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What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

Posted by jlc102482 (My Page) on
Tue, Nov 16, 10 at 21:16

This is a photo of a chandelier in the parlor of a local house museum (house is circa 1880 if I recall correctly).

I want to buy similar light fixtures for my own old home. I am especially obsessed with the chandelier. :) However, I don't know the proper term for either of these light fixtures, so I'm having trouble searching for any to buy. The chandelier looks Eastlake, and the other light looks like an oil lamp maybe, but that's all I know. Can anyone help with proper names?

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

Hmm, neither image posted. Isn't that special.

Here's a link to the chandelier-looking light:

http://images2.snapfish.com/232323232%7Ffp5365%3B%3Enu%3D3364%3E633%3E96%3B%3EWSNRCG%3D326%3A%3A%3A8364336nu0mrj

Here's a link to the oil lamp-type light:

http://images2.snapfish.com/232323232%7Ffp53689%3Enu%3D3364%3E633%3E96%3B%3EWSNRCG%3D326%3A%3A%3B76%3C6336nu0mrj


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

It's vaguely eastlake style chandileier. Is the bust attached to the light?

The oil lamp is a "pull down" light or "pulley light". You could snag it, pull it down to light it, and push it back up.


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

The first one is a Neo-Grec gasolier circa 1870s-1880s. Rejuvenation Lighting currently produces a similar one oritinally made by Hollings.


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?


The first chandy looks like a Eastlake for sure. If Linda C. chimes in, she may know.

Here is a picture of my cousins house using a chandy similiar to the second one. I think it looks good in a country kitchen.

Photobucket


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

The one above is brass and of course yours is made of wrought iron. I would call the second one a Lantern chandy, but not sure of the proper name.


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

Rejuvenations Neo-Grec chandelier. Neo-Grec is a specific style that was a later, victorianized version of the earlier Greek Revival. It is differentiated somewhat from Eastlake by the presence of classical elements such as the figures on your piece, but since it was essentially contemporary to Eastlake there are similarities.
Photobucket

Here is a link that might be useful: Rejuvenation


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

Pal, you certainly know what your talking about. Your a good source of information.

.....Jane


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

If there are stylized palmettes/anthemions, it's neo-grec. Good catch palimpsest.
Casey


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

The kerosine lamp in the linked picture appears to be missing the pulley mechanism and the smoke bell....but..I guess I would call it a hanging kerosine lamp.
Linda C


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

A bit off topic about your first piece specifically, but here is a Greek Revival-Late Federal (as opposed to Neo-Grec) chandelier. 1800-1820 ish.
Photobucket

And here is a c. 1845 solar lamp from the Greek Revival period
Photobucket

And here is the sibling to yours again:
Photobucket

This is an earlier Argand Lamp where function was still trumping ornament a bit, because the technology was so new c. 1830
Photobucket

I think you can see an evolution between the chandelier, the solar lamp, and the Neo-Grec gasolier, in particular.


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

It also might be well to point out that the gas...as in natural gas...fueled chandelieres are always hung by a pipe that the gas can run through...never a chain or a thin wire sort of thing.And the gas fueled lights always have a petcock which can turn on or off the gas supply.
Linda C


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

True, and this is where many reproductions drop the ball: a natural gas fixture hung by chains. The solar lamp and argand lamp above are hung by chains because these are oil lamps or kerosene lamps that were fed only from the central reservior. I don't know how long that solar lamp would have burned before needing a refill.


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RE: What are the proper names for these Victorian light fixtures?

The other lamp you are trying to figure out is a library lamp. It held a reservoir of oil (not gas) and while some could be pulled down, most were not. They were common in a less well to do house. (a larger home would have had a more spectacular fixture).

They come in many different colors, from ruby to opal to painted glass shades.


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