240 50 cycle used in US, 60 cycle

pinkoOctober 2, 2011

I am looking for a cheap way to bring induction to a small cabin I use in rural Vermont. I am a frequent traveler to China and see fine looking induction units for a fraction of the US cost (I know the perils of no UL certification, but have a good guide in China to separate the wheat from the chaff.) But I haven't been able to ascertain, despite a fair amount of searching, what the affect of using the 50 cycle equipment in a 60 cycle environment. Most advice says if you have a motor to run, it is a no go. Electronics appear to be OK, what do I have with an induction cooktop?

Anybody care to weigh in?

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Ron Natalie

An induction cooktop shouldn't suffer any problems. I've got a neighbor using an import unit without problem.

    Bookmark   October 2, 2011 at 11:31PM
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bus_driver

Your state may be different, but in NC, the state law requires all electrical equipment sold or used in the state to be listed or labeled by a recognized testing laboratory. Not much way to enforce it unless they find such for sale on the shelves of a store.

    Bookmark   October 3, 2011 at 7:21AM
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brickeyee

"Most advice says if you have a motor to run, it is a no go."

They are simply wrong.

50 Hz motors work fine on 60 Hz, bit NOT the other way.

The motor will run slightly faster but operate fine.
The speed can be an issue for some loads on the motor (like pumps).

Induction heating hardware should be just fine.

    Bookmark   October 3, 2011 at 10:43AM
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ionized_gw

Have you shopped ebaY for bargains on cooktops? I have seen quite a few 60 Hz models manufactured for the US market. It is hard to believe that you can ship stuff over for less unless you are already bringing containers over for another reason.

    Bookmark   October 3, 2011 at 2:35PM
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Ron Natalie

There's only a cooling fan inside the induction top.
It's probably a universal (DC) motor anyhow.

My mother was gifted (by some Italians) one of the early Pastmatics before they were available in the US. It ran fine but tended to overheat and shutdown probably more than it should if it were on the right line frequency.

    Bookmark   October 3, 2011 at 4:53PM
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brickeyee

"There's only a cooling fan inside the induction top.
It's probably a universal (DC) motor anyhow.

It is far ore likely to be a shaded pole AC motor.

Universal motors tend to spin to fast on 120 VAC.

If any electronics are present that use DC power the motor may be any one of a number of permanent magnet stepper type motors.

    Bookmark   October 6, 2011 at 11:32AM
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