220V Electric Oven Outlet Installation

Mr.BeanNovember 30, 2013

Actually, it's a dual-fuel Wolf range. The specification says the outlet must lie within 3.25" of the floor. I don't see any way a recessed 220V, 30amp, outlet can lie that low unless I take out part of the 2x4" plate at the bottom of the wall, which is load bearing. I'm beginning to think the only way to do this is with a sideways, surface-mounted outlet. That's not something I've ever seen or done as a homeowner.

Can someone guide me here? If surface-mount is the right approach, then how should the wires come through the wall to the outlet?

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Ron Natalie

The manual for that range says SQUAT about receptacles. The wiring for the range has to emerge at the "kick plate" (below 3.5) level. Even if you wanted to put a receptacles there, you could surface mount it without cutting the bottom plate.

    Bookmark   November 30, 2013 at 10:27PM
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petey_racer

Surface mount it, horizontally, right at the floor.

Those over-priced high-end ranges are a huge PIA when it comes to logistics like this. You need to know EVERY detail ahead of time.

    Bookmark   December 1, 2013 at 7:57AM
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Mr.Bean

Surface mount at the floor it is then. Many thanks!

To be fair to them, they gain needed oven space by constraining the gas and electric. This is a dual-fuel range with convection oven, meaning they needed to make room for the convection fans as well. Their installation instructions are precise but could use some helpful guidelines.

    Bookmark   December 1, 2013 at 10:02AM
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Mr.Bean

Solution: (in case anyone else comes here looking for one)
I cut a rectangular hole as far down the wall as I could go (just touching the 2x4" horizontal wall plate) just to the side of where the wire feeds through, and big enough to fit in two 1x2" boards behind the drywall. I cut a rectangular 1x1" cutout in one of those boards on one side and near the center; the wire will feed through there. I glued the boards in place behind the drywall and waited until dry.

While waiting, I attached a black, keyhole-shaped surface-mount 220V, 30amp receptacle to the wire; red and black hots on either side, ground to green, white at remaining location. Tighten to 20 lbs. I used a wire clamp at the back hole of the receptacle.

I then cut a piece of drywall out to fit the hole and cut a rectangle near the bottom to fit over the wire mounting clamp. I glued this to the wood supports. When dry, I drilled holes for the receptacle back mounting screws, but used longer round-head screws to ensure it attached to the wood supports. In the end, the receptacle is secure to the wall, and can withstand plug insertion and removal (which was the goal of this whole tedious exercise).

    Bookmark   December 1, 2013 at 7:54PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Mr.Bean

Solution: (in case anyone else comes here looking for one)
I cut a rectangular hole as far down the wall as I could go (just touching the 2x4" horizontal wall plate) just to the side of where the wire feeds through, and big enough to fit in two 1x2" boards behind the drywall. I cut a rectangular 1x1" cutout in one of those boards on one side and near the center; the wire will feed through there. I glued the boards in place behind the drywall and waited until dry.

While waiting, I attached a black, keyhole-shaped surface-mount 220V, 30amp receptacle to the wire; red and black hots on either side, ground to green, white at remaining location. Tighten to 20 lbs. I used a wire clamp at the back hole of the receptacle.

I then cut a piece of drywall out to fit the hole and cut a rectangle near the bottom to fit over the wire mounting clamp. I glued this to the wood supports. When dry, I drilled holes for the receptacle back mounting screws, but used longer round-head screws to ensure it attached to the wood supports. In the end, the receptacle is secure to the wall, and can withstand plug insertion and removal (which was the goal of this whole tedious exercise). It looks great.

    Bookmark   December 1, 2013 at 7:55PM
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