Induction teppanyaki Q.

eleenaSeptember 10, 2012

I know that AEG Electrolux has one but the rest are electric, as far as as I know. However, AEG is 36" and I need a 12"-15" unit.

I am sure someone will come up with it sooner or later but is it worth waiting for?

The electric ones use a lot of electricity, probably, but the new models will probably be very expensive at first, so I won;t be saving any $$$.

Thoughts?

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Angie_DIY

Is there any reason to think that using induction to heat the cooking surface will be more efficient than using conventional heaters?

For induction hobs, the US DOE rates induction as more efficient (84% absolute efficiency) than conventional disk elements (74.2% absolute efficiency). Thus, you may expect to use ~12% less electricity with induction.

However, much of this has to do with the fact that induction doesn't waste heat warming anything but your pot, i.e., won't heat the surface of the cooktop or the surrounding air. In the case of a teppanyaki, the whole point is to heat your cooktop (in this case, a literal "cooktop.") You may save a little from not having to heat the thermal mass of the heating elements themselves, but I wouldn't expect big savings here. In short: not worth waiting for induction.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2012 at 2:28PM
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weedmeister

An induction teppanyuki would not be using resistance elements to heat the surface.

IIRC, some company in Europe was producing an induction oven. It used a cast iron bottom that was heated with induction.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2012 at 4:15PM
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eleena

In a hob, the element below the glass surface is producing an electromagnetic field that "works" on your cookware if it close enough.

The entire teppanyaki surface serves as a large "pan" in a way.

It is not heating itself, something is heating it, right?

If it is induction, then again, the elements are producing electromagnetic fields to heat the surface while with regular electric, they are "coils" of a sort, aren't they?

    Bookmark   September 10, 2012 at 6:54PM
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