converting range

brandonrDecember 21, 2012

I will be replacing an electric range and hood with a gas range and microwave hood. The range is on a 40amp circuit currently. I am not sure which circuit the hood is on, but I am fairly certain it is not a dedicated circuit. The LG appliances I will install specify separate 20amp circuits for each appliance. Given where the breaker box is in my house, it is very difficult to run a brand new circuit from the main breaker box to the kitchen.

Is it easiest to take the existing 40amp wiring into a sub breaker box for 2 20amp circuits? Or can I wire both appliances on the same circuit with the old wiring and change the breaker to 20amps? I know that a gas range is not going to pull 20amps from the wall, but I am trying to respect what the instructions (and code) says.

If I need to install a sub breaker box, what does the code say regarding location of that box? Is it code to put it in the attic? Or does it have to be reachable from somewhere inside the house?

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ron Natalie

If it were just the range, you could just drop the breaker size down to 20A and use the existing wiring most likely. With the microwave hood if indeed the existing fan is on a shared circuit, you may not have enough to power the microwave/hood combo.

Before we can advise you further:

Model numbers of the range/hood?
Are there four wires in the existing 40A wiring or just three?

    Bookmark   December 21, 2012 at 4:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
llaatt22

Most appliance installation instructions involving electrical requirements and dimensions like separation between cooking surface and hood height are drawn from national codes and may be more stringent in local codes. In any case they are not "suggestions" from manufacturers.

    Bookmark   December 21, 2012 at 4:57PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ron Natalie

Sometimes they are "suggestions". If the instructions "recommend" a dedicated circuit, you can ignore it at your own peril. If it says it "requires" a dedicated circiut, you are bound to do it that way.

This is why I specifically asked for the model numbers. I can usually find the installation instructions on line to find out what they really say rather than relying on third hand information.

    Bookmark   December 21, 2012 at 5:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
llaatt22

Amen.

    Bookmark   December 22, 2012 at 5:04AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brandonr

The models are LDG3016ST and LMHM2017ST. The manuals are fairly explicit about the requirements:

Microwave: You need a 120V, 60Hz, AC only, 15A or 20A, fused electrical supply (located in the cabinet above the microwave as close as possible to the microwave circuit) serving only the microwave.

Range: 120 Volt, 60 Hertz, properly grounded dedicated circuit protected by a 15 or 20 Amp circuit breaker, or slow blow fuse.

If they do need separate circuits, is it acceptable to put a sub-breaker box in the attic which splits the old 40amp circuit into 2 separate circuits? Are there any other gotcha's I should be aware of?

    Bookmark   January 3, 2013 at 1:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

"If they do need separate circuits, is it acceptable to put a sub-breaker box in the attic which splits the old 40amp circuit into 2 separate circuits? Are there any other gotcha's I should be aware of?"

A sub-panel needs to meet all the access requirements.

30 inches wide, 36 inches deep, 6'+ height.

Think a volume as large as a refrigerator box.

    Bookmark   January 3, 2013 at 2:10PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Lights Flickering...
We paid an electrician to put in a ceiling light in...
regina_phalange
Insulation in electrical box
While in my attic the other day I saw an open electrical...
sgilliatt
ARGH! no boxes
Went over to my daughter's house to help them change...
Ron Natalie
Does a refrigerator need to be on a separate circuit?
Does a refrigerator need to be on a separate circuit?...
rontero
Doorbell goes off by itself.
Can anyone tell me why this would happen? It's a wired...
stu2900
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™