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New Verona range

Posted by vedazu (My Page) on
Fri, Jan 3, 14 at 21:51

I begin by saying that I have a Lacanche in my main home in NJ. I have now a second house in MN that I am remodeling a bit--especially the kitchen. I love enameled stoves, but my budget for this renovation is limited--I'm lucky to have found a good carpenter who has turned my old, simple birch cabinets into something quite pretty. So, having said that, I looked a long time at the options available to me at the price point I could afford: 2K would have been nice, but I could stretch it to 3K. I ordered the Verona in bisque from AJ Madison and two poor guys delivered it in 30 below zero weather last week. It was hooked up two days ago and I took it for a big test drive, roasting, baking and using the cooktop. It doesn't have the physical weight of the Lacanche, which is a bit of a tank, but it is a good solid, well made and beautiful --slightly contemporary--range. The burners are all responsive, the middle one comes with a wok ring, there is plenty of power and I think you can cook up quite a storm on this stove. I know there will be a learning curve because like all gas ovens, the temperatures are a bit vague. Each burner has its own ignition, unlike the Lacanche, where you have to hold down a button while turning the knob to ignite. There is a fan in the oven, lovely stainless top, and I have to admit that the oven racks are only a million percent better than the Lacanche. But we knew that. The grates are not as heavy as Lacanche , but very substantial and although they aren't advertised as continuous grates, they really are, exactly as the Lacanche.
Not quite sure why this well priced, pretty range hasn't taken off. We'll see how it holds up when I get a longer time to work with it, but so far, I'm very happy. By the way, the bisque color is quite ivory, and in the daylight looks pale yellow. Very pretty color but not completely neutral--you should see it before you choose paint colors.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: New Verona range

Thank you so much for posting this review! I am getting a 36" Verona for my remodel, and there isn't a ton of information on it. I am considering the two oven option. Glad to read positive feedback.


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RE: New Verona range

I would have liked the two oven option, but had to hold the fort on the price. The one oven is gigantic, especially after having lived with the two smaller Lacanche ovens for so many years. I did end up cooking several things at one time in the Verona--just have to adjust my cooking style when I'm at that house.


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RE: New Verona range

Nice of you to do this vedazu. I already have my range bought, but had looked at Verona as an option. I couldn't find much information on them, so didn't think about them for too long. There are probably others considering it & your opinion may change someones mind on whether or not to buy. Someone else did this w/ the Whirlpool Refrigerator for about a year, I believe. I thought it was great to put out that much experience with it because most reviews are from people that just had the appliance installed. What we need the most is longevity with an appliance to get the real story. I plan on putting information on my appliances after I install & use them. Please come back every so few months to let us know how it keeps up. Thank you for the information. It's a pretty range & I hope it gives you many years of great cooking.


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RE: New Verona range

Thanks for the review. Is this a duel fuel, with electric oven?


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RE: New Verona range

vedazu - I forgot to ask, what hood did you go with? I am trying to decide size and CFM.

pumpkinhouse - yes, duel fuel. That is why I am picking this over the Bertazzoni. The less expensive Bert is all gas, and the more expensive Bert is twice the cost of the Vernoa.


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RE: New Verona range

Pumpkinhouse: I got all gas--for the price. If I can only have one oven, I prefer to have gas since I probably won't do much baking, but roasting meats and birds. I like gas for that.
Rebecca: I'm getting a Ventahood--staying under the MN required make-up air point--doing 300cfm. Also have a casement window near the stove that leads to an enclosed (unheated) porch that isn't tight, so if I need to, I have more options.


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RE: New Verona range

What size did you get? 36" or 42" Thanks! (last question) :)


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Thanks for your post , since my wife saw this Verona model #VEFSGE365SS......36" Pro-Style Dual-Fuel Range with 5 Sealed Burners, 4.0 cu. ft. European Convection Oven, Multi Function Oven, Digital Clock/Timer and Storage Drawer in Stainless Steel she loved it, I found some reviews that were positive , I am glad to share your input with her , this should make our decision much easier, I wish we all would share our experiences this way , making useful reviews helps those of us who are on the fence , thanks

Here is a link that might be useful: Euro-chef Verona range


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RE: New Verona range

I just had my dual fuel Verona range with the two ovens delivered today. It's not hooked up yet, so no report on how it cooks. Like everyone else I was hesitant on the lack of reviews, but I had an odd space, replacing an old Frigedaire Flair, and I have very small doors into the kitchen. I needed countertop depth, and I was already well equipped with small pans.

I'll let people know about the cooking after I get it working.

Lost


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RE: New Verona range

Rebecca--if the question was for me, I got the 36".


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RE: New Verona range

Verona Range Review: (dual fuel 36 inch with two ovens)

When I opted to purchase this range, I found almost no reviews and looking at it jammed among dozen of ranges in the showroom wasn't all that helpful. I've been cooking on a vintage Frigidaire Flaire which was fun to look at, but had only one temperature burn. Obviously this review will be colored by my last stove experience.

The Good:
The stove is pretty in a sleek understated way and fits in my mostly mid-century kitchen.

I'm ecstatic about the ovens. I've never owned an oven that cooks evenly and both are perfect. I thought golden brown cornbread was a myth until I used this stove. I'm so in love with an oven that can be used to do more than burn frozen pizza that I've made a cake and two loafs of bread. Cooked the bread on two cookie sheets on two racks using convection. They cooked to a completely matching color and doneness.

The burners seem responsive, and the simmer seems doable, but I haven't tried anything super delicate. The grates are sturdy and my pans sit very level. For sealed burners the cooking seems very even. The knobs are big and easy to turn and feel solid.

It doesn't have a bunch of digital stuff and is simple to operate.

Heat doesn't pour from the oven door when you open it.

Things to Think About:
The ovens are small. I knew this going in, but for some that's a deal stopper. The lack of depth and height may not be obvious in the pictures.

A fan runs continuously when the ovens are on. It's not loud, but these aren't silent ovens.

The oven light is on whenever the oven is on which is actually probably a good feature as after the oven reaches temperature, there is no red light to indicate the oven is working.

The knobs for the burners turn counter clockwise, but for the oven clockwise.

The burners require large pans. The advantages and disadvantages of open versus sealed burners have been beat to depth, but as a sealed system big pans are needed to have the heat above medium. Flame is moving to the outside with ten inch pans.

The temperature on the oven knobs are a direct conversion from Celsius and won't match the common numbers found in cookbooks. The knob has a 440 instead of a 450 for example. No big deal, but might bother some.

The knobs must be held in for a few seconds after lighting the burners as a safety feature. (I like this, but it's different than other stoves I've used.)

The manual is badly translated from Italian.

My contractors said it was hard to get level. I can't say if that's a function and older house or the stove.

The ovens have rubber gaskets around the doors that don't look super sturdy.

The oven doors on mine hang at about a one millimeter slant. (minor but irritating)

Over all I'm very happy with my new toy.

This post was edited by lostinohio67 on Sun, Jan 12, 14 at 23:36


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RE: New Verona range

Thank you for the in depth review! Since this range is counter depth, is it possible to fit five large pans on it at once?
Please update when you've had a chance to cook something on a low simmer.


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Tiny follow up:

There is plenty of room to fit five pans on the range top as long as they all don't have long handles since it's a configuration of 2 burners on either side and one in the middle. As for the simmer, a tiny pan of something super delicate is not going to happen without using a simmer plate. The flame failure device prevents the burners from going to their lowest unless you intentionally turn the knobs the opposite direction which can be done with some of them. With the flame failure set up, I would call the outside burners more low than simmer and the middle burner simmer for a large pan, spaghetti sauce or soup, but not melting chocolate or the like. I've made soup and spaghetti sauce without a problem, but I'm also practiced on my old stove that would scorch onions instantly on the lowest burner setting.


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how do you know when the oven has reached the desired temperature? i put an oven therm. in the oven itself but i have to keep checking it. am i missing something? seems like an obvious feature. also, do you find it really loud? thanks for any help you can provide. i'm stumped!!!!


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I have no idea! I just wait until it seems like it ought to be ready! Seriously, I will just need to get an oven thermometer up there. I' m not sure any gas ovens tell you when they are at the correct temperature--unless you just listen to hear of the gas cycles off?


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I have the dual fuel range. A red light goes off on mine when it has come to temperature.


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haha, I'm reading all this because I'm interested in possibly a Verona, and I'm so happy there is a great thread about it! I'm also looking at the Berta and the GE Monogram (and now maybe the Electrolux Icon). But the thing I'm smiling about is that I'm assuming you are all so much younger than I am!! My old Magic Chef is just like all the other ovens I grew up with. And the good news is that you don't need any readouts or gadgets (other than a thermometer if you REALLY are insecure about the oven not reaching the right temp or the oven is new and you are still trying to see how accurate it is). You just preheat it for 10 or 15 min. That's it. That's what they've been doing since ovens were invented, I think. :) It's not really rocket science, so don't stress yourself over it!! I'm a big baker (and if I might say so, a really good one at that) and I've never had trouble. Yes, I know my current oven runs a little hot, so I tweak it about 15-25 degrees when baking, and I usually check it about 5 min prior to the stated cook time, but other than that, all is always good. In fact, the idea that I read so many reviews in which people comment on this "lack" of a feature worries me. Does this mean that newer ovens are really unreliable? Has something changed over the years? Because baking something (unless it's a soufflé or a Baked Alaska or something) isn't going to change a ton if the temp is off a little bit. Just a cute piece of trivia to show how spoiled we've all become by modern technology -- in my grandmother's day, her oven had three temps - "slow", "medium", and "hot". she knew it was the temp she needed based on how long she could tolerate the heat when she stuck her arm in the oven. My advice is don't fret over the little stuff when there's already so many things to consider when purchasing an oven. Wishing everyone well and lots of luck in your decisions! :)


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RE: New Verona range

Does anybody have any more info or experience to share on their Verona ranges? I am considering purchasing one - I need a 36" range and probably will go with all gas, although I was considering dual fuel for a long time. Finally decided I don't want to break the bank on buying a GE Monogram, Thermador or Wolf. Have come back full circle to Verona after looking at them 2 years ago! Would love to get more opinions from those that purchased Verona. Thanks!


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Can any Verona owners comment specifically on how powerful the broiler is? Someone said it's 'anemic' but how many BTUs do you really need from a broiler? I can't find any good numbers out there. But my old stove had a kick-butt broiler that would broil chicken like you wouldn't believe - you had to keep the pan at least 9 or 10 inches away from the heat and it would cook hot and fast and make the skin golden and crispy. I want to know if the Verona can do the same. This broiler issue, along with the 'no small pans on the cooktop' are the two things keeping me from going ahead and making this purchase.


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Hi Vedazu:

Any updates on your Verona range, after 10 months of use? What do you like? and do not like about the range? I am thinking of buying one but I'm in Canada. If I bring it up, the warranty is void. Any feedback from anyone would be awesome!


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Sorry, I don't check this thread very often. Okay, I can report what I know about the Verona after almost a year--intermittent, because it is a second house, but I am up there at least three months. My sister and I have cooked up plenty of meals on this stove, for lots of guests over the past year. My comparisons are from these two points of view: I have had a Lacanche for 10 years, and before that, complete crap electric stoves. Some variables!

Ignition works great, oven heats well, cooks well. If the Lacanche is considered high performance, I don't see any difference in my results on the Verona. Good sear, sufficient BTU's. (When I had an electric stove, my plan to make chili was to get the hottest, largest burner red hot, then put the pan on it to get as hot as possible, then add room temperature ground beef, avoid moving the meat until at least one surface was browned, then resign myself to the fact that once I turned the meat, the rest was going to be mushy.)

I have the Verona with one big oven, which is too large for much of what I do--I've gotten used to having two smaller ovens on the Lacanche, which I like very much. But I bought the single oven to save money. On the other hand, when we were cooking for a large group, there was lots of room in the oven for a very large Dutch Oven (maybe 14" long) plus space for other items.

My issue with both my Lacanche and the Verona are my tile backsplashes, which get stained from the gas exhaust. Anybody have a resolution to that? I just prop up a cookie sheet on the back of the Lacanche, but have to find a way to do it on the Verona, which doesn't lend itself to that solution.

Bottom line: if you don't have a big budget for a pretty, high performance stove (think Lacanche), then go for the Verona. I don't think I would move up to a Bertazzoni--the Verona is close enough to the Lacanche to keep me happy. I'm all for spending a lot of money on the range--but that probably only makes sense if you are in a very high end kitchen. The Verona looks great, cooks great and I think it is a big bargain that will make any kitchen look good.


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I've had my Verona range (36in two oven dual fuel) for 9 months now. I've been very happy with it. I prefer the two ovens, but for some I'm sure they will seem small.

For the price, I think the cooktop part is very good. They are closed burners which for some will be a problem, but I find they have plenty of power for what I do. Not every burner will simmer; the front burners remain too hot, but my work around is to start on a front burner and push to the back or use the center burner for simmering. As for enough power on the cooktop, unless I'm boiling water I never turn my burners all the way up.

The ovens cook evenly, and I like the fact they don't make the burner surface unbearably hot. Since the ovens vent rearward, you can cook on the burners while running the ovens at high temperature without an asbestos suit.


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I'm interested in Verona reviews, as well. Bumping...


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Mine is being installed today! I won't be moving in for about a month, but I will update when I can.


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Oooh! Congratulations, rebecca3142!!. Can I ask what made you decide on the Verona? And what other ranges did you consider?


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I strongly considered the Bertazzoni, but the duel fuel was much more expensive and the low end of the temperature range doesn't go low enough for us. We also liked the split design of the mini ovens for the Verona.

We wanted to have a 36" duel fuel range, but really didn't want to spend the money for the traditional brands. So this is a bit of a leap of faith. The few reviews are positive. Of course, we don't know about longevity or repair issues.


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RE: New Verona range

Hello everyone just came across this forum while trying to get info on my new verona dual fuel range. Just installed in a new remodeled kitchen And been in use about two weeks now. Loving it mostly and get tons of compliments on the beautiful red but the fan from the oven is driving me nuts. Anyone else find it noisy? Probably does not help that with a revamp of our galley kitchen the wall behind range was opened up to the living room so while watching tv only about 10 ft from range. Does the fan noise bother anyone else?


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Will be installing mine in a few weeks. It is so beautiful. I don't thing I'll notice any problems since I'm replacing an old, out-of-date range that performed horribly. I can't wait to see it in my kitchen and will keep you posted...


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RE: New Verona range

Will be installing mine in a few weeks. It is so beautiful. I don't thing I'll notice any problems since I'm replacing an old, out-of-date range that performed horribly. I can't wait to see it in my kitchen and will keep you posted...


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I'm quite religious about using the ventahood when cooking with gas, so that sound completely swamps any noises from the fan in the oven. I'm led to believe that if your range hood isn't noisy, it's not moving air....


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