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What I bought

Posted by Lindac (My Page) on
Thu, May 17, 12 at 18:51

I have no delusions that this is a 1765 mote spoon....but what is it? I see no evidence that it has been doctored. No marking. It's 9 inches long. And from what I know of old silver, it's not been commercially polished and the patina is as it should be.
It was advertised as an olive spoon...I paid $42 including shipping.
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Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: What I bought

NOT an expert by any means, but gonna take a "stab" at what it is. Maybe pointed end is an ice pick and slotted spoon is to retrieve chips into a glass?? Certainly pretty!


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RE: What I bought

Nope.....Ice is harder than a skinny sterling pick. But the pick end is a tiny bit "wonky" so maybe it was used to poke ice...LOL!
It's really too long for a traditional olive spoon....but maybe it's a non traditional olive spoon? or maybe it's a newer mote spoon....
But it sure is cute!!!


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RE: What I bought

No idea what it is-I rely on all of you for that sort of thing, but I agree that it sure is cute! Love it. Fun find, Linda. I hope someone knows what it is.


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RE: What I bought

A neophyte here, but I once read about "mote" spoons. The holes in the spoon are to get the tea leaves floating in the teapot out, and the "pick" end was to poke down the spout of the teapot as some teapots have a sort of strainer where the spout meets the pot, and tea leaves sometimes catch and build up there.


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RE: What I bought

It could certainly be used for olives and cherries. The pointed end could spear chunks of fruit.

I have a Fork and Spoon pair, silver plated and about the same size. We use it to serve salads.


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RE: What I bought

It's probably an olive spoon & the ones similar to mote spoons are always long handled. This form is fairly common although yours seems much nicer than most. I don't think I've ever seen one with a monogram. Is it English? The American ones are usually cheaply made & yours looks anything but.


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RE: What I bought

No marking.....probably not English.
And who puts a period after the name on a monogram?
At any rate it will get used for olives....or perhaps pickles.....or given to someone who uses loose tea.


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RE: What I bought

I didn't notice the period until you mentioned it - that is strange! I checked the length of mine & it's 8-3/4", also without a maker's mark.

DH is a tea drinker & was fascinated with the idea that the pointy end could be used to poke the tea pot spout - even though he only uses bags! Don't believe I've ever used it for anything.


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RE: What I bought

It's short for "Hooperstein".


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RE: What I bought

I have a mote spoon as well as an olive spoon -- both have holes in their bowls and pointy ends. Your spoon is more similar to my olive spoon than my mote spoon. I assume that the pointy end was to "stab" the olives in the jar. Yours is pretty and I love the monogram!


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RE: What I bought

I have a mote spoon as well as an olive spoon -- both have holes in their bowls and pointy ends. Your spoon is more similar to my olive spoon than my mote spoon. I assume that the pointy end was to "stab" the olives in the jar. Yours is pretty and I love the monogram!


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RE: What I bought

I cannot tell how large the bowl of the spoon is, but it resembles a julep spoon without a drinking straw handle. Sometimes the bowls are pierced. It's a beauty.


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RE: What I bought

Damn.....now I have to look for a julep spoon!


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RE: What I bought

Rat-tailed mint julep spoon would be my guess, although the total lack of hallmarks is puzzling.

They have pierced bowls to slosh the mint and sugar and ice around, some have hollow handles so you can sip with the same spoon.

Maybe the pointy end skewered some fruit?


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RE: What I bought

There are several of these types of spoons on Ebay, but none as pretty as yours.


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RE: What I bought

la la la....I don't hear you!!!!...I didn't need one...let alone 2!!!


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RE: What I bought

looks like this olive/moat spoon currently listed. Sounds like you got a deal compared to the asking price here:

Here is a link that might be useful: Olive/Moat spoon


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RE: What I bought

If that seller gets her asking price, I have a similar one I'll sell her for half that amount & she'll have a huge profit margin - & mine doesn't have a crimp in the bowl! Oh hell, she can have it for $50 & I'll be a happy camper.


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RE: What I bought

Linda,
I thought you might get a kick out of seeing what one of the large matching services is selling as mote spoons in Louis XV. Since they have another one for sale in a different Whiting pattern (with identical piercings), I suspect it may be 'handcrafted'. Otherwise, I have no idea what the original purpose may have been.

Here is a link that might be useful: Louis XV Mote Spoon


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RE: What I bought

Not much doubt that it's "hand crafted"....but very well done to make that handle extension and keep the curliecues like that.
Do you suppose it was a gravy ladle....flattened, pierced and elongated?


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RE: What I bought

Good guess! I hadn't thought of that possibility because it seems too labor intensive to be profitable ...but if your 'craftsman' is in China & you happen to have a few damaged ladles lying around........

Judging by the thinness of the handle, I'm going with bouillon ladle since they are a little longer & more delicate than most gravy ladles. And more prone to damage.


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RE: What I bought

Was a boullion ladle made in Louis XV? I have been collecting that pattern for a while and never seen one.


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RE: What I bought

Apparently they aren't too common but they seem to have been made in most of the popular patterns from the turn of the century. It seems Louis XV made one (& sometimes more) of everything possible but I don't have a catalogue.

Years ago on a silver forum I supplied photos of the Frontenac serving pieces that I owned & the gravy & bouillon ladles are shown next to each other in the last photo; oddly enough the thread has survived for 13 years even though the flatware forum is long gone! The bouillon ladle belongs to my SIL who bought it on ebay as a gravy.

Here is a link that might be useful: Frontenac gravy & bouillon ladles


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RE: What I bought

Judging by the length, this may be a bouillon ladle. They usually range from 8 - 8.5" when laid on a yardstick or ruler. When buying on ebay, I always confirm the method of measuring a ladle - there are dozens of sellers who use a tape & follow the curve of the handle around the bowl to the lip - & that add'l inch or so can make a huge difference in the usage & therefore the price.

Here is a link that might be useful: Louis XV bouillon? ladle


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RE: What I bought

Well.....then I sure don't know what they used for that mote spoon!
On the "mote spoon" there appears to be an extra "doo dad" at the top.....and many extra curley cues down the handle.
Beautiful ladle.....stop drooling, Linda!!


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