.4 minutes, and you have a larger-bottomed pan by far so this seems approximately as expectedly-same. so to speak.


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RE: CC boil timing

FWIW, here are a couple of things you might like to see. I can't give this first one any credence though, because there is not one controlled variable. It has been posted a few times on these boards.

http://applianceadvisor.com/content/peoples-cooktop-test

The pot you are using as the interface is a huge part of the equation. Of course you want to have the burner adjusted properly as well. A simple thing is to use a wider pan to capture more of the heat on the higher settings. I have used a skillet to heat water to make a small amount of pasta when in a hurry.;-)
Here is an interesting article about capturing heat in a pot.

Another interesting site is "Cooking for Engineers"

You've got the BTUs and you can put them on steroids with the right pan!

Here is a link that might be useful: Improving Range-Top Efficiency with Specialized Vessels


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RE: CC boil timing

Well that's fun -- not sure I have the fortitude for going through it though! While I agree nothing's controlled, it is interesting to see how many variables might potentially want to be controlled. Whew... pain.

In the end my water boiling is hardly ever a rate-limiting step, so I don't think I'll be delving terribly much deeper into this. Someone had posted wanting the info a while back; just trying to oblige. Truthfully it's not really a - ahem - burning, but rather, perhaps, simmering issue, as it were, for me!

How on earth could you keep those fins on the bottom of the pots clean? Interesting for sure, but practical? What if you put the fins on the grate and not the pot? Might be functionally equivalent (maybe not in terms of heat transfer, but only in terms of 'capturing/focusing' the heat), sort of, easier to keep clean and less yucky?


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RE: CC boil timing

OMG! OMG! These are already on the market!

Where can I buy a Turbo Pot?


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RE: CC boil timing

I remember buying something by that name when I was in college...


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RE: CC boil timing

Did you find it shortened your baking times?


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RE: CC boil timing

... and does it inform your moniker?


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RE: CC boil timing

Found the answer. They're available at Dvorsons online

Now I definitely want to see comparisons between CC, BS and lower BTU burners using these pots!!


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RE: CC boil timing

Ha! You can "like" them on facebook!

Here is a link that might be useful: Turbo Pots


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RE: CC boil timing

Not counting lost heat radiated as the pot gets hotter, you are going to need about 1200BTU to raise 1 gallon of water from about 60F to 212F. Maybe 60% of the heat is going around the pot, so that means you need to consume enough gas to make maybe 3000BTU. You also have to heat your aluminum pot -- if the part getting heated weight 2.5 pounds, that brings you up to a bit over 3200BTU required (plus radiated loss). You also have to heat up the grate the burner sits on.

12.5 minutes @ 18000BTU/hr is 3750BTU, so pretty close to expectation, and on the correct side. The 40% efficiency is a number I've seen, but it can't be absolute and will vary with pot size for a given burner. That low efficiency of heat delivered to the pot is why the room heats up much more with gas than with induction or regular electric burners.


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RE: CC boil timing

I just ordered a Turbo Pot. I'll report back when it comes via UPS and I try it out.


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RE: CC boil timing

Cooking vessels certainly matter, but the glaring omission here is starting temp! Aliris doesn't specify, Breezy says "tepid-ish."

On my CC, it took close to 15 minutes for a full gallon to come to a rolling boil (8" diameter aluminum pot), but my starting temp was cold tap water - 46 deg.

Dictionary.com defines tepid as "moderately warm, lukewarm." All of which are subjective, so I chose room temp - defined (by me) as 70 deg - to bring 3 quarts to a boil like Breezy did. 8:40.


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RE: CC boil timing

stumpedfood: Them's fighting words! "I started it from room temperature -- whatever that is in socal on a cold day about 3 miles and 80 feet elevation from the ocean" So OK, that's not very precise. It was low 60's during the day, nighttime had fallen, but the water had probably not dropped appreciably in temperature. I didn't measure it but ... but, well at first I thought you didn't either; now I'm thinking "46 deg" is an actual measurement from you.

Kidding aside, I agree, though, that it's important - I think any or all of these starting conditions might matter ... if there were anything we were actually testing. I was only giving a vague sense of what was going on; someone asked.

It's helpful to cess out all the variables to try to control should someone actually want to do this experiment right. That includes minutiae like calibrating and standardizing thermometers and measurement techniques and maybe air pressure? and standardizing vessels ... all pretty silly if for no other reason than: what are we testing?


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RE: CC boil timing

Oops, Aliris, I'm sorry - I didn't pick up on that you were describing the water temperature!


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