is this legal (code , nec), running so cord through sheetrock cei

murphysfNovember 17, 2012

Is this legal (code , NEC), running SO cord through sheetrock ceiling or wall?

See video at time 10:20 10 minutes 20 seconds?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CeattV3pC2Q

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tjdabomb

I don't see why not, the entire cord and vent will be inside of a metal chimney so it would be protected. I'd caulk the ceiling hole where the cord goes through but other than that, IMO this is fine.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 1:27PM
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dennisgli

It wasn't clear to me that the cord was going into the ceiling - I don't think there is anything that says that you can't run the cord through sheetrock. I just assumed that was some sort of valance and there was an exposed outlet above.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 1:51PM
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brickeyee

Cordage cannot be run through a wall into another room, and cord cannot be used in place of permanent approved wiring methods.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 5:10PM
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tjdabomb

Is that a NEC issue Brickey?

Would a simple solution be to install a duplex outlet on the ceiling inside the chimney?

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 7:44PM
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murphysf

I have a similar installation and have a receptacle in the attic which is on the other side of the sheetrock ceiling in the attic.

Is the attic considered another room?

I was thinking of running the cord through the sheetrock ceiling as show in the video adn plugging it into a duplex receptacle in the attic

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 8:30PM
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yosemitebill

While I certainly agree cordage can not be run through drywall, I did run into an interesting situation several years ago where a general contractor created a 12x12 framed opening, behind a flat panel television mounting area and a utility closet behind it for the equipment. The inspector had no problem with the AC cord running though it to an AC receptacle inside the closet. So where/when does the difference actually occur?

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 9:24PM
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randy427

ISTM that the requirement is for the entire length of the cordage to be freely accessible. If enclosed in the wall, it wouldn't be and would be considered an installed cable, an application for which it's not certified.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 9:14AM
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brickeyee

"Is that a NEC issue "

Yes.

Cordage is NOT allowed to go through walls, ceilings, floors, or substitute for permanent wiring.

Instal another receptacle.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 10:46AM
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dennisgli

Cordage is NOT allowed to go through walls, ceilings, floors, or substitute for permanent wiring.

But I don't think that was the question. The question was can it be run through sheetrock?

If the cord is accessible on both sides of the sheetrock - and doesn't extend through a ceiling or wall - what code does it violate?

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 5:26PM
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elltwo

It looks to me that this arrangement doesn't fit any definition of accessible in Art 100, and the online installation manual implies that you connect to a readily accessible outlet.

Also, he should have used a 6' step ladder.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 8:02AM
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brickeyee

Sheetrock is by definition a wall.

Trying to split hairs with an AHJ is NOT a productive exercise (why do id doubt this has even been sen by an inspector?).

Using cordage in place of permanent wiring is NOT ALLOWED.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 9:09AM
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dennisgli

Sheetrock is by definition a wall.

Car to quote the code that says this?

So if I put a piece of sheetrock between a dishwasher and an outlet under a sink - and plug the cord from the dishwasher into the outlet that's not up to code? Is it OK if it is a piece of plywood?

    Bookmark   November 22, 2012 at 8:35AM
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greg_2010

At some point, common-sense comes into play. Not everything can be defined down to the lowest possible interpretation. The NEC would have to be millions of pages long if that was the case.
Drywall is used on walls and ceilings. You don't use drywall in between cupboards, on the floor, to cover the rusted out patch on your car or in place of sod for that muddy patch on your lawn, etc.

If you want to do your installation this way, ask the AHJ if you can and accept his interpretation.

    Bookmark   November 22, 2012 at 3:10PM
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dennisgli

OK - I give - you don't use drywall to patch a muddy patch in the lawn so you wouldn't use it to build a valance in a kitchen over a range hood.

    Bookmark   November 22, 2012 at 4:56PM
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greg_2010

No, my examples were in response to this:
So if I put a piece of sheetrock between a dishwasher and an outlet under a sink
which is ridiculous.

The world is not black and white, but shades of gray. I don't think that this situation is either definitely provably allowable or definitely provably unallowable. I truly believe (and as evidenced by the small sample size of opinions here) that the majority of people (who know the rules) would be of the opinion that this isn't allowed. Therefore this situation is a dark shade of grey.

But the only person's opinion who matters is the AHJ.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 9:07AM
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greg_2010

Oh, and even if your ridiculous example of sheetrock between a dishwasher and an outlet under a sink was something that somebody would actually do, then it would still be fine because (I believe) that there is an explicit rule that says that you can pass a cord through to an adjacent cupboard for a dishwasher. And an explicit rule would trump a vague more all-encompassing rule if they contradict each other.

    Bookmark   November 23, 2012 at 9:16AM
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brickeyee

Now you know why the code gets bigger and bigger as folks seek ways around it.

Ask your AHJ.

They have the final say.

They are likely to allow it if you cut a large enough hole for the plug, just as most allow you to cut the wall of the cabinet.

The Op asked:
"Is this legal (code , NEC), running SO cord through sheetrock ceiling or wall?"

And the answer is NO.
You cannot run cordage to another room through "ceiling or wall."

This post was edited by brickeyee on Fri, Nov 30, 12 at 11:15

    Bookmark   November 30, 2012 at 11:13AM
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