Need help

Reach2013September 5, 2013

This is my fuse box, the smaller pull is for the ac, stove and dryer. Right now it has 2 60 amp fuses in it. I was told this was causing the over heating of the main 100 amp fuses the top pull out. I was told to change them to 30 amp fuses. The reason I am asking is the main fuse was completely gone but was still making a connection so we didn't lose power the lights just started blinking. Went in and checked the fuses and the main pull was extremely hot. The fuse was all but gone the end fell off when we removed it, what could cause something like this? It is an older fuse box maybe 1971 or before Murray panel. ANY advice is appreciated.

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Ron Natalie

Who told you that? A fuse isn't going to regulate the current (until it blows completely). Fuseboxes shouldn't get hot, the fact that it fell out indicates it wasn't installed properly (which definitely can cause the heating).

    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 3:59PM
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bus_driver

Those Murray panels were not the highest quality. Two of the main causes of overheating are a failure to fully seat the pullout when putting it in place and the loosening of the wire terminals connecting to that main fuse block. After a serious overheating, the contact quality is seldom as good as original and additional problems can be expected. Smack the pullout with the heel of your hand to seat it. Tighten the wire terminals. If overheating continues, replace the panel.

Fuses can blow (melt the element) from overheating that is not related to a current overload.

This post was edited by bus_driver on Fri, Sep 6, 13 at 17:18

    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 9:09AM
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Reach2013

What would cause that to happen bus_driver?

Fuses can blow (melt the element) from overheating that is not related to a current overload.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2013 at 10:26AM
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randy427

If the fuse is not properly seated, arcing and sparking could occur which would create enough heat to desolder or melt the cartridge fuse element. You would also see other heat related damage to the fuse block which could cause it to need to be replaced.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2013 at 11:03AM
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Ron Natalie

Doesn't even need to arc, just a poorly made connection can cause significant heat especially on these high current fuses. There's good reason we require connections to be made in boxes.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2013 at 2:20PM
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