Granite Backsplash - Outlet Issues

murphysfNovember 18, 2012

Hello

I just had new countertops and backsplashes installed in my kitchen.

I did not change or add any outlets or light switches

The granite fabricator / installer cut the rectangle holes for the outlets and switches in the granite.

I have two issues I wanted to see if there is an easy fix for before I contact the granite fabricator / installer.

1. On two of the cutouts the cutout is too low. When I screw in my light switch or ac receptacle the metal tabs or ears (not sure what they are called) keep pulling in past the granite as the granite was cut too low.

2. Similar but slightly opposite to #1 above. I cannot screw my switch plates down all the way as the screws bottom out into the granite. These are the tiny screws that hold the switch plate. I believe the fabricator / installer will have to come back out and made a very small half circle cutout in the center of the top and bottom to allow for the switch plate screws to screw in.

Any ideas of how I can solve either of these problems without bothering the fabricator / installer?

See attached photo

Thanks

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
kudzu9

As for the ears by the green arrow, that's not a problem. Just put in a wooden shim of the right thickness (with a small hole in the center) to make the space behind the ears flush with the granite. It looks like you have sheetrock behind that bottom hole, so that is not going to prevent the receptacle screw going all the way in once you have it shimmed properly. (If you have particularly long screws that are a problem, get yourself some short -- 1/4" -- ones at the hardware store.)

The hole by the red arrow is a different story. The GFI receptacle will need to be pulled out of the way so that a small hole can be drilled to allow for the top receptacle plate screw. You could do this with a diamond bit drill or a masonry bit, but it is tricky if you haven't done this before, and you could damage the granite or crack it. I would get the installer back to take care of this part of the fix if I were you.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 8:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ron Natalie

The granite guy will have no problem making those holes. I have diamond coring bits that I've cut similar holes, it's not going to be a problem. Do not use a regular masonary bit.

I sure hope that's a mud ring on that box there and not a utility box that you're almost certainly exceeding a box fill on.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 9:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ron Natalie

The granite guy will have no problem making those holes. I have diamond coring bits that I've cut similar holes, it's not going to be a problem. Do not use a regular masonary bit.

I sure hope that's a mud ring on that box there and not a utility box that you're almost certainly exceeding a box fill on.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 9:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tjdabomb

I have that same granite!!! :)

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 12:26PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

And from the pics you cannot tell how close the front if the box is the the granite surface.

It must be recessed no more than 1/8 inch.

    Bookmark   November 19, 2012 at 1:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
btharmy

I believe the maximum setback is 1/4" for non combustible materials. ('08 NEC, 314.20) The easy fix for holding the receptacle flush with the granite is spacers, ie: nuts, washers, loops of copper wire or purchase a commercially available product like the one in the link I attached. The offending bit of granite that prevents the cover screw from being installed can be quickly removed/notched with a high speed rotary tool and diamond or abrasive wheel.

Here is a link that might be useful: Try these for $6.

    Bookmark   November 20, 2012 at 4:46PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ron Natalie

Well it's actually 6mm :)

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 2:54AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jaysgarden

You could use some box extenders

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 10:57AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

There are even flat sheet metal pieces that can be used to reduce the opening size slightly when an extender is not needed, but the plaster ears fail to catch.

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 11:35AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

1/4 inch is correct of the box, I was thinking of the box to surface clearance on the sides and top.

    Bookmark   November 21, 2012 at 11:37AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Does a refrigerator need to be on a separate circuit?
Does a refrigerator need to be on a separate circuit?...
rontero
Well this sucks
Just when you thought the idiot popup ads in the gardenweb...
Ron Natalie
Replacing fan speed dial back to standard toggle?
I am removing a ceiling fan and replacing it with a...
onkyokoi
Need help Replacing old dimmer that used only 2 wires in a three way
I need advice as to which wire to connect to which...
txmat
Looking for Ideas For Lighting at base of 300' long driveway
Sorry for the "picture through the screen"...
dixieman
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™