Lutron receptacle?s

footwedgeJuly 23, 2011

I was installing the new lutron receptacles for the small appliance circuit. The original installation consisted of a 20 amp gfi followed by 3-15 amp receptacles protected by a 20 amp breaker. I did not notice the existing gfi receptacle was 20 amps until now. The existing cable is 12-2.

I ordered a lutron 15 amp gftr receptacle and 3-15 amp receptacles to replace the existing. I found this discrepancy while I was trying to connect the ground wire to the 15 amp gftr. I tried numerous times and the ground screw will not back out enough to allow the #12 to get behind. I tried a scrap piece of #14 and it fit.

My questions are:

1. Should I have ordered all 20 amp receptacles for the small appliance circuit?

2. or will it be ok to install just like the original- 20 amp gfi followed by 3 15 amp receptacles?

3. will a 20 amp gftr allow more space to connect the #12 ground? I'm thinking it will be the same as a 15 amp gftr but not sure.

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
footwedge

and found that it is acceptable to put a 15 amp receptacle on a 20 amp non dedicated circuit. I also checked several existing duplex receptacles on other 20 amp circuits and they are all 15 amps.

So now my question is, should I change the gftr to a 20 amp leaving the others at 15 amps or continue to try to connect the ground (#12) to the 15 amp gftr?

Lutron tech support recommended 20 amp duplex receptacles if protected by a 20 amp breaker. They also said the ground screw on the 20 amp gftr will back out more allowing connection of the #12. They must very tight specs on the construction of the 15 and 20 amp gftrs.

    Bookmark   July 23, 2011 at 2:55PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

"Lutron tech support recommended 20 amp duplex receptacles if protected by a 20 amp breaker. "

Simply wrong.

You will probably not have any 5-20P plugs.
Use 5-15R or 5-20R receptacles.
The NEC allows use of 15 amp devices on 20 amp circuits as long as there is more than 1 receptacle (and a duplex is of course two).

Here is a link that might be useful: NEMA Plug & Recep configurations

    Bookmark   July 23, 2011 at 5:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
footwedge

ThanksBrickeyee,

What are your thoughts on the 20 amp ground screw backing out more than the 15 amp one so it can accept the #12?

I guess this could be possible.

    Bookmark   July 23, 2011 at 7:00PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
footwedge

#12 on the ground. Finished wiring the remaining receptacles with all passing the tester. Making Progress.

    Bookmark   July 24, 2011 at 9:23PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Billl

"What are your thoughts on the 20 amp ground screw backing out more than the 15 amp one so it can accept the #12? "

Sounds like something an outsourced customer service department would say. The 15A GFCI is designed to be used on a 20a circuit. It is more common for it to be used there then on a 15A circuit now since the locations that require GFCI mostly require 20a circuits - kitchens and baths. It most certainly will work with 12 gauge wire.

If you can't get the screw to back out further, that is more to do with forearm strength than design. Unless the receptacle is damaged, the wire will fit.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2011 at 8:41AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
normel

The Lutron GFCIs have a plate under the ground screw you just slip the ground wire under then tighten down... no need to wrap around the screw.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2011 at 9:05AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

"What are your thoughts on the 20 amp ground screw backing out more than the 15 amp one so it can accept the #12? "

BS. 15 amp duplex receptacles are rated for use on 20 amp circuits with #12 wire.

    Bookmark   July 31, 2011 at 9:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
footwedge

BS. 15 amp duplex receptacles are rated for use on 20 amp circuits with #12 wire.

That's what I thought.

    Bookmark   July 31, 2011 at 12:57PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

You do need to be aware that working #12 is slightly more difficult than #14.

A receptacle with 5 #12 conductors (2 hots, 2 neutral, 1 ground) takes a decent amount of force to fold the wiring back into the box.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2011 at 9:15AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Goodbye Phone Jack: what to do with wires?
We want to remove this phone jack. It's in a useless...
maggiepatty
1 of 2 security light bulbs keep going out, do i need a new light?
I have a security light fixture in my carport that...
tlbean2004
Please Critique Low-Volt (Home Automation) Plan/Proposal
GW/Houzz Community, As always, I want to thank this...
Andrew K.
Wireless light switch for switched outlet?
So we have no overhead lighting in any of our bedrooms,...
vikingshelmut
Can I electrify battery-operated lights?
Hi all. Is there a way to electrify a battery operated...
eam44
Sponsored Products
DW 3528 Single Row LED Strip Light 240/m 10mm wide Foot
EnvironmentalLights.com
32 Spun Metal Lid
Fifthroom.com
Green 3528 Quad Row LED Strip Light 450/m 28mm wide Foot
EnvironmentalLights.com
Witt Industries Single Opening 33 Gallon Green Recycling Bin - 18RTGN-1H
$303.99 | Hayneedle
SW 3528 Single Row LED Strip Light 240/m 10mm wide 5m Reel
EnvironmentalLights.com
Lightray Brushed Aluminum 6.5-Inch High LED Wall Sconce
$114.00 | Bellacor
Witt Industries Stadium Round Opening 20 Gallon Blue Recycling Bin - SC20-01-RC-
$372.99 | Hayneedle
Nebula White 25-Inch Wide LED Flush Mount
Bellacor
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™