They say they can fix this ...

blackchamoisDecember 20, 2012

I am having my Caesartone Raven counters installed today. As you can see in the picture, the inside edge of the sink is not flush where the seams meet. (The top surface is fine.)

The guy says he can sand this (I hope without scratching my sink!)

Is this a "normal" installation issue?

What do you think? Will sanding fix this?

Thanks!!

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
joshuasamah

WHAT???????????? That is not acceptable in my book! I would have them replace the countertop if need be. They cut one piece too short.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 6:07PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
localeater

Ick. It is not acceptable. If the sanding does not render it perfect, they need to replace.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 6:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blackchamois

I think what they are doing is filling it with epoxy and sanding it???? Is that normal?

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 6:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
palimpsest

How much is the picture blown up?

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 6:42PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
suzanne_sl

And why is a piece of your sink hanging out? Could you back up a little so we can see the surrounding area?

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 6:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blackchamois

"How much is the picture blown up?"

The counter thickness is, I believe, 3/4".

Well, the guy is saying he did not use epoxy, but just sanded it down. It is difficult for me to see it now, as the sun is setting and I have no lights in my kitchen so I may need to reevaluate it tomorrow.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ck_squared

I would not accept that.

And I can't figure out how that curve is the inside edge of your sink. ??? I'd like a different pic as well.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blackchamois

"And why is a piece of your sink hanging out?"

"And I can't figure out how that curve is the inside edge of your sink. ???"

I have the Franke ORX110 sink.

I will take some other pictures as soon as they leave.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:24PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cookncarpenter

Caesar stone sands quite easily, as long as he doesn't hit the stainless, you're ok. If you can feel the joint with your eyes closed, it needs more sanding...

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:30PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
may_flowers

Why are they seaming it at the sink? I was told it's better to seam a few inches from a corner, which is where my seam is. Then they use the gizmo with the pads that pulls the seam tight. I assumed that's why the sink isn't the preferred place to seam.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:42PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
a2gemini

That is terrible - can't help you on whether sanding will help. Keep us updated as I am sure you will!

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:44PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blackchamois

ctycdm - Thanks for the tip! I do think it needs more sanding - I can feel a little bump. The guy said he needs to come back with a finer sand paper to do more.

mayflowers - In hindsight, I see your point. When he came to template the guy said he could do either. It didn't seem like he had a preference. My thought at the time was there would be less of a seam at the sink, but again totally see what you mean now.

a2gemini - From what I can tell it does appear to be better, but again, the lighting is not great at the moment. Will keep you all posted!

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 7:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
srosen

That does not look like an easy repair. Sanding in such a tight area close to the stainless will be difficult.
The crux is matching the repair to the original finish of the material.

    Bookmark   December 20, 2012 at 9:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mudworm

I agree that the original step in the seam is unacceptable and am glad to hear that the installer is able to sand it down to almost un-noticeable (unless I misread your update).

Having talked to four installers, I got the impression that different installers may have very different views on where the seam should be in relationship to cutouts. It just so happened that the three installers I have a lot of respect for all stated matter-of-factly that it's best to seam in the middle of a sink cutout because it's the least noticeable to the user. I don't know if that is true or not, but I'm happy with the outcome done that way.

When my countertop was installed, they did use a pair of suction cups and a belt in between to pull the two slabs very tight. I have two seams at a sink and a countertop cutout and they are almost invisible. The perfect alignment was not done without sacrifices though -- they had to chisel my drywall at some spots, rotate the pieces this way and that way. As a result, we had a section along the edge that had caulking almost 1/4" thick. But that avoided the need to sand the seam in place. I know I'll be doing backsplash, so the gap filled with caulking will not be an issue and I left a 5 star Yelp review for the installer.

    Bookmark   January 4, 2013 at 12:03PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Review of Hanssem Cabinets
Has anyone used Hanssem cabinets? How is their quality?...
kodak1
How old will I be?
How long did your kitchen remodel take, from the tearing...
ryseryse_2004
How to deal with high contractor bids based on your location?
In a way, I'm echoing what beachem is saying about...
andyscott
Kitchen layout, updated
Revised layout:
edwardshome
A small sink with a cover?
I know I've seen this but can't find it now. I'm looking...
Annette Holbrook
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™