Making a 220v recep fed from (2) 110v outlet adapter

wildbill2374August 19, 2011

I have a 220v portable welder. The problem I have is that not every place I take it has an appropriate receptacle to plug it in to. I have an idea to make and adapter for this. I would use a junction box with the appropriate 220 receptacle and have 2 short whips feeding it, each with a 110 male plug on the ends. If I were to run a heavy gauge extension cord from each whip to different 110v outlets (each of which was fed by one of the 2 different legs in the circuit panel)Then I would have 220v at the adapter, right? Breakers in the odd number column of the panel are on one leg and even numbered breakers are on the other leg. So if "Living Rm" is breaker "12" and "Laundry" is breaker "9", then running one of the extension cords to each of these rooms should work. Am I looking at this correctly? Is there any reason not to do this?

My next question is amperage. If the above can be done, how is the amperage figured? If each of the (2) 110v circuits are 15a, does that give a 30a rating after the 2 legs are combined through the 220v receptacle, or does it remain 15a? Thanks for any input.

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brickeyee

"If each of the (2) 110v circuits are 15a, does that give a 30a rating after the 2 legs are combined through the 220v receptacle, or does it remain 15a?"

It remains 15 A at 240 V.

Unless you have a small welder, not a great idea since it will overload the 15 A circuits (and probably trip them off as soon as you try to strike an arc).

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 5:40PM
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fixizin

They make welders that run on standard 120V. Sorry, you probably didn't want to hear that.

I used to sketch out jury-rigs such as yours... luckily someone wiser was always around to say "put down the pencil, back away slowly..."... lol.

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 6:18PM
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wildbill2374

The welder is in excess of the 15a that the standard 110 circuit would provide. I know of the 110v portable mig welders, but the higher voltage ones can weld heavier thicknesses of metal. If the (2) 110v legs combined only offer the amps rated to a single leg, then I guess the Idea is dead in the water....Hypothetically speaking though, does the rest of the idea hold water? Is there any other reason that you can't link the two 110v outlets (fed by the (2) separate legs in a circuit panel) to make a 220v portable outlet?

    Bookmark   August 19, 2011 at 11:07PM
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mike_kaiser_gw

It's a bad idea. Buy a 120v welder or a gas powered welder and long cables.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2011 at 8:26AM
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brickeyee

"I used to sketch out jury-rigs such as yours... luckily someone wiser was always around to say "put down the pencil, back away slowly..."... lol."

It can actually work if you only need 15 A at 240 V.

When doing refrigeration work there is often not easily available 120 V to run a vacuum pump (or recovery equipment) since the requirement for a 120 V receptacle near a compressor/condenser is relatively new.

Running from one leg to ground at the outside disconnect is pretty common.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2011 at 10:41AM
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groundrod

all of the conductors of a circuit must be contained in the same conduit or cable etc...

    Bookmark   August 20, 2011 at 10:52AM
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wayne440

A good way to get someone killed. When the welder is "on", removing one of the 120V plugs may yield a nice suicide cord, the plug blades will be hot.

I solved part of a similar problem by making adapter pigtails with common 240V range/dryer/AC plugs and a welder receptacle. Still probably not 100% "to code", but not nearly as dangerous as a pair of 120V plugs.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2011 at 11:39AM
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brickeyee

"all of the conductors of a circuit must be contained in the same conduit or cable etc..."

That does not say anything about utilization equipment that is cord and plug connected.

There are numerous ways to rig a device like this that prevent exposure to a male plug with any voltage present.

    Bookmark   August 20, 2011 at 2:43PM
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enigma_2

Why not consider purchasing a 120v-240v transformer? A 5000 watt unit will run around $150 and you could use it on any job site. One example is on link below.

Here is a link that might be useful: 5000 Watts Step Up - Step Down Transformer

    Bookmark   August 29, 2011 at 5:19PM
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