2cm or 3 cm thickness for your caesarstone?

marissa16December 12, 2013

I have read previous threads but not clear what thickness most people are using for their kitchen counters. I will be doing a half bullnose edge and was thinking 30cm but not sure. Would like to hear what others have done. Any regrets?

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snoonyb

Generally, 2 or 3cm determines whether or not you will need a rough top.2cm yes, 3cm no.

With 2cm the trim piece hides the rough top, with 3cm it's strictly decorative.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2013 at 11:24PM
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Trebruchet

Marissa 16:

You can install 2 or 3 cm Caesarstone as a countertop, with or without a built-up front edge and subtop. Whatever look floats your boat, although it seems thinner tops have been trending lately.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2013 at 11:51PM
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Gooster

I had 2 cm installed. It is common here to use 2 cm on everything. Also I have a 15 inch overhang with a supported subtop

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 10:25AM
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marissa16

2 cm trending is what I have read not that it matters. I understand with the 3 cm, the pieces are glued and was wondering if most people notice the seam. I suppose it depends on the skill of the fabricator.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 11:20AM
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nosoccermom

In Europe the trend these days is towards ultra-slim counters. It probably also depends on the style of your kitchen (contemporary or traditional)

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 11:40AM
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live_wire_oak

It's largely controlled by location. If you're in the East, 3 cm is all that's pretty much available In the West, it's 2 cm that dominates. 3 cm doesn't need a subtom, where 2 cm does.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 12:35PM
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Linelle

West Coaster with built-up 2 cm over plywood base. My Caesarstone is dark and mottled and the seam is only detectable if you zoom way in and look for it. It's very smooth to the touch.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 1:01PM
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marissa16

Linelle, you are right. The seam blends in the pattern. I am confused because I thought you would not have a seam with 2 cm thickness.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 3:53PM
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sjhockeyfan325

You have to have a seam if you laminate the edge to cover the plywood sub-counter. With 3 cm, you don't need the plywood, so there's no seam and no laminated edge.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 4:04PM
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cookncarpenter

You can also do a mitered edge to achieve any thickness front edge you want. On one of our bath counters, I went with a 1-3/4" front edge on 2 cm Caesarstone in organic white.
With a miter, the seam is virtually undetectable.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 5:41PM
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sjhockeyfan325

cty, how is that done - is it a laminated edge, but with a mitered seam instead at the edge, rather than a straight seam across? We're using 3 cm Ceasarstone for the kitchen and one bath, but might be stuck with 2 cm something in the other bath.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 5:44PM
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Linelle

ctycdm and sjhockeyfan know what they're talking about. :) When I got my counter I didn't know anything about laminated edges. In my case, it turned out fine. I'm guessing it's a less expensive option than mitering.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 5:46PM
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sjhockeyfan325

linelle, in my old kitchen, I had a regular laminated seam! I know better now, I guess.

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 7:15PM
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cookncarpenter

Mitered edge joints are usually less noticeable than face joints in any material, however they don't work with edge details such as an ogee. You are pretty much limited to a square or eased edge. 2cm (either laminated or mitered) has always been the norm in CA for almost all slab material, in fact the first time I'd ever seen or heard of 3cm material was earlier this year when we put soapstone in our kitchen...

This post was edited by ctycdm on Fri, Dec 13, 13 at 21:12

    Bookmark   December 13, 2013 at 7:52PM
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Trebruchet

ctycdm:

Why would an ogee edge detail not work with a mitered top?

    Bookmark   December 14, 2013 at 5:24PM
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cookncarpenter

@ Trebruchet, I should have said, "they don't work as well" ... it can work, assuming the miter is done before the ogee is. You then have the joint showing up in the middle of the detail, where you risk having the seam much more visible than lower down on the edge face...just my opinion of course

    Bookmark   December 14, 2013 at 7:32PM
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susanlynn2012

I still have not decided if I am doing granite or Caesarstone so I am saving this post for reread again.

    Bookmark   December 14, 2013 at 8:19PM
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marissa16

I hate to sound stupid but so be it. Sjhockeyfan, you said with 3 cm there is no seam or laminated edge. When I initially went to the fabricator (and I will be going back this week to clarify), what I understood was the 3cm is not one solid piece but 2 pieces glued together for that thickness, hence the thin seam along the front which should not be very noticeable if done well. I am confused. Mind you, with this stuff it doesn't take much...

    Bookmark   December 15, 2013 at 1:12PM
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Trebruchet

marissa 16:

Estone comes in 1/4" (floors/vertical only), 2 cm, and 3cm. You can laminate the 2 and 3 cm to get to 4 and 6 cm respectively.

The appearance of laminated edges depends on the quality of the preparation, the clamping, the adhesive color match, and the color, particulate, and movement of the particular estone. This becomes much more art than science.

For the record, I am not a fan of solid underlaymnent under estone or stone, plywood or other; it is too dimensionally unstable and incompatible. Strips maybe and keep it 1/8" away from edges.

    Bookmark   December 15, 2013 at 1:33PM
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marissa16

Trebuchet, I appreciate your knowledge and am unfortunately still confused. I had caesarstone put in my kitchen in Chicago and there was nothing put over the cabinet but the quartz. And now I am about to do my kitchen in Florida (unfortunately, I don't recall the thickness of the quartz up north). So if they put the quartz directly over the cabinet, and use 3cm, then there should not be any laminating of layers?

    Bookmark   December 15, 2013 at 4:15PM
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Trebruchet

marissa16:

Correct, unless you want a 5 or 6cm edge.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2013 at 12:06PM
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marissa16

Thank you Trebruchet. I am going to the fabricator today to firm up my plans and drop off the sink. They will do a template tomorrow. I think I finally understand! Good to go with a clearer understanding how they fabricate and lay the quartz.

    Bookmark   December 16, 2013 at 12:12PM
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NoviceB

Hi, this is probably a dumb question, but would the front mitred edge partially cover over the vanity cabinet? If so, in order to achieve a really thick front edge appearance (eg 3"), it seems I would have to build up the top of the vanity cabinet with a plywood or similar base to avoid obstruction of the vanity cabinet, is that right? (We are working with a standard sized vanity cabinet with a false front drawer at the top - a 3" front edge that hangs over would partially cover the false front, which would look weird, right?) Thanks for any advice.

    Bookmark   July 17, 2014 at 1:07PM
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kudzu9

Yes, NoviceB, the only way for you to have it look decent is to raise the top surface with plywood so that the bottom of the front edge ends up where you now have it. A couple of years ago, I replaced a formica countertop with granite and did something similar. It's not a big deal to add plywood of the correct thickness to lift the new countertop.

    Bookmark   July 17, 2014 at 1:17PM
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