Design Around This #3: 1920s Kitchens and All That Jazz

marcoloNovember 13, 2011

Welcome to this week's episode of "Design Around this." The challenge:

Design a 1920s kitchen in a way that is usable today. Show all major design elements on a mood board. You can tell us about the house first and even describe your "clients" if you want. Important: Do not post the One True Kitchen in any form. We debated whether to even allow white cabinets at all, but some suggested they would be OK as long as color was used on permanent features and fixtures -- not accessories. However if you have the cheek to "design" a kitchen with white cabinets plus white subways plus marble or soapstone counters, we will have no mercy on you.

SO, WHAT'S A 1920s KITCHEN?

During the 1920s, kitchens evolved from the all-white sanitary style of the late 19th and early 20th centuries into something new. No longer purely functional rooms occupied by the chef and scullery maid, they became the domain of a new breed of housewife--in Julia Child's words, the "servantless American cook." And this cook wanted something pretty.



Enter color. Style. New European influences brought home by doughboys coming back down to the farm after they'd seen Paree. An exuberant mishmash of historical styles revived and redefined, including Tudor manors,


storybook cottages,


French farmhouses, Swiss chalets, English parsonages, and Dutch, Spanish and American colonial revival styles.

There was also a new influence on the scene, ushered in by the 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Moderns\-\-Art Deco. But it was a small influence so far, and inspired more by the fluid forms of natural movement rather than the blinding speed of machinery. Only at the end of the decade did we see the big sweeping metallic curves of the Chrysler building. Whatever its style, the 1920s kitchen was pretty\-\-and by pretty, I mean feminine. Stoves, like the furniture of the time, perched on delicate cabriole legs.

Nooks were popular, in every color.

Do not rely only on these few pictures for inspiration. Your required (but highly enjoyable) homework: Visit both galleries (1 & 2) in this fantastic site of 1920s kitchen images and get inspired. Also poke through American Vintage Home's albums on flickr. (Note that a lot of these images are linoleum ads, but you can use another flooring material if you wish.)

Some...

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roarah

My kitchen is found within a later 1920s tudor house priced between 400k and 500k and the reno budget will hopefully cost 10 to 15% of its value. Most of the cost will be in custom cabs and tile floor. If the budget gets out of hand the owners might consider Linolium floors in place of tile but try to keep the aqua in the pattern.
The nook area was turned into a bath in the 70s:( so there is only an island and the family will eat meals in their dining room which is only open to the kitchen by a swing door, no open floor plan here.
The elements are a mix of art deco and craftman which were in favor into the thirties. No white in this kitchen the subway tiles are in the baths only:) The idea is built around an art deco piece the family already has and will be used as a free standing pantry. The walls are paperedh a simple black and white to mimic lighting, the floors are hopefully tiled, the cabs are wood similar to the kitchen shown and have a craftman like deco(?) feel, the backsplash is tin, the sink is nickel, and the counters are polished marble to add some light they are polished not honed...either way they etch so we opted for the shine to help counter the darker elements in the room. The lights are wall sconces, and pendants. with undercounter task lights and no pot lights. Here it is and let me have it I know I am not good at this but I would like to learn the art, so critism is needed:) TIA


    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 12:35PM
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marcolo

How on earth did you get that done so fast?!

Is that real wallpaper or a closeup of the lighting pattern?

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 5:42PM
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ideagirl2

That's gorgeous, Roarah! And this is an awesome challenge, Marcolo. I wish I had the time to do it. And wish I hadn't hit a roadblock... if anyone wants to incorporate the original butter yellow and burgundy wall tile I recently found in our kitchen into their design...

...I would be not only interested but immensely grateful, because I have half a dozen sample cabinet doors in different colors and at least forty countertop samples (laminate, wood, marble...) and I still haven't found a combination that works to my satisfaction with this tile. That's the roadblock. I don't know where to go with this design challenge because I can't seem to see my way past the roadblock. If more brilliant minds want to have a go, that would be awesome!

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 6:14PM
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roarah

I have a 1920s home so I have been researching this era for years and it did take me almost 2 hours to come up with this plan today. It is real paper I marked it as Bradbury and Bradbury, but do not see it on their site now. I found the image today by google"ing" "1920s art deco white and black wallpaper" and there were many that would work but this did not cause my vertigo to flare:) Ok Now I want a critique please!

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 6:20PM
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roarah

Those tiles are the bees knees,Ideagirl what a great find!!! I love butter yellow, burgundy and greens and walnut cabs. I also think grey might work too. I will work a bit more tonight on ideas for you.

I just realized I used one of Marcolo's pics in my board.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 6:57PM
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sochi

The home owners are a professional couple in their late-30s, they purchased their 1920s "cottage" home two years ago.

The home owners decided to channel the original 1920s lady of the house as they planned their renovation. If their minds' eye, she was a fashionable young woman who loved to entertain, much like the current woman of the house.

They developed their colour scheme for the kitchen based on popular colours of the era - creams, browns, greens and blues, reflected in the fabulous outfit above.

A vintage '20s sink they found on Kijiji (like Craigslist) suited their cottage home well, cemented their colour choices and served as a launch pad for the feel of the rest of the kitchen.


While the couple would love an entirely unfitted kitchen, it wouldn't be practical in their current space. They opted for a semi-fitted kitchen. Their cabinet maker would build a green coloured cabinet for the sink with an open shelf below it, similar to the image below, but with softer, more rounded lines. The sink unit will flanked by two mid-tone wood cabinets, similar to the cabinet on the left in the picture below. They were looking for simplicity, symmetry and soft curves.

Curves and colours like on this wooden cabinet:

They really wanted a modern version of the hoosier cabinet, something just like this, but with slightly softer lines:

A couple of stand alone vintage-inspired appliances; DH loves the chocolate oven and he vetoed the green Aga in favour of:

Inspired by this pretty floral motif tile:

They want a backsplash featuring the repeated motif of the floral tile with soft rounded cream and brown tiles, something like this:

A fabulous curvy deco-inspired island table - they are considering having the island table edged (or perhaps a row in the middle?) in the floral motif tile above:

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 7:01PM
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remodelfla

I want those shoes!

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 7:07PM
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rosesstink

For Roarah looking for feedback.

I don't think you need a light colored countertop to balance the dark wood. IMO a dark counter makes more of a statement with dark cabinets.

On the design challenge, a 1920's kitchen can still function today so I would minimal changes. Add a microwave somewhere. A real cook can cook in almost any space.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 7:09PM
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marcolo

First--Ideagirl, please make a separate thread for that question. I know many of us will do whatever we can to help you save that gorgeous tile (which matches your F.O. stove?) and make it work for you.

sochi, I love the fact that your color scheme would be considered dissonant or odd today--because it's great, and we need to open our minds more to evolve our tastes. Two quick issues. It looks like you're using the tile and the wallpaper as the color keys to the room, the objects that include all the colors together. But on my monitor the tile doesn't exactly seem to match? Also, that wavy light fixture for above the sink is awesome, and has that characteristic that I adore in period-inspired renovations: ambiguity. Except for the ceiling plate, you could easily stare at that fixture wondering, "Is it new? No, it's original, right? No, wait, that is new? Or not?" Love it. However, I am not seeing the connection to the more utilitarian schoolhouse fixture.

roarah, finding those tiles to use with that armoire is pretty gobsmacking great. I can't find that wallpaper either but whether it works or not seems to me to depend on whether the scale is different enough from the floor tiles not to compete. If it's much different, it could be awesome, IMHO.

BTW I just want to say, because the first couple of entries showed stained cabinets, that I want to make sure I wasn't too confusing in the rules. Painted cabs are A-OK. Even white is OK, we just aren't looking for more One True Kitchens.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 7:18PM
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sochi

marcolo - you're totally right about the school house light, it doesn't work. At the last minute I thought I should throw some type of ceiling light in the mix, but I didn't take the time to look for something appropriate.

Colours - yeah, the colours don't quite jive on my monitor either. I took the colours in the wallpaper as inspiration, I might not use it in the kitchen. IRL I think using three of the colours - cream, brown and celadon, or cream, brown and light blue would be okay even today. Probably not those shades of blue and green together though (although my research showed that they did mix them up in the '20s). I mixed up my cabinet finishes in my description as well - I would want cabinets and appliances to be either cream, brown (walnut, stained oak) or a green that would work with the sink. The sink cabinet would probably be wood, the flanking cabinets could be painted green with a cream modern hoosier.

I love love love that wavy light fixture.

And the shoes - remodelfla - it was really all about those shoes for me! Well, and the floral motif tile and wavy light fixture. I really do like this kitchen, assuming I can get colours that work together IRL.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 8:37PM
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aliris19

Wow; another set of skills and knowledge I had no inkling I didn't know. These are called "idea sets" and "story boards"? Who knew? Is this what designers do, in school maybe? I had no idea ...

Nothing to add, of course. This is so out of my element. But I would note, sochi, that I vote for a row of tiles in the middle of that table, not on the edge. ;)

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 8:53PM
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live_wire_oak

This is a tiny PNW bungalow that was formerly a rental, so the interior space had been trashed by the time my mythical late 20's single struggling musician purchased it.

Since the interior was trashed, he decided to go ahead and finish demolishing the interior walls and create a large studio out of the two bedroom home. In the process of demolition, he found a remnant of the former linoleum under one of the remaining cabinets.

Since finances are very tight, it's Craigslist and thrift stores and DIY for everything. The second inspiration piece that is scored on Craigslist is a brick red burgundy AGA, which will serve as the hearth to the whole studio home. A mint green Hoosier cabinet, an actual butcher block, a marble topped sewing machine table, and an old potting bench painted red are the foundation "base cabinets" along with a table cobbled together from elements found at an architectural salvage store and a couple of garage sale armoires, painted green. A plate rack, and a mahogany curio wall shelf give wall and pantry storage. He goes to a used restaurant supply house and picks up the sink and faucet.

For the floor, 3 colors of VCT that mimic the old linoleum are chosen. The big splurge is a William Morris reproduction wallpaper in a rose and green floral pattern. Two schoolhouse lights are also purchased new, as is some ticking fabric for a curtain to shield the ugly plumbing under the sink.

Since this is a studio home, the bed also has to serve as the sofa, so a nice daybed is positioned in the bumpout window alcove. Two club chairs are reupholstered in a cream, tuscan red, and mint green stripe. An old trunk serves as a coffee table, and the second garage sale green armoire holds clothing and a small TV. A couple of vintage brass chairs mix with an exterior aluminum cafe table for an eating spot, and a neighbor who is finally renovating his 80's home gives hime the almost worn out Aubusson rug with the teal and rose floral tones. Thrift sale lamps and a tiered acrylic chandelier round out the current purchases, and he reserves a large space for his only treasure, the baby grand piano he is making payments on.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 8:56PM
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sochi

roarah - I can't critique meaningfully as I'm not terribly well schooled in 1920s kitchens, but a couple of points. First - I love the free standing pantry and the tile, gorgeous. The cabinets are very cool, but like you, I would probably want light counters in that kitchen. And I'd only do dark uppers if I had a very bright west or south facing room with plenty of windows. But that is me, I crave light, but love dark. Looks like a great kitchen to me!

aliris19 - Yes, designers of all types use idea boards to pull different ideas for a project together. I've wanted to learn how to do one and just played around with one yesterday for the first time. I used Olioboard (a free app), relatively simple and fun.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 9:04PM
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roarah

Sochi I like your kitchen almost as much as I love you real walnut modern kitchen. The only thing I thought of when i viewed it was that the green would not work with the sink but you than went on to explain that was a typo:) I thought about having no uppers in my kitchen but I than would not be able to use that tin in moderation and then it loses its appeal.

LWO is the single puppy boy interested in cougars;0 I love his digs!

Marcolo I found a pic of the wall paper in chocolate and orange on Graham and Brown. It shows it more to scale here.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 9:26PM
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cawaps

Sarah bought this 1927 house in Oakland, CA through a short sale.

The house purchase stretched her finances, so she didn't have a lot of money for remodeling, but the existing kitchen was unusable. The cabinets were a mess due to water damage and the house had been stripped of most of its fixtures. Sarah wanted to do a period appropriate kitchen, but faced constraints on budget and availability. And let's face it, she wanted the convenience of things like full-extension drawer glides and built-in cabinetry.

The old flooring in the house was 50-year-old linoleum that had also suffered water damage. She was impressed that it had lasted that long, and it was appropriate to the vintage of the home, so she decided to replace it with new linoleum--Marmoleum's Asian Tiger. She picked her colors around the linoleum, pulling a gray-blue-green color from the flooring for the cabinets and wallpaper. The orange from the floor is echoed in the window treatment.

She would have loved period-appropriate inset cabinets, but that was way out of her budget. Instead she bought Shaker-style cabinets from one of the Chinatown kitchen and bath supply stores. Painting them blue-gray was a major do-it-yourself project. The counter is laminate, in grey-tone pattern called Painted Screen.

This style

But this color...

floor & wallpaper

Curtain fabric and countertop


Hardware

For the backsplash, she wants to eventually do a peach tile backsplash. But there's no money for that now, so she painted backsplash in peach and stenciled a pattern in an orangey red to pick up the floor colors.

stencil pattern

background color

border color

The sink and range wereare both from post-WWII, which gave the kitchen a vintage look without exactly being period-appropriate. She got the sink from her brother, who salvaged it when he remodeled the kitchen in his Craftsman. With the integral drainboard it evoked the feel of 20's wall-mounted sinks while preserving storage space underneath,...

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 10:00PM
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ideagirl2

Omigod I love love love this thread. Cawaps, can you post photos of your friend's kitchen?

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 10:44PM
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cawaps

Marcolo, I want to comment on two things you said. First, "sochi, I love the fact that your color scheme would be considered dissonant or odd today." Hmmmmm. I decorated most of my house in that palette, and I found plenty of fabric, pillows, curtains that totally work with it. I don't actually think it's that odd, at least the hues used. But if you think it's odd, I'm going to pat myself on the back for going against the grain. And I love Sochi's vision.

Second, on Roarah's plan: "I can't find that wallpaper either but whether it works or not seems to me to depend on whether the scale is different enough from the floor tiles not to compete. If it's much different, it could be awesome, IMHO." What I noticed in looking at pictures of 1920's kitchens is that a lot of the floors have really bold patterns that don't, to my mind, go with the equally bold patterns in the curtains or other design elements. The red checked floor with the orange and blue curtains in one of the photos you posted is one example of many. I'm just saying, from a period standpoint it probably isn't an issue.

I found Roarah's palette to be very restrained compared to the actual 1920's kitchen (but the patterns are bold!). It's lovely (love the floor tile), and would probably appeal to modern homeowners more than some of the other color combinations.

LWO, I love your colors and you nailed the look of the unfitted kitchens of the era. I don't entirely buy that a man would choose that wallpaper (although I'm not sure how you create something in the vein of the "pretty and feminine" kitchens of the 20s and still make it manly). And even if that Aga were on Craigslist, he couldn't afford it. But that is a budget question, not a design question.

Thanks, Marcolo, for organizing. These threads have been really fun.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2011 at 11:10PM
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cawaps

Ideagirl2, "Sarah" is purely fictional, for the purpose of setting the stage for the kitchen. I was inspired by Live Wire Oak's posting on the Colonial Revived thread that set the context for the remodel so wonderfully.

The brother's sink isn't entirely fictional (it's MY brother's sink), but unlike in the story, he is still using it in his mid-century, metal-cabinet kitchen inside his classic Craftsman home. It is similar to the one Sochi posted about today (link below)--it's a better picture than the one I used:

Here is a link that might be useful: Sochi's 1960s sink post

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 12:28AM
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sochi

Cawaps, good for you for working the Asian Tiger in! I like the orange and blue together. The peach makes me nervous, but my mother overdid the peach in the 80s and I guess I still have a peach hangover. I like that interesting colour combinations coming out here though.

Crazy coincidence that your sink looks to be identical to the one I spotted today. Maybe it's fate and I should make offer on it! :)

LWO, I'm with cawaps, no way a dude will go for that wallpaper or the comfy chairs! The green in the armoire doesn't fly for me, but the I like the chest. Quite a collection on such a limited budget though. Where will the baby grand go??

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 12:48AM
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lee676

Gotta have a 1920s GE Monitor Top Refrigerator. Bonus points if you can find a double- or triple-door model. A surprising number of these are still in service - they're all but indestructable, and surprisingly efficient and easy to service, thanks to the compressor being right there on top in open view. Heat rises, so it makes sense to put the heat-producing components on top. Why don't they usually do it like this anymore?

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 1:47AM
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roarah

Cawaps, I love your color scheme built around the asian Tiger! I am not loving the backsplash combo tho, it is hard on my eyes where every thing else really pleases my sense of sight, but that is what juxtaposition is meant to do isn't it. I would love to some how use your fabric as a backsplash. Maybe copper sheets? Love the orange in the fabric with the other elements!

I have a question about how truely colorful were real 1920s homes. The illustrations are always very vivid but they are adverts. Just like our kitchens do not, in real life, resemble a clorox commercial's kitchen I think perhaps real 20s kitchens were not that bright. When I have toured 1920s mansions' orginal kitchens they are subdued except for tile work and they are also usually stained beautiful wood, expensive, so elite. I used only real photos not ads for my inspiration and they are not at all like the typical illistrations used to portray 20s kitchens. I wonder which is a truer representation of reality? I was trying to achieve an almost black and white photo with my mood board and was aiming at restraint but I am not sure if it is true to a 1920s home.
here are some of my inspirations

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 9:55AM
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writersblock

I love the style of those twenties ads, and they make me sigh for a time when everyone didn't want everything to be so industrial looking, but what i really want is a Kohler electric sink. :)

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 9:56AM
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marcolo

Roarah, I come from a city with tons of '20s houses. Based on what I remember from being in and out of people's kitchens and looking at tile and such, I'd say kitchens that were

- Earlier in the decade
- In larger homes where the servants still did the cooking
- In homes that were craftsman hangovers

were more likely to be rather plain.

Houses that were built in the later '20s in affluent but not rich areas were likely to be much more colorful. By the time you got to the '30s the kitchens and floors were really colorful, regardless of whether or not the cabs were white.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 10:22AM
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cawaps

Well, fortunately Sarah didn't invest too much in the backsplash (paint), so she can always re-do it. I was trying to get the 20s pastels. Any ideas on what would work better? Lighter, or even white background? Darker (terra cotta)? Go with blue shades instead of trying to pick up the floor colors?

Roarah, the question of whether the advertising posters were typical did cross my mind. I don't know the answer (hopefully our design experts will weigh in). Since your inspiration photos are in black and white, it's hard to tell how colorful they really are. The cabs in the first two are clearly not painted, so that's one less color, but the floors in the third and fourth photos could be the red & white one of Marcolo's last picture in the original post or something equally bright. Or not.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 10:36AM
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marcolo

One thing I remember clearly is the crazy linoleum. You'd see it stuck in weird places, or up in people's attics where it never got ripped up. Unfortunately we have no great substitute for that today, in that modern true linoleum is rather plain. Vinyl offers more pattern but I haven't seen much that really looks like it's from the era.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 10:50AM
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roarah

Thanks Marcolo, I am just a bit too young to have been in many 20s kitchens that had not been bastardized, oops, I mean modernized, and the one orginal left in my hood is quite plain with metal white cabs, a blue and white linoleum floor and a solid white linoleum counter, quite quiet but with a little bit of color. I am glad there were quite a few truly colorful kitchens back in the day!

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 11:03AM
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writersblock

have toured 1920s mansions' orginal kitchens

That's partly because a mansion or any large house with staff back then had a working kitchen, not the hearth-and-home kitchen of the middle classes.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 11:12AM
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eugenie11

I am a late-comer to this community (and loving every minute of it) and until reading this post, I never knew I had designed the ultimate cliche kitchen - white cabs, black granite counters, wood island, stainless appliances. The Little Black Dress of kitchen design.

But you know what? The reason the LBD became a cliche is because it WORKS. I am fashionable, design savvy, original and quirky as they come but when it came to re-doing my kitchen, I opted for simple, clean and tasteful. And most of all low-stress in the decision-making department. I have time-envy for all you folks out there who have the fortitude for all these decisions. I almost went round the bend over cabinet hardware (pulls? knobs? cup handles? All three?) I am also, alas, on a limited budget.

But even less time than money. Sigh. How do you guys do it?

Btw, one reason I love GW so much is that so many thorny decisions have already been made here! Love you guys!

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 12:08PM
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live_wire_oak

Yes, I agree that my kitchen is a little, um, pretty, for the average heterosexual huntin' n fishin' Skoal-packing moonshine-from-a-mason-jar-inbibing male inhabitant of my part of the world. ;) A plain microwave and fridge full of beer would be an ideal kitchen for that client. LOL! Luckily, my mythical guy is part of the performing arts community in the more tolerant PNW, and openly flies a rainbow flag outside of his lovely yellow cottage. :)

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 12:44PM
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mtnfever

somewhat on topic re the colorful or not-colorful discussion, my grandparent's house was built in the early '20s in the midwest (she wouldn't marry him until he had his own house so he built one) with the kitchen partially redone in the late '40s. I assume the redo was in the late '40s based on the fixtures I remember seeing in the '60s. The original bluish-gray linoleum which I don't remember if it was patterned or not and more-blue-than-gray wallpaper with small colorful birds and flowers stayed and the wall of pantry cabs were always white. So not too colorful. They were blue collar if anyone thinks that has a bearing.

The stove was an OKM type and the sink-on-metal-cabinets combo with wall cabs above. All white, of course. White tile with a black liner stripe between the sink and the wall cabs. From what I now know mostly from this forum, I assume these were the remodel items.

The refridgerator-with-a-hat (as I thought of it since I was *ahem* very young) wasn't replaced until it died in the early '60s. Actually, I think the "hat fridge" was also an upgrade when they got rid of the icebox that I remember being used as a pantry on the enclosed but unheated back porch.

thanks for indulging my trip down memory lane. And, from the other design thread, thanks for allowing me to realize that my parent's house was a Colonial Revival! Explains my abhorrence of hammered copper...

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 12:55PM
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greendesigns_gw

The tile floor that Roarah envisions is perfectly great modern interpretation of the 20's patterned linoleum craze. Great light fixture too!

I love Sochi's sink and whole color palette. It's cooly elegant, just as the intent was. I didn't see where a flooring material was indicated? Maybe a marmoleum in a soft blue or green?

The patterned linloeum inspiration piece in LWO's work is a perfect example of how color and pattern were celebrated, not feared. Love the cohesiveness of the entire space, and especially loving the genuine unfitted kitchen that could work as well today as it did in the kitchens of the time. And you can move everything to clean under it! LOL! There doesn't appear to be a lot of upper storage, so maybe add some open stainless steel restaurant shelving to pick up on the sink vibe?

I love that Cawaps went bold with the Asian Tiger and blue palette! It really does work together. Unfortunately, I don't think the blue counter with the blue cabinets goes together. Maybe the orangeyness of a Lumber Liquidators butcher block in natural cherry or another light cream or white laminate would work better?

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 1:18PM
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cawaps

GreenDesigns,

The laminate countertop reads as grey, not blue, on my monitor. I think I wanted just one neutral thing in the kitchen, but I may have missed the mark. (And I always reserve the right to change my mind when I see something in real life, because monitors do lie).

With this and this

This, this, this or this?

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 3:39PM
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marcolo

I think wood would look pretty cool.

Wish I weren't so dang busy this week. I want to see if it's possible to do this in a way that is still clearly inspired by the '20s but isn't so directly vintage--a bit more mainstream, I guess, but not necessarily using the typical mainstream solutions, colors, materials, etc.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 4:25PM
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sochi

Greendesigns - I included a floor in the mood board, but I didn't single it out. My first choice was Marmoleum, one of these colours:


But although I thought the Marmoleum would be in keeping with a '20s kitchen, I didn't think my professional couple would go for it in their modern remake. Also thought that it might be too "slavish". I chose instead a herring bone tile (meant to look like hardwood). I thought this would be nice with radiant floor heat underneath.

I don't think that herring bone hardwood is necessarily associated specifically with the 1920s, but I'm sure it wouldn't have been unheard of. Using tile and radiant floor heat seemed a modern alternative to flooring that I thought would work with the overall look.

I'd really love to do a glamour/modern version of a 1929 kitchen - ready for a New Year's Eve party to usher in the 1930s. More of a deco feeling. Am I allowed to do two assignments??

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 6:21PM
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lavender_lass

Hi everyone! My family lives in this house...a husband and wife with their two little girls (ages 6 and 9). They moved in last year and really love the brick and the trim color, too...so they left it as is. From 1920s kitchen project

Like many 1920s homes, the living room, dining room and sunroom (in back) are gracious sized and have wonderful details. The kitchen was remodeled some 15 years ago and has decent cabinets, an L-shaped banquette in the corner (which works well in the space) and lovely wood floors that go thoughout the first floor. Their only concern is that the kitchen doesn't match the style of the rest of the house. They want something more in keeping with the 1920s, rather than the wood cabinets and laminate counters, which seem out of place.

This Johnson Brothers Old English platter (a wedding gift) has the wife's favorite colors and she hopes they'll be appropriate to a 1920s style kitchen. When she found this lamp at an antique store last month (perfect for the sunroom) it looks like the colors will definitely work.

From 1920s kitchen project From 1920s kitchen project

The couple doesn't want to make any major changes to the kitchen, since the basics are in good shape. They also both enjoy cooking and baking...and don't want vintage appliances. All the little girls want is some pink in the kitchen, which is on the inspiration plate. So, the family has decided to approach the kitchen update by focusing on colors, finishes and accessories, which will hopefully be a fun twist on a 1920s home.

The existing cabinets will be painted green...similar to this 1920s desk they found for the girls' playroom. It's the same type of green as the 1920's photos they found on the internet..and look great with the aqua and pink. From 1920s kitchen project

The backsplash and countertops are going to be in this pink tile, which they found...after taking in this inspiration photo to the tile store. From 1920s kitchen project

With all the color, white appliances seem like the best choice. Although the appliances are all new (they needed an update) they found this sink at a big box store, which brings in a little period feel. ...

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 6:44PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Okay, I have not read any other posts so as not to be influenced. I will go back and read right after this post, though.

Narrative for plan:

"Red, White, and Bleu" 20's inspired kitchen

We have a 1922 Dutch colonial. My existing kitchen is not eat-in, but there is a sun porch and we plan to combine the two. The floor in the kitchen is ok but the sunroom is a mess, so we will just use a blue and white checkerboard tile throughout. We also removed all of the original butler's pantry cabinets to make way for a downstairs powder room. We will repurpose the cabinets for the kitchen, with a new ikea butcher block countertop They need to be stripped or repainted, but the wood underneath is poor quality. We are going to keep them white, but highlight the white cabinets in French blue. like the vintage example shown with red trim below, and use vintage red knobs.

My inspiration is my grandmothers tablecloth collection, specifically this cabbage rose piece (below) Luckily I have a lot of these. I plan to make cafe curtains for the sunroom, and a panel with red pompoms for the window over the sink

I chose the red fridge which , at $2000, was cheaper then panelling one, and more fun. The Bertazzoni range was a competitive price for the right shade of white. The vintage sink is paired with the least expensive chrome faucet that fit and had the built in soapdish I remember at my grandmom's.

My second inspiration is painted wicker; I found these two chairs for $235 the pair. I am looking for a wicker plant stand and more to go with them in the sun room/eating area. They will get ivory sumbrella seat cushions, and throw pillows from my vintage tablecloths and a blue and white stripe. And Boston ferns!
The deco oak pedestal table is a $350 bklyn ebay find, as are the chairs, which will get French blue paint and a cabbage rose tie cushion. Butcher block counters from ikea, a wall clock and the table bring in wood tones to tone things down a bit.

    Bookmark   November 14, 2011 at 11:37PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Wow, live wire oak. I was waiting for your to show me your homeowner's wardrobe, too! You went all out. Was the linoleum inspiration, did you say?

Lavender, do you have aqua, pink, and light green, all in your kitchen? Maybe the little girls had tooo much influence. Would you use all three?

Having worked on this, I think our client didn't tell us enough, or I need to read more closely. I felt so tempted to overdo the 20s thing, but I think we should just be inspired by it. Not creating a period piece. I am curious, of these designs, how many are ones you would like, and would do, if all the conditions were right? Maybe that should be a criterion.

I liked elements of my kitchen but taken all together it was overkill. But I worried if i didnt do enough, i would be accused of just using "pops" of 1920s. I didn't like any of the examples from the period; they were all too silly to me. Like big poofy princess wedding dresses. Or dollhouse kitchens. I ahad a hard time taming that.

The only thing I genuinely like and would do is this combo: red cabbage roses fabric paired with light blue and white striped fabric, and medium toned woods. I first saw that in a boy's nursery in a home i looked at buying over a decade ago, and I loved it.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 12:01AM
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lavender_lass

Mtnrdredux- Absolutely! I'm trying to bring in the storybook cottage theme, so it should be a little fairy tale, IMHO. When you say some of the 1920s rooms look like 'big poofy princess wedding dresses' that would be very feminine and pretty.

When I thought of aqua, apple green (for lack of a better term) and pink...it was to bring in the colors from the vintage kitchens. I actually have a few more pictures that I didn't post, but here they are...

Another example of the green cabinets with aqua wall (only above where I would have the pink tile backsplash). From 1920s kitchen project

For fabrics, on the windows and cushions for the banquette, I'd like to have some florals. I know they show some in the 1920s kitchens, but I didn't find very many examples. Most of the dresses at least, seem to be solid colors, with lots of lace, sheer fabrics like chiffon, bead work, etc. Here are a few examples...

This is supposed to be a 1920s damask and the pink looks like the right shade to me From 1920s kitchen project

And this may not be period appropriate, but the fringe looks good for the era. From 1920s kitchen project

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:38AM
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Angie_DIY

The clients are a couple who have lived in this 1928 house for nearly 20 years.

The kids are now out college and out of the house, and the clients would like to finally redo the kitchen; the previous owners gutted the kitchen in a 1982 renovation. Thus, the infrastructure is in good shape, but there are no vestiges of any the original kitchen. They like the layout, but the 1982 cabinets are falling apart, and the floor has many layers of cheap vinyl, etc. They decided to rip out everything except the walls, and to remove the old layers of flooring to get the floor height down closer to that of the adjacent hardwood floors.

There are no historic elements remaining in the kitchen, but they want it to match the tenor of the house. Their plan is to use a mix of period-appropriate themes constructed in rich, currently available materials, with a few vintage pieces if they can find/afford them.

They start with the floor: they want the visual warmth and beauty of natural stone. They also want to nod to 1920s design. They settle on this subtle reinterpretation of a red/white checkerboard linoleum floor, using alternating cream/salmon marble tile, set on the diagonal for visual interest.

They want moderately bright cabs. Although they prefer natural wood, they opt for painted cabs to keep with the 1920s theme; eschewing white, they go for pale yellow shaker cabs with some glass insets:

With the kids gone, they have become bigger cooks than previously. They want a powerful range that visually fits. They decide that a professional-style range looks "old" enough, but the material cannot be stainless steel. They opt for a Bluestar painted black with copper accents:

What about the other appliances? Stainless steel is out, and they feel that white won't really work with the rest of the color scheme. Essentially, this leaves black. But they are concerned that the refrigerator will leave a big "black hole" in the fridge wall. They opt for paneled DW and fridge, but choose to cover the panels in patinaed copper instead of yellow woodwork:

For the sink and countertops, they are a bit thrown.

They found this vintage Monel sink with drainboards:
.

It took some reworking of the layout, but they decided to go with it. However, they didn't want all stainless steel counters (a natural substitute for period-appropriate Monel). They decided to finish out the counters in soapstone. They...

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:46AM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Angie,

I like the idea of copper cladding the apps, that's something new! I imagine youd get real patina differences around the handles, but I would not mind that. I like your range choice. I would like to see something that ties the green, yellow and copper together. As for the tile pattern, is that 20s? I have no idea.

Lavender,
Would you personally want to live in a room that used all three of those colors? Would your DH. I am a colorphobe of course, but even so I think you need to edit one out. I love the apple green.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:59AM
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lavender_lass

Mtnrdredux- I can see we'll have to have palmiers and tea, at your house :)

No, I personally would not have pink tile in my kitchen...but I would have three or four colors in the space. I love morning glory blue with a warm white and kind of an amaretto wood tone. Add leaf green (plus lots of plants) light yellow walls, multiple fabrics with blue, pink...and of course, purple and lavender! I've always liked blue and purple with green and the pink and yellow warm it up a bit. Would it be quite so saturated with color? Probably not...but the other example kitchens we've done are not my style, either.

When we see pink tile, we probably think of ranch homes we've lived in or visited that had those 'dated' pink bathrooms. That wasn't the case in the 1920s...this was all new and exciting and a big change from the very neutral kitchens of the past. Color was finally available and affordable to people all over the country...the war was over...and people wanted to celebrate. I think it's the same reason we see all the color in the 1950s. Just my two cents :)

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 12:26PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Roarah,

I like your colors. A little different but livable. What exactly is that first piece? It looks very interesting. I like your tile and wallpaper, I am not sure if i like them together. I am awful at mixing patterns ( i can barely mix whites). The colors go well but I am not sure about one pattern being curvy and one being geometric. I also find patterns work better when they have a different scale, which I can't tell from your board. Of all the kitchen shown, your appeals to me the most overall.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 12:41PM
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cawaps

Angie, I like that you did a spanish colonial revival house--they make up a large proportion of the 1920s housing stock here, and I was thinking about doing a second design with that house type in mind. I like the yellow and green together. I have no idea whether the tile is period appropriate, but they seem like they *could* be, which in a 20s-inspired modern house is probably enough. The floor reads pinkish to me, which doesn't quite work with the copper. I think something similar but in slightly oranger tones would look better. Paneling the fridge and DW left the range as the only black element in the kitchen and it feels disconnected from the rest of the design, although if they oil the soapstone, it would address the issue.

With respect to Mtnrdredux' question on whether I could (would want to?) live with any of these, I think I could happily live with Roarah's, Sochi's, Live Wire Oak's, Angie's or the one I did. Of course, if I was doing them from scratch I would probably tweak a few things, but if I bought a house with those kitchens I could probably live with it indefinitely. Lavender Lass's pink tile counter and backsplash would be a hard sell for me, and the whole look is a bit too romantic for me. Mtnrdredux's is nice and I could probably live with it although the red, white and blue motif is not to my taste.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 1:08PM
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Angie_DIY

Thanks for the feedback, Mtn and cawaps.

I would like to see something that ties the green, yellow and copper together.

I can't say I disagree :-) I chose the color palette from the antiquehomestyle.com site that Marcolo pointed out (albeit I chose a 1930's scheme). The site describes it thus: "attractive rust, pale yellow, and sage green scheme with black accents." I had already been thinking of copper, and hoped I could sub patinaed copper for "rust." I also hoped the patina would contain a little green, as it often does.

What do you think of using some yellow tiles in with the green? Or perhaps green accents on the yellow cabs...

As for the tile pattern, is that 20s? I have no idea. Yeah, I don't either. I don't have any info that it *is*, I just liked the looks of it. Like cawaps said, I think it could be.

The floor reads pinkish to me, which doesn't quite work with the copper. I think something similar but in slightly oranger tones would look better. Agreed. In my mind's eye, the red tiles would be redder, maybe maroon (for a less subtle checkerboard) and they would match weathered copper better.
For what it is worth, I am thinking "old penny" copper rather than "just slightly oxidized" copper.

...leave the range as the only black element in the kitchen and it feels disconnected from the rest of the design

Excellent point. What "our couple" really wanted was a vintage copper Chambers range, if they could even find one, but they wanted more firepower and couldn't squeeze in a range larger than 30".

I have been following these threads, but feel so unqualified to make comments on others' designs. I am notoriously bad at colors and design. I also see how useful it is to have feedback, however, so I may take a crack at it. Accordingly, feel free to discount my opinions on your designs!

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 2:09PM
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marcolo

My "client" owns her own graphic design studio. Divorced, she lives with her fresh-out-of-college daughter who has returned home for a few years. She lives in a very common type of house for her area, a '20s colonial without major distinguishing features.

She's not entirely a vintage gal. She did stumble across a website showing 1920s linoleum ads, and loved the color combos and feminine vibe that seem so unusual today. But she's not one to hook up a 1927 gas Magic Chef, store her Wholefoods vegetables in a Monitor Top, or even fuss with a reclaimed sink. She might spring for a vintage focal point or two, but really just wants an all-new kitchen with a unique look. So that's what she gets:

I'd only use the blue fringed light fixture if it fell in the right spot, where the blue would fit. And it doesn't work with the green sconces, so one of them would have to go. But it was just way too cool not to show.

I know the Dalloway chair was used in another thread, but it's just too perfect. Every time a '20s husband came home, his wife had painted yet another piece of furniture a bright color. It intentionally is the only yellow thing in the room.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 2:50PM
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cawaps

Angie, to tie the colors together, you might think about encaustic tile or talavera tile. Someone on this board found encaustic floor tiles under their floor. I think it was in yellow, green and black but can't find the thread now.

Heres a couple of talavera examples:

And here's a link to some geometric patterns used for encaustic tile:

Here is a link that might be useful: Encaustic tile layout designs

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 3:24PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Marco,

I like your colors. First, I would compose a whole room just to buy that vintage chandelier. The wall paper does not work for me. Too bedroomy. Too girly. NOthing else is girly, even the chandy it more torch singer than girly. Subways? I like the blue but subways? Overall a subtle pleasant nod to the 20s

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 3:24PM
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marcolo

The wall paper does not work for me. Too bedroomy. Too girly.

You see it as girly and bedroomy through 2011 eyes! To me, design always seemed to swing back and forth between masculine and feminine. To grotesquely and inaccurately oversimplify, Greek Revival (M), Victorian (F, actually this period had internal oscillations but), Edwardian and Craftsman (M), '20s historic revival and early Art Deco (F), Streamline and Machine Age Art Deco (M). Midcentury on it gets more complex, and I think it's more about the environment. Pink bathrooms are certainly not masculine. If I thought about it, I'd probably be able to find much faster swings between the two as the century went on.

Oh, and that curtain valance with the violet pompoms looks pretty girly to me!

I think we're in a weird period right now. Part of the design market is driven by the Twilight set, who now have money to spend to create environments that are both ultra-feminine and also very little-girlish. Kitchens to me seem surprisingly masculine at the moment. The decline of the ultra-ornate corbeled and flounced kitchens of the late '90s and early zeroes left us with something very rectilinear and flat-chested.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 3:48PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Funny, you mention femininity. I think that's what i totally rejected about the old kitchens. And i was wondering how much of that look was trying to sell the scutwork of feeding a family by making it look purty.

I dont think the wallpaper is just an issue of 2011. I don't think ive ver seen prints like that in a kitchen of any era. They are usually smaller in scale, or sue fruits or veggies or teapots and such.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 4:09PM
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marcolo

Yes, it is oversized on purpose. Oversized seems to be the hallmark of "modern" wallpaper; some of the patterns are outright brontosaurian. I didn't want to simply resuscitate some twee vintage pattern.

Oh, and I meant to specify that I wanted the 4x4's for the Ann Sacks, not the subways.

I don't think the prettification of the kitchen had to do with selling the work so much as lifestyle improvements around cooking. Coal and wood stoves stink, make you sweat, make you dirty and make you cough. In the '20s the kitchen became a less grimy place because suddenly they were cooking with gas, to coin a phrase. Much cleaner and more pleasant. Plus fewer people were in service after WWI and servants became much more expensive. I do think many middle-class people had day maids but no longer was the kitchen the province of some perpetually-slaving cook. A kitchen had to be nicer if an accountant's wife was going to work in it.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 4:22PM
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lavender_lass

Marcolo- I absolutely love your wallpaper! It's period appropriate and looks amazing with the range and the floor. I don't think the feminine appeal of the 1920s is really understood by many of the people, today. It was a different time and as you said, there were such significant changes in kitchen appliances.

My grandmother used to talk about the day her mother switched out the old wood stove for gas. It made such a difference in how and what they were able to cook and bake. Summer kitchens were no longer necessary, for one thing. And then the icebox came into being and people could actually keep food cold...at home! This was a huge change in how people cooked and used their kitchens.

As you say, grimy black wood stoves with the heat and smoke you would associate with one...along with the convenience of gas (it just turns on!) was such a change. I don't think people realize how much that one factor changed how we use kitchens, today. Of couse, electricity had just recently come to many homes (especially rural areas) about the same time and washing machines were another huge change/improvement :)

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 4:36PM
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cawaps

I have been musing over pink kitchens, having seen so many in my reseach. It seems they were pretty common starting in the 20s at least through the 50s and possibly into the 60s. And now they are reviled. I wondered if it reflected the movement of women into the workforce and the fact that over the last 50 years kitchens have become far less the wife's exclusive domain, and more so with the trend of opening kitchens to other rooms in the house. It could just be normal oscillation, but I had trouble imagining pink kitchens coming back in popularity at their previous level. I was going to suggest the color pink for an upcoming design exercise to see if anyone could make a pink kitchen palatable to mainstream contemporary homeowners. But maybe we're collectively still on the rebound.

Marcolo, I found it ironic that after your admonitions, you were the one to use white cabinets (not to imply your kitchen looks anything like the OTK) and subways (you really should have remembered to mention you wanted the 4x4s). I like your design, but like mtnrdredux, the wallpaper isn't really working for me, although the problem isn't in scale, color, or girliness. It reminds me of the 80s (so neither contemporary nor 1920s).

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:26PM
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jterrilynn

I'm a Hollywood starlet on the rise and I don't know nuten about birthin no babies and decorabatrations.

I just want this pretty shade of periwinkle blue but my decorator keeps looking at me like this.

Gosh, doesn't she know I have enough to worry about?

I'm not sure how to work this thing but I saw it at my friend Harold Lloyd's house so I want one.

Aren't these pretty?

I'm going to have a little sink made out of this for my maid to wash her hands in (with real plumbing). My doctor let me have it.

This is my nook and my seat cushions I'm having made.

I can get this nook light in just the right size.

NOW I Just need to know how to make this stuff from my favorite restaurant
.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:27PM
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roarah

I wish to take another stab at a 20s kitchen but this time in a spanish style home in LA. I hope to create a higher end totally unfitted kitchen this time. Not sure if it would function but hope it could. One full wall would house floor to ceiling niches, think phone niche x10. Their trim work would be painted a mellow yellow. The adjacent wall would house a sink stand like the one in my board but with a copper sink. On both sides of this would be free standing counter islands with stone tops, as shown in my board. Next would be a stove with the copper hood shown and next to this is another cast iron stone counter height table. the floor is mexican tile with yellow and blues. on another free wall is the fridge surrounded by built into a wall cabs with arched glass, like pic2 in board, and flanked on each side by mexican bookcases with bottom doors. In the middle is an extra long mexican table. My only issue is how to include a dish washer any ideas?
Sorry again I used a lot of wood and masculine finishes but I am not striving for authentic just trying to create a 1920s spanish vibe and feel with out using to many painted finishes.


    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:44PM
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palimpsest

Here's mine. 1920s-1930s catalog house.

Mine would be a kitchen with regular appliances, except perhaps white, white porcelain sink, and everything readily available except two specific pieces, one of which would be available but expensive, the other which is a piece of fine art, which could be something completely different or considered outside the kitchen budget. This is because I could not do a completely deco-redux kitchen when it came to the decor aspects.

Paper from Bradbury and Bradbury

Forbo flooring body color:

With border:
In: and a light gray or the body color.

Countertops, Corian Slate:

Cabinets of this style: in a pale gray:
With this hardware: (Berenson)

And a wall exhaust fan like this thrown in for good measure:
(Laurelhurst Fan Company)

Table and Chairs by Alvar or Aino Aalto

With glass and nickel toggle switches for the lighting: (Forbes and Lomax)

Here is where I veer off:
I would probably do a more modern fixture, like this one by Venini:
And I liked this Pierre Cardin sideboard:

And I would probably do a large food or still-life painting to get away from the near monochromatic palette.
This grocery store is by Marc Trujillo:

Some of the grays seem a bit off and I might tweak...

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:45PM
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jterrilynn

Yikes! My wall cabinet is meant to be white but it didn't show up like that.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:45PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Palimpsest - I had an exhaust fan like that in mine, but I thought everyone would tell me it was not up to code! I would love one of those.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:55PM
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marcolo

jterrilynn, very cute. Can you link to your floor, wall tile and paint color so we can see it better? Sometimes these mood boards lose some resolution.

cawaps, nope. It's not 1980s. That was the era of 1) New Wave weirdness or 2) picayune tiny little prints like those tiny dots on blue backgrounds or 3) big flouncy chintz patterns. It's very now. If you bought all the overscaled floral abstract wallpaper on the market today, you could cover China with it.

It would be pretty close to 1920s if it were on a tiny fussy scale.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:55PM
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conchitaFL

On the femininity of pink: It didn't use to be considered completely a girl-only color. That's a relatively recent development. Yes, the idea of pink for girl babies and blue for boys has been around a long time, but in the olden days that didn't mean that was a lifetime track. Look at blue, for instance. Nobody says that blue is always masculine today.

I'm reminded of a novel I've been reading lately (The Flowering Thorn by Margery Sharp, if anyone's interested). The main character has adopted a small boy and she's been thinking about how stolid and ordinary he is and that he will probably wind up being a policeman, and then she's contemplating the need for new linens, "some of those new colored towels. How Pat (the boy) would love a pink towel...". That's from a book published in the early 1930s. That's just one example.

Excessive genderization of decor and colors is our hangup, not theirs back then.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 5:58PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

Of course it cultural too, pink is the navy blue of India

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:12PM
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roarah

Mtnrdredux, The furniture is an armoire for clothes:). I think it might also be referred to as a dressing wardrobe.
I do think I would incorporate many of the ideas and color schemes used in this thread. I tried to approach the "assignment" loosely and not recreate a perfect copy of a 20s kitchen but to redefine the 20s in modern terms. It is a feeling that I can not articulate but know when I see it:)

Speaking of which, I think, marcolo, your board does a good job of reinterpreting that vibe in a modern setting. But I do not like white painted furniture, just a personal preference, so I wish the island was a different finish:) Love the lighting and the lavanders.

Angie I love your back splash tile idea! But not digging your floor as much:(. But overall I really like your room!

LL and mtnrdredux your boards are very literal interpretations of a 20s kitchens. I think you hit the 20s on the head but took it a little too far to fit in middle american 2011 homes. They are perfect stage sets tho:)

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:14PM
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palimpsest

I would have a real exhaust hood for the range.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:27PM
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lavender_lass

Roarah- Thank you...I did try to make it very 1920s because I wanted to achieve the look, without relying on the Hotpoint range, vintage sink and icebox for effect. Those all look great, but aren't always practical.

FWIW, I think the pink tile from the advertisement I used is much prettier than the 1950s version, which we're more used to seeing. It's actually two shades of pink (or so it seems) and the lighter version I might consider using in a bathoom, especially as an accent tile. I saw a nice 'magazine' bathroom, where the hex tiles on the floor were white with pink accents...and it was very pretty :)

I am surprised by the popularity of neutrals sometimes and I think we're about due for a resurgence of color. You can see it with the quartz countertops and some of the other new materials. It will be a nice change, IMHO, but I am a bit of a romantic.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:33PM
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jterrilynn

Sorry about the bad pixie's on my floor and wall photo's Marco.
Here is the picture that started the inspiration.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:35PM
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marcolo

I couldn't find those pulls on the Berenson site. They're cool. The Trujillo fills me with the same existential dread I experience whenever I walk into any real big box store, but I get the idea.

roarah, I think whenever you pick an old Spanish revival object, it's pretty much going to be from the '20s, so the authenticity is kind of automatic. The overall look is a little heavy, though.

OMG I am so sorry I showed a picture of white cabs and subways! You have to grant, they are used to very different effect than the OTK. Although at this point, having seen how well everybody has behaved themselves so far, perhaps we should formally open up the invitation to post some white-cab kitchens. But no OTKs!

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:42PM
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lavender_lass

I just wanted to say, I haven't critiqued anyone's kitchen and it's not because they're not interesting or even wonderful. I've just had a completely terrible weekend and I don't trust myself to be at my best (and most positive) for making suggestions. There are some very nice examples and I look forward to seeing more :)

Not to be mysterious...but if you want to know more, I did post something on the Conversations side of the Smaller Homes forum. I didn't want to hijack the thread, but I did feel bad not responding to people, who critiqued mine. I hope we do another thread next week, too. Any ideas?

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:44PM
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palimpsest

Oops they are B and M

Here is a link that might be useful: B and M art deco pulls

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 6:58PM
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jterrilynn

I'm not going to critique anyone's kitchens because I do not know enough about 1920's style. I am going mention my favorite here so far though. My very favorite kitchen is the first kitchen at the top posted by roarh. Also, I really like all the lighting in Sochi's post. I want the gold/brass chairs in livewire's post. Love the sink Angie posted. I was looking for a sink like that for the zinc counter I posted. In pal's post I love the border, exhaust fan and sideboard.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 7:21PM
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cawaps

"Jazz Age" in the title of the thread made me look for vintage advertising posters. I found this, which will look great on the wall of my modern, 1920s-inspired kitchen.

I wanted to do basically a modern kitchen, pulling in some 1920s elements. I started with the floor, where I will reproduce this linoleum pattern using different sizes of gray tile. Working up, I opted for gray shaker cabinets, because I didn't want to be jeered at for choosing white.

But with custom stained glass in the uppers like this, only more gray and less blue

Counter is red eros Silestone & backsplash is Studio Moderne Paramount tile (shown in the bathroom below), which has always looked a little Deco to me

Paint




    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 8:08PM
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marcolo

sochi, what is that icebox thingie?

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 8:12PM
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roarah

Cawaps that is all that! I love your design. It is so orginally right!

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 8:14PM
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palimpsest

I looked back and saw Sochi's icebox after I had uploaded these and the information on the same so here they are:

These are by Meneghini, an Italian company and they are essentially Italian "coachwork" on a Liebherr refrigerator. These happen to be lacquered wood.

They are VERY expensive, roughly double the price of Liebherr, if you convert from pounds to dollars, with the one that Sochi posted at $10,000+ and the double at $12,000 not including delivery to the US

The single is basically the 24"x 24" combo with bottom freezer and the double is all fridge on one side all freezer on the other. The door works on one of those complicated sliding hinge things since the real door is inside. You could probably get a cabinet maker to do this for much less than the price of one of these delivered, but they would really have to know what they are doing to get the door to work.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 9:10PM
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marcolo

This is a regular Samsung fridge skinned by a guy in LA who works in special effects for Hollywood. Did it for himself with materials he had, though he sent out for final paint and plate. The little doors are fake except for the little one on the left, which opens to reveal the ice and water dispenser.


The conventional wisdom is that Euro design is much more mod than American tastes, but when Europeans do vintage, they really do it up.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 9:18PM
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sochi

Okay, just one more.

Young couple, 29, Zoya and Jorge. Just started their careers a couple of years ago. They just bought their first place, an apartment in a converted office building built in 1929. They got a pretty good deal on the apartment, as it isn't in the "trendiest" part of Montreal. The kitchen is smallish, which allows them to splurge on a couple of items, but overall the renovation has to be affordable. They will keep the existing thin plank hardwood and use the existing cabinet shells with new doors. They want a thoroughly modern kitchen, but one that retains a sense or echo of 1929. The galley kitchen has decent light as well.

Here is the building:

They were inspired by a Samovar they picked up in Petersburg:

And by the colours in this great Constructivist poster which will be on the wall in their eat-in nook:

And opted for this colour scheme:

New doors for the existing cabinet boxes, MDF doors:

Uppers are Ikea cabinets, with a DIY deco stencil on the glass:

They don't need a full size oven, so to save money and space they opted for discounted floor model Miele speed oven:

They'd love this fridge, but they will probably have to settle for the red Amana fridge

Silestone counters from Home Depot:

Awesome backsplash tile:

Karbon faucet (deal on ebay) with a regular SS sink:

Modern interpretation of a grandfather clock:

For the nook, a cheap round IKEA table:

Paired with a Marimekko table cloth

And black tub chairs:

Plus of course, fabulous black and red tango shoes for the lady of the house:

Here is a link that might be useful: Appropriate Music for...

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 10:57PM
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sochi

I forgot to include lighting. You can see the IKEA light fixture over the table in the mood board, pot lights in the rest of the kitchen.

Yes, those European fridges/ice boxes are a little expensive, but aren't they awesome? Assume they didn't have to pay shipping...

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:04PM
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marcolo

Ah-hem. Someone is peaking ahead to our 1930s chapter! But good job on echoing another era with almost all modern items!

I think it's time for a '20s white kitchen. There, I said it.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:09PM
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Angie_DIY

Cawaps: I love the jazzy red kit. Everything really seems to hang together.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:09PM
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jterrilynn

I could not live in a red, white and black kitchen but WOW to the two boards above.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:18PM
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sochi

Marcolo, I'm shocked. Too much colour for you? Okay, but who will do the white kitchen? I did say the building was built in 1929..., so yes, I edged into the '30s just a tad.

roarah - great second kitchen. I really like that sink and frame. Overall the kitchen feels too heavy for me and I'd need a little more colour.

cawaps - ah the studio moderne paramount tile. I've pretty much decided on it (or the Heath Ceramics Oval) for my fp. But, I'm having trouble getting a sample of the paramount tile. ARgh. Thanks for using it, it is fantastic!

pal - you've posted my favourite items so far I think. The wallpaper is fabulous, especially with your flooring choice. The light fixture makes my heart sing.

    Bookmark   November 15, 2011 at 11:37PM
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marcolo

I'm not color-phobic. But I think one of the hopes of these threads is to influence the way GWebbers design their kitchens. I'd love to show people who live in '20s houses who like white cabinets (or light-painted cabinets, like yellow or pale turquoise, maybe) how NOT to put an Edwardian OTK in a '20s house, even if they're not specifically going for "vintage."

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 9:10AM
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palimpsest

Here was my original fixture for over the sink area. I think this drove the project into more of a facsimile 20's kitchen with new appliances though so I skipped it and went with a MCM fixture that riffed of the flowers in the wallpaper.

So whats next?

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 10:41AM
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marcolo

Well, with this thread, have we come up with a kitchen a GW'er might actually implement, or not yet?

In terms of next topics--I vote for either a material that your average GWer would not use in a kitchen, or try to make everything else rigid and neutral if they did; OR, if we do styles again, an updated "Tuscan"/old world kitchen.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 11:07AM
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lavender_lass

Marcolo- I don't think most GW'ers are ready for a lot of color. Many seem much more comfortable with neutrals and a splash of color.

While something like the apple green I used would look great on an island with wood top...similar to this combination... From 1920s kitchen project

And maybe wood or white perimeter cabinets with an apple martini quartz countertop with mosaic tile backsplash... From 1920s kitchen project From 1920s kitchen project

Most people would probably think it's too much color...and even hesitate to use the apple green as a wall color, with white cabinets...which would also look great with that glass mosaic From 1920s kitchen project

And would probably feel quite daring settling for a 'pop of color' like this mixer... From 1920s kitchen project

For the next project, I vote for updated old world kitchen!

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 12:24PM
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amarantha

Hello All,
I just wanted to chime in that these have been really great, very informative and enlightening. So thanks to all that put such great thought and a good amount of time in putting these together. I can see myself using some of these -either some of the items/resources in the kitchens and also using the story board idea itself as a tool for future work to be done in our kitchen. I have lots of clipped pieces but putting them together in a document really helps. I love color and wood and stone and... it's just putting them all together that I need help with.
And to add -those amazing refrigerator fronts above- I've got a fridge that needs panels and I don't want to hide it or make it look like it's part of the cabinetry but might want to make it look like an older ice box or early refrigerator. This has given me ideas and I'm sure there are more out there.

Marcolo, I think with this thread (and the Colonial revived one too) there are certainly elements/kitchens that could be used in the current time. Personally, I would love to see a "design around" copper or other metals. Not everything metal but maybe just some really cool copper hood or refrigerator covered in a sheet metal. Not every one's style I know. And marrying of metals too - how to combine the copper with chrome or stainless steel. So many people ask all the time about mixing finishes of faucets, hardware, lighting.

Anyway just thoughts,So thanks and looking forward to more.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 12:45PM
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cawaps

Clearly, I have too much time on my hands. Here is a 3rd attempt, with white cabinetry. It is basically the OTK with tile wainscoting in blue and brown and pulling in the blue in the hutch and fabrics. Is it sufficiently 1920s?

Cute 1924 Seattle house.

Tile wainscoting kind of like this

But I want to use blue 4x4 tiles for the field and the trim in chocolate brown

Walnut countertops on white inset shake cabs.

Linoleum tile floor, patterned in smoky quartz and coffee, and off-white paint color

Hutch and some fabric choices for curtains and upholstery

Lighting

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 2:48PM
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palimpsest

i vote for the unusual material this time. how about if we each look for something and we can pick one of them. i picked the agate, so maybe i should abstain, or at least it should not be a material like that. something is the matter with the shift button on this keyboard.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 3:30PM
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marcolo

I like, cawaps. However, I would bet that the typical GWer thinks "light" and "airy" are synonyms for "good," so the color scheme might be a little dark for them.

You are onto something with swapping out the counters and backsplash. To me those are the key elements that make the OTK an anachronism in a '20s house, as well as a "kit" with an expiration date stamped on it.

Are we moving onto Tuscan next? Is that the feeling, or am I misreading? Who's the hapless volunteer who will kick it off?

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 3:31PM
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Angie_DIY

Cawaps: I like it. I have only two concerns, and one is frivolous. One concern: will the tile wainscoting look too much like, uhh, a bathroom? Or is/was that a normal scheme for kitchens, too?
Second one: brown and blue has never been a favorite. Now, it makes me think of wires in European electrical cords. (Brown is the hot wire, in case you ever need to know! :^)

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 4:37PM
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jterrilynn

Marco do you mean the American fake Tuscan or Tuscan region of Italy? It seems like it would be a better learning experience to study the region and culture of Tuscany and come up with real kitchen examples of the people who live there. Or, mix our fake with the real for a look?

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 5:24PM
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marcolo

I'm thinking fake Tuscan. Looking at real Tuscan kitchens would be an option for inspiration.

What I mean is, I think these threads are most helpful if they offer alternatives for real problems. One was about colonial revivals--most common house style in many parts of the country. This is about '20s kitchens, which is what a lot of people have in older cities.

But what do you do if you love Tuscan kitchens, when everybody tells you that your oversized corbels/faux-finished walls/roosters are dated and tacky (which they are)?

I think we should drill down into why people liked/like them. The warmth, the (somewhat prepackaged) sense of family, the focus on food or the love of Italian things. I think the Old World style kitchen is doomed to make a return someday, and there's got to be a better way of doing it.

So somebody could make a design based on actual Tuscan (or Italian) kitchens if they wanted. But I don't think it's 100 percent necessary to solve the problem.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 5:39PM
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cawaps

Marcolo and Angie, thanks for the kind words. I am having way too much fun with this.

"Will the tile wainscoting look too much like, uhh, a bathroom?" I'm not sure what modern remodelers will think, but in the two galleries of vintage kitchens Marcolo linked to, there are a bunch of kitchens will partly or completely tiled walls, and a few more that have a chair rail with the lower wall painted or possibly papered a contrasting color. I've seen lots of vintage kitchen with tile in person, although in modern kitchens tile seems mostly reserved for the backsplash.

Marcolo, I tried doing brown & cream tile with blue on the walls to keep the harder-to-change elements neutral. But I didn't like it as well (I played with Benjamin Moore's Color Viewer to get a sense of balance and proportion). A lot of kitchens don't have very much wall without cabinets, so the overall effect might not be that dark (upper wall and cabinets are white). Probably not "light and airy," though. The blue and brown are going to ground it.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 6:01PM
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marcolo

Apologies, I completely overlooked palimpsest's reply--we must have been cross-posting. Off to find an unusual material!

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 6:16PM
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sochi

I'd also prefer using an unusual material rather than faux Tuscan. Faux Tuscan scares me a bit.

How about knotty pine? A challenge for sure, but I'm also starting to see it more.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 6:29PM
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cawaps

I like the idea of reinventing Tuscan, but I think for this round I would prefer to pick an object and see how many different styles people can work it into. It's still constrained but in a different direction.

I suggested earlier that we might do the color pink, because it was so very popular for kitchens and so very unpopular now. How would you make it work in a contemporary kitchen?

As for objects, I have too many ideas (that seems to be my pattern lately). If I have to pick just one to suggest, I think I'd go with the linoleum Litho (B/W) below.

Vetrazzo?

Back-painted glass?

Unusual tile (all Ann Sacks, available in multiple colors; we could let people choose the color or we could specify)

Wacky linoleum?

Laminate, not imitating stone?

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 6:40PM
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palimpsest

I would be up for "tasteful Tuscan" at some point in the future:)

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 7:06PM
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enduring

Looking forward to the unusual material this time and getting back to a tasteful Tuscan next time. How about that vote from me it is counts from one who has only observed.

BTW I love color, there is no bad color, its all about the relationship. That's my color philosophy.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 7:29PM
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enduring

I don't know what I trying to write in that second sentence! I think I need to go fix supper.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 7:34PM
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skyedog

Another observer comment/idea - how about metal cabinetry? So practical yet so underused.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 7:47PM
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sochi

Back to an earlier question: do any of you observers or posters think you'd like a kitchen similar to any of the kitchens posted? Elements you really like and might try to use? Do they make you want to embrace more colour, or run away from it screaming? Are they practical at all?

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 7:57PM
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marcolo

Good job, cawaps. I'm kind of mentally stuck even with what kind of material to look for. I did run across some items I wish I'd seen for this thread.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 8:05PM
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ideagirl2

Lavender, do you have aqua, pink, and light green, all in your kitchen? Maybe the little girls had tooo much influence. Would you use all three?

Mtnredux, I'm not LavenderLass but I certainly would! It's certainly a girly color combo, but if anything it's slightly restrained, for the late 1920s. It's all pastels, colors we currently think of as "going together"--a lot of kitchens and especially baths from that era have at least three colors if not more, and in shades that we no longer think of as going together. Here's an example--peach and burgundy(!):

My big question for Lavender is where she found those gorgeous light fixtures...

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 8:56PM
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ideagirl2

i was wondering how much of that look was trying to sell the scutwork of feeding a family by making it look purty.

Another way of looking at that is trying to make feeding a family more cheerful and pleasant by making it pretty. If you're going to spend so much time in that room, it feels better if the room is pretty...

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 9:03PM
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lavender_lass

Ideagirl2- Thank you! Nice to see someone else loves color, too. I wanted something girly and pretty, for a Storybook cottage of the late 1920s.

Here's the link :)

Here is a link that might be useful: Link to 'gorgeous light fixtures'

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 9:50PM
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skyedog

To answer Sochi's question, I think overall, the kitchens got a little to vintagy for me. And I live in a 100 yr old house. If the utility rooms of a house don't have the original elements to work with it's so hard to recreate them and make it work. I prefer a simpler interpretation of a period kitchen - one that uses modern appliances and more traditional looking light fixtures. Something easy to clean. Nothing overly eclectic.

I already have a colorful kitchen and house so I don't need to be sold on that. I was surprised there wasn't a red/white kitchen with yellow and jade accents. It's more 40's but it works so well and no one really knows period colors anyway.

I thought about proposing a plum colored cabinet scheme with the Cafe de Paris copper engraving set from Winchester Tile in the back splash - maybe a teal ceiling to set it off - but it would take me a week just to get it all posted correctly.

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 10:50PM
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mtnrdredux_gw

I wouldn't want any of these, including the one I did. I thought of the exercise more as being a designer and having to do what your client wants, not necessarily what you like.

But there are many elements I really love here. Marcolo's fringe chandelier, LavLass' apple green sideboard, Pal's exhaust fan (but its probably useless IRL, no?), the Italian icebox, the white sink on the teak(?) pedestal, roarah's tile, the chocolate aga, just to name a few. This exercise does bring out some new and fun elements that are a little different from "pick which one of these seventeen nickel cargo lights you like".

(just for the record, i do like nickel cargo lights)

    Bookmark   November 16, 2011 at 11:32PM
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marcolo

I liked many of the kitchens. Whether I'd install one would depend on the house--it would still to flow with the rest of the space in some way.

There are many, many ways to approach "vintage." If you like patina, quirkiness and a sense of layering, that's one feel. If you just want inspiration from the colors and elements of an earlier era, that's different. It's especially complicated with an era like the '20s, I think. It was so varied. Five years earlier, women were dressing like Kate Winslet in "Titanic." Suddenly their chests are flat and their hair is in short pincurls. A lot of entirely new aesthetics seemingly emerged out of nowhere during a few short years. Which aesthetic you pick makes a big difference. Remember, a lot of the RH industrial decay look is based on the '20s, too. And we didn't seem to touch that aspect at all.

I do hope that at least just once we can point someone to this thread to stop him or her from installing a 2003 version of a 1900 scullery in a 2011 kitchen because they think it's "timeless."

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 12:06AM
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greendesigns_gw

Unusual materials...hmmmm...not exactly a "material", but it is a uncommon "inspiration piece" that I'm working with right now for a project. It's giving me a headache and I'm working late, mostly because of the constraints that the client has me working under. :(

Teak, rosewood, and walnut dining table by Milo Baughman

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 4:05AM
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enduring

Greendesigns, Is this table going in a kitchen or a dinning room? It's pretty.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 10:45AM
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enduring

How tall are the ceilings? You could hang it upside down and make it into a light fixture.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 10:50AM
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greendesigns_gw

Apologizing for the hijacking...

It's the centerpiece in the dining room, which is the center of the open concept plan. But the client wants the One True Kitchen, and doesn't really want white anywhere else because of the wish for color on the walls and the perceived maintenance and lack of wear with white furniture. Pulling your hair out yet? LOL! I'm trying to convince her that we need some white furniture elsewhere, or else eliminate the white shaker kitchen in favor of wood. I've got plenty of ideas, but they keep getting shot down!

Dining chairs? Hmmmm..


Leather is easy to keep clean, right? Even white leather?

I do love the suggestion to make it a light fixture. LOL! That's a riff on one of my ideas to have a shaped soffit with recessed lighting in a wood veneer over the kitchen island, but "that's too dark".

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 11:28AM
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palimpsest

Milo Baughman is one of those MCM designers I like partly because their work veers from classic to ugly and back again. (I think Wormley, Paul Evans, and Karl Springer fit here too). I have a Baughman Parsons table in burl, and 3 Trends II T-back chairs.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 12:20PM
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cawaps

So the kitchen is OTK and the rest of the house is supposed to be colorful MCM? Small wonder you're pulling your hair out.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 1:30PM
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marcolo

Any more ideas on the next thread? Who volunteers to start it?

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 7:36PM
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jterrilynn

I volunteer cawaps or sochi.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 7:55PM
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cawaps

I'll volunteer. Has there been a consensus on any particular material? Otherwise I will probably go with one of the ideas from my post (I'm leaning toward the Croco linoleum or the Beluga Formica).

I'll probably post it on Saturday, so if you want to weigh in before then, please do.

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 10:30PM
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marcolo

Cool. Please remember to repost the rules from my bulleted list, or at least the ones that apply (homework not needed here). Those were all responses to people's input.

GreenDesigns, can you get your client to at least do one of the woods from the table as a countertop?

    Bookmark   November 17, 2011 at 11:02PM
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ideagirl2

To answer Sochi's question, yes, I really like this. Which ones would I want to live in? Let's see... Roarah's; Sochi's; Cawaps' first one; and possibly Marcolo's and LavenderLass's.

I love me my 20s kitchens!

And now here's my shot... a French art deco 1920s kitchen:

The floor, which has radiant heat (the whole house is heated with radiators), is ceramic tile in burgundy and sky blue with green and yellow piping (this floor is actually from 1931... two years late... so sue me! Haha).

And here's a closeup so you can see the colors better:

The walls have tile wainscoting roughly like this:

...except in a combination of blue subways, black stripes at the top and bottom and a one-inch stripe of Mission Tile West's "Falling Leaf" deco liner located just over 3" (one row of subways plus grout) below the top black stripe. Here's the deco liner (ideally the putty-colored parts of this would be cream to resonate with the floor tile):

The field tile:

The cabinets are pale yellow with furniture feet and feminine shapes:

The counters might be a golden-toned butcherblock (similar to but lighter than the floor in that cabinet photo), but I'm not sure. For some reason, counters are always the hardest for me.

The range, of course, would be my range:

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 12:24PM
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ideagirl2

Oh, and I forgot, the sink would be my sink:

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 12:29PM
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marcolo

That's great. I've never seen anybody here use or refer to Crown Point's transitional line. It could be seen as slightly cartoony but has a cute retro feel.

Why not use it in your kitchen?

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 12:44PM
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lavender_lass

I like the cabinets...are they the Crown Point? They would look good, in your kitchen. The color seems right, too. Are you still thinking about faux soapstone? It looks like a good combination :)

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 1:42PM
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ideagirl2

Why not use it in your kitchen?

Because it would cost right about twice as much as what the Amish charge. But isn't it great? I love it.

It's frameless, BTW, which I mention because I know many people here go nuts for frameless. :-)

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 1:50PM
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jterrilynn

ideagirl, where did you find the first floor tile picture? I was looking for something like that for my idea's but could not find anything. I really like that floor.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 1:52PM
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ideagirl2

Lavender, you're right--I saw a picture of these cabinets somewhere with soapstone counters. It looked just fantastic. I was in LOVE! The counter had a regular eased edge, and that simplicity was great, since the cabs have enough curves themselves.

I'm sure they would look fantastic and I would love them, but they would cost about $20k. (I got a quote for my layout.) I know that's not a huge amount by some people's standards, but it is by mine.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 1:55PM
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ideagirl2

Jterrilyn, that floor is actual antique tile I saw on The Antique Floor Company's site (see link below). They're a French company based in Burgundy. This particular floor sold a good while ago (understandably). It was, quote, "recovered from a town house in the Champagne region of France." I'm sure it wasn't cheap, and shipping it from Burgundy to the US would also not be cheap.

There are several close-ups at the website that you could use to recreate this tile, if you had infinite money. :-)

Here is a link that might be useful: French antique floor tile at the Antique Floor Company

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 2:00PM
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lavender_lass

Oh, I'm not that in love with the cabinets (although they're very nice) I was thinking the COLOR would be perfect for your kitchen...to go with the laminate faux soapstone. It would be beautiful with your range and sink. Have you looked at your kitchen post, lately? Did you see the link to Mama goose's kitchen...and the jadite? Just some ideas :)

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 2:03PM
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ideagirl2

Yeah, the color of those cabinets is fantastic. I swoon! Am I wrong, though, to be still fixated on this belief that stained wood is better for resale? It also is, indisputably, better at hiding dirt. But... I waver... I mean, maybe stained wood is generally better for resale, but a kitchen that actually looks RIGHT for the house, even though that means painted, is equally good?

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 4:56PM
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lavender_lass

Go with the paint! As you said, if people don't understand the bathrooms, they won't get the kitchen either...and don't deserve your house! :)

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 6:25PM
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jterrilynn

Thanks for the site ideagirl, I do not think I have ever had such inspiration from pictures of tile before. A persons mind could really get on a run.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2011 at 11:28PM
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Angie_DIY

Ideagirl: This thread caused me to waver on the wood-vs-paint issue, too. I love wood, eschewed paint. (I have no concerns about resale. I couldn't even guess which would be better for resale.) Then my idea board upthread had me say, "Hmmm. I like that look!"

    Bookmark   November 19, 2011 at 10:55AM
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