So much for 'Tamper Resistant'

smithy123November 5, 2010

playing around with a small screwdriver and one of my portable cords, i got the single screwdriver into the receptacle in about 15 seconds. a child could easily do that. if it helps, it was a cooper resi grade, as well as a cooper weather resistant. both 5-15.

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inox

The explanations I have seen of tamper-resistant receptacles imply that they would not resist the entry of a small screwdriver into only one side of the receptacle. They are supposed to work by providing voltage only when something is inserted into both the hot and neutral sides of the receptacle, something a child is unlikely to accomplish.

Here is a link that might be useful: Tamper-Resistant Electrical Receptacles

    Bookmark   November 5, 2010 at 9:53PM
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pharkus

I just replaced a 1950s-era tamper-resistant receptacle.

It wasn't tamper-resistant when it was installed.

The caked-on rust and dirt made it very resistant to my attempts to tamper with it.

I ended up uninstalling it with a hammer.

    Bookmark   November 5, 2010 at 10:59PM
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petey_racer

"They are supposed to work by providing voltage only when something is inserted into both the hot and neutral sides of the receptacle,"

This is completely wrong. The voltage is always there. Here is the text right from the link your provided:

"These receptacles have spring-loaded shutters that close off the contact openings, or slots, of the receptacles. When a plug is inserted into the receptacle, both springs are compressed and the shutters then open, allowing for the metal prongs to make contact to create an electrical circuit. Because both springs must be compressed at the same time, the shutters do not open when a child attempts to insert an object into only one contact opening, and there is no contact with electricity."

    Bookmark   November 6, 2010 at 7:50AM
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smithy123

I used a single screwdriver. and nothing else. the receptacle was energized.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2010 at 8:13AM
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ontariojer

Tamper RESISTANT, not tamper(or idiot) proof.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2010 at 1:21PM
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smithy123

because i could get a small screwdriver in it, without inserting anything into the other slot, i render them pointless. If i can get a screwdriver into an energized receptacle, so can a child. in my kitchen, i have one where the shutter doesnt shut, either.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2010 at 5:37PM
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bus_driver

It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are too ingenious.

    Bookmark   November 6, 2010 at 7:14PM
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steve_fl

i got the single screwdriver into the receptacle in about 15 seconds. a child could easily do that.
This just goes to show that a child did do it---
Correct smithy?

    Bookmark   November 6, 2010 at 7:15PM
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smithy123

Yes. so they are useless.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2010 at 7:30AM
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bus_driver

But they cost more. Government really helps make housing more affordable.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2010 at 8:21AM
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DavidR

Government really helps make housing more affordable.

Blame NFPA, not the feds.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2010 at 10:47AM
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bus_driver

The NEC becomes law only when adopted by a legal jurisdiction. The NFPA is not such a jurisdiction.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2010 at 12:33PM
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DavidR

True, local lawmakers adopt the NEC, but my point is that the requirement was dreamed up the the NFPA board, not by our legislators (or yours in your jurisdiction).

    Bookmark   November 7, 2010 at 1:53PM
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smithy123

I'll just stick to my Hubbell 20A Industrial Grade.

    Bookmark   November 7, 2010 at 4:38PM
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