Return to the Antiques & Collectibles Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Brownware? or What?

Posted by annie1971 (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 10, 11 at 18:11

Photobucket
I'm hoping someone can tell me more about these pieces. I know they're 100+ in age. The salt cellar has an incised mark (or maybe it's a capital letter G or C) then in script, angier(or n). I don't think the wooden spoon belongs with the set, but it has always been stored with them. I have reason to believe they are either Scottish or Irish, but don't know for sure. I've been told they could be Brownware, but can't find anything like them in my research and can't verify that either. If they are much older than 100 years, I'd like to know so I can link them to the right family member. Anyone have an opinion?
Annie


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
Here's The Back Marks

Photobucket

Maybe someone can make this out.


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

They are not what I know as brown ware, How do you "know they are 100+ in age"??
Where did you get them? why do you believe they are Scottish or Irish?
Can you post pictures of the marks on the bottoms of the other pieces? How about a view of the holes in the top of the salt? Closer look of the handle on the mustard? How big are they?
Also would like to see closer the decoration on the bottom half of the pieces....looks like it's hand done with a stylus...
interesting pieces.
Linda C


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

LindaC: I know they are 100 years because they were my grandmother's who immigrated in 1910 and I think they came with her. At any rate, my father was born 1912, and they have been a part of the family ever since. She was Scottish but was orphaned and spent time in Ireland with relatives until she was able go out on her own as a governess. I've been able to date several other family pieces that I was told belonged to my grandmother that were actually my great grandmother's. That's why I'm curious as to age about these pieces. As far as I can tell the other pieces don't have marks, but I will photograph them, as well as the pepper holes and mustard pot handle. I will be interested in what and why you're looking at them, especially in the pepper holes! Thanks
Annie


 o
More Photos

Here's the mustard pot bottom and handle and the pepper bottom and holes. I hope there's something there that helps.
mustard pot handle
mustard pot bottom
pepper holes
pepper bottom


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

The inscription looks like Sangier to me. It could be a signature from a small potter and yes, it does look incised. This is a very common technique for small English potters to use for signage. If it is Sangier, it could very well be French, but I am not familiar with any potter or pottery by that name.

Yes........this could be brownware. Looks it to me if the bottom of the pepper is unglazed.


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

Brownware is made from brown clay. also, sometimes that stuff with a dark brown glaze is called brownware. There was some brownware clay in the UK and some early Native American pottery used brown clay...but the unglazed parts were brown or a grey-ish brown color.
Your pieces are yellow ware. They sort of appear hand thrown....the holes in the pepper appear to be uneven enough to be done by a potter with a sharp instrument, and the handle appears to be attached by hand.
And all the pieces are not marked. I think this is a one of a kind set made by the person who signed the one piece.
Linda C


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

Actually the mustard pot is signed or incised as well, it's extremely difficult to see, even with a lupe. The pepper shaker is unglazed on the bottom and a terracotta/brown color.

LindaC: They may appear to be yellow on your monitor, probably due to poor photography on my part. They really are brown.


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

Clay comes in all ranges from blue to white to yellow to brown and everything in between all over the world. And this is made from tan-brown clay. Darker than what you'd normally call yellow ware. But you could call it that if you wish.

Of course a handle like that is applied by hand, even on moulded pieces. Greenware is very fragile, and it would never survive if it were cast like that. We used to get a lot of breakage on little nubbin handles when moulded in.

This has not been brought over from Europe. It's an American product. I can see the letters U.S.A. on the bottom of handled pot.


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

At first glance I thought the mustard pot said USA, as well. But under a magnifying piece it's part of a script that ends with an a u (or w ) a r e. Very difficult to make out.


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

I have a cupboard and shelves with lots of pitchers and cups with molded handles. The handles are not molded with the piece but attached probably as green ware or maybe after the first firing. Other pieces like the sauce boat appear to have the handle molded with the whole piece. Most of the stuff is Mason's ironstone, made in England.
Just for curiosity....what do you call Antique Bennington pottery/stoneware....the stuff that often has a rockingham glaze...but also may have a plain brown glaze? I call that yellow ware....with a brown glaze.
Am I correct when I see that the foot of your pieces is unglazed and that is the color of the clay....while the bottom has a glaze on it?
I think we will never know about the condiment set because the production of whoever made it was so small. But just when I say that other pieces will show up....and suddenly I will be seeing it everywhere! LOL!


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

"Am I correct when I see that the foot of your pieces is unglazed and that is the color of the clay....while the bottom has a glaze on it? "

Hard to tell from the pic, but some potteries put their 'firsts' on a grinding wheel to finish off the bottoms. Some are left totally raw ground like McCoy utility ware and cookie jars, and some are ground and then glazed. Yes, of course handles are moulded and then attached. They're not typically free form on slip ware. You can have rudimentary handles cast right in on some pieces, but there is a high failure rate on those and it would typically be for things like cookie jar knobs. The only handles I have ever seen moulded right in are on antique urns and it's a stretch to call them a handle. I have an old Roseville urn with the handles moulded in but they are indeed rudimentary.

I still think that says U.S.A. on the bottom. It's easy to not be able to tell because of glazing globs. You also mistook that "S" fore a G. It's definately an "S"


 o
On second thought

Could the bottom word be the ware? As in Sangier Ware? I copied the pic and expanded it and that looks possible.


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

Calliope: I think you could be right, and I missed that word also until I see it on my computer screen. But I have to say it looks like the same word you say is USA on the other piece.
LindaC: I never really thought about what to call Antique Bennington, but it does have a definite yellow under tone. I always thought yellow ware was yellow. Now I really don't know what brown ware is.
The feet are glazed but seem to be worn or unevenly glazed. Same with the bottoms, except for the pepper shaker, which is unglazed on the bottom.


 o
One More Photo!

Can you stand one more look? I thought a photo of the inside of the salt cellar might help with identification. Do the swirls and little nub in the center indicate hand thrown? The mustard pot is the same. No way to tell about the pepper shaker.
Photobucket
I really appreciate all of your thoughts and opinions. Thanks very much.
Annie


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

Well....I just went around the house and looked at things my friend Kay the potter has thrown for me....and the bowls mugs flowerpot shapes all have that swirl in the bottom.
So I would say it's hand thrown. Is the inside unglazed? If so I may have to revise my thoughts from yellow ware to redware.
Linda C


 o
RE: Brownware? or What?

No it's not unglazed; it's just a little more rough in texture on the very bottom. Everything else inside is the same smooth glaze as the outside.
Annie


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Antiques & Collectibles Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here