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Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

Posted by notitfortat (My Page) on
Sun, Aug 5, 12 at 22:11

Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

Photobucket

Photobucket


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

That is a "texturized" print of some sort. A print that has had stuff added to it to simulate oil paint.
don't know the artist....


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

That was my first impulse too, but I paint and I'm looking at the relief on the brush strokes and it's consistent with the strokes and the textured relief does not run across the strokes but with it. I would be able to tell in a nano-second if I saw it in person, but just having to rely on my monitor can't really make that opinion. I'm not familiar with that scene and the signature is too close in hue to the background for me to even begin to make it out.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

The style looks like that of Bob Ross, the "Joy of Painting" guy, from PBS, but that is obviously not his signature. I wonder if it is someone who learned to paint by watching his shows.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

My guess is that it's a sweatshop assembly line painting.

"Starving Artists: The Process

Factory workers stand, for hours at a time, in front of machines that support a long roll of blank canvas. With brushes and paint, each worker is responsible for painting one image or portion of a painting's entire composition. For instance, when producing a landscape painting, Artist #1 will paint a tree, Artist #2 will paint a bird, and so on. At intervals and without warning, the canvas is automatically repositioned by machine to expose the next blank area of canvas to the workers who will paint it. The workers repeat the painting process. During the process, Artist #1 paints that same tree over and over again for the next 14 hours straight.

Well, just like Artist #1 whose job it is to paint that tree, there is another artist in the starving artist sweatshop who signs paintings. Despite their country of origin, the signed surnames on the majority of the paintings are not Eastern. Marketing dictates that westerners expect to buy paintings signed with western surnames like Smith, Worthington, or Jones, so the producers sign all of the paintings with a few of the most common western surnames. This piecemeal art process continues until hundreds of look-alike paintings are produced. Completed paintings are cut from the end of the canvas roll, stapled to a wooden stretcher, framed, and crated for shipment to a hotel lobby near you.

Now that you know the inside scoop on the starving artists sales, don't you think that your $50 would be better spent on a good pencil sketch by a student artist at your local college or university? I certainly do."

This one description of how it's done. Other places make copies of existing museum quality artworks.

Eileen

Here is a link that might be useful: Art factories.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

But I think it's actually a print of some sort that is "enhanced" by touches of oil paint here and there....also done in the assembly line fashion but not so individually done.
Robert Kinkaid has a lot of "enhanced" pictures in his line.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

Would be interesting to see close-up of the "lake" area. There doesn't appear to be a lot of oil paint brushstrokes there.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

As a livelong artist, that is definitely a print enhanced. There are dozens of them at Home Goods although yours has some age on it.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

Yes........also think so.


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RE: Anyone recognize this painting or the artist?

I am an artist, and I agree with barnmom. This is one of those wet-in-wet assembly line paintings. They all have that same general look, and are done very quickly. Kind of a scam, and sort of lifeless as far as art goes - when you think about it, how much life and spirit can go into art produced this way? But this one isn't that bad, and certainly better than a blank wall.


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