How to make evry room phone jack receiving the DSL signal?

coodyJune 2, 2013

My house every room has phone jack. If one room is connected to the phone service, all other rooms phone jacks can receive the phone signal. Now I installed the ATT DSL in one room but other rooms phone jacks cannot receive the DSL signal by connecting the Modem. I do not know why. Can you explain it? Is it possible to make every room phone jack receiving the DSL signal by connecting the modem? I can move the modem to any room.

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Ron Natalie

The DSL signal makes your regular phones sound like crap. So there's these things called FILTERS that block the DSL from where you've got phones plugged in. In the case of my new house, the filter isn at the Network Interface (DMARK). If you like you can remove all the filters from your house wiring and install them at each telephone set and you'll have DSL available everywhere.

    Bookmark   June 2, 2013 at 5:30PM
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Ron Natalie

Of course, the next question is WHY? Are you planning to move your DSL/modem router around? The phone company end of the thing will support only one DSL modem active at a time.

    Bookmark   June 2, 2013 at 5:31PM
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coody

My house has no phone but DSL service only. So the filter probably is unnecessary. I have a filter and modem to connect the phone jack. Why can only one room phone jack receive the DSL signal but the other room phone jacks canâÂÂt? Does anyone know how to make all room phone jacks is able to receive the DSL signal by connecting the modem and filter? I want to move my modem and filter to the different room to receive the DSL.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2013 at 10:15AM
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brickeyee

If you do not have any voice service, just move the modem around.

Your data rate might be very slow depending on the age (style actually) of the actual wiring.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2013 at 10:28AM
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Ron Natalie

If the filter isn't in place, most likely your incoming subscriber lines isn't connected to those jacks. You'll have to trace it out. A good place to look is somewhere near the network interface.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2013 at 11:53AM
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geoffrey_b

Get something like this:

Linksysî WRT54GL Cable/DSL Router 802.11G with Switch

Then your entire home will be connected wirelessly.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2013 at 2:46PM
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btharmy

You should be able to plug your modem into any phone jack in the house you want to. The filters are only used if you still use voice service as well.

    Bookmark   June 3, 2013 at 10:33PM
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llaatt22

One possibility is your system is on a POTS splitter to isolate your DSL jack from the other phone jacks. This improves internet speed. It is as if all other phone jacks have DSL filters on them.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2013 at 7:56AM
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bus_driver

My house has Cat 6e cable. I installed the cable and the jacks. As far as I know, there is no filter. If there is one, it is in the demarc box outside. The phone company technician put voice on one of the wire pairs and the DSL on another. So I have both available.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2013 at 9:16AM
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Ron Natalie

If you don't have a filter/splitter you'd here it. DSL makes a hell of a racket in the voice lines without it. The demarks that they put on my house have the splitter/filter built in. There's one terminal that's ORANGE for the DSL modem and three that are BLUE for the regular voice connections (I might have those colors backwards).

    Bookmark   June 6, 2013 at 11:05AM
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saltcedar

Might be wrong but since he doesn't have a dial tone he won't
know which pairs are connected at the demark. Most likely just
moving or connecting the correct pair will allow the DSL to work
in every room.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2013 at 11:48AM
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yosemitebill

Coody, I think you are confusing your home telephone wiring with data network wiring - referred to as a LAN (local area network).

Your home has POTS (plain old telephone service) wired throughout and uses RJ11 connectors for the telephones.

Your modem plugs into one of those RJ11 connectors and strips off and modulates/demodulates (mo/dem) the high frequency network signal riding above the voice.

It then outputs that data as a standard Ethernet communication signal over the RJ45 connectors used on wired computer connections.

If you wish to have an Ethernet connection available in each room, you need to run CAT5e/CAT6 cable to each room from a "router or switch" connected to the to the output of the modem.

Of course you can also use a wireless Wi-Fi setup, but a wired connection provides better speeds and greater security due to the lack of need for encryption and interference from other 2.4 GHz RF sources.

    Bookmark   June 6, 2013 at 10:18PM
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jreagan_gw

Coody may have CAT5e/CAT6 wiring in the house but still wired as RJ11 style connections. Could the installer have put the DSL on line2 and used a different pair on the CAT5e cable just for the jack with the DSL modem?

In my house, each room has two CAT5e cables and two RG6 cables behind a single outlet cover. One CAT5e is for phone, the other for wired Ethernet. I have a switch downstairs for the Ethernet and a 66block for the phone.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2013 at 8:11AM
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Ron Natalie

I have cat5 wiring going to RJ11s.

He may not have dial tone, but I'm sure he'll have battery so a lot of the telephone line testers will work. However, I would be surprised if he doesn't have a dial tone as well. Even though he doesn't USE the voice service, I've found very few phone companies that can set up a DSL without having a phone number attached to it as well.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2013 at 8:57AM
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weedmeister

It is possible he has a 'dry loop'. That is, no battery and no dial tone. Just DSL.

Don't use the filter AT ALL. It is not necessary for the DSL modem. It is only used for a voice phone.

Some phone jack plates have the filter in place behind the plate. You have to look. If the filter is in place, that would explain why the modem does not work.

BTW: you can only use one modem at a time in one location at a time.

    Bookmark   June 10, 2013 at 11:00PM
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Ron Natalie

Dry loop only refers to the fact that you don't have to buy voice service. I suspect he still has battery.

    Bookmark   June 11, 2013 at 7:03AM
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kurto

Dry loop means no battery. Wet loop means battery. Having said that, if he only has DSL service on a pair, it could go either way, depending on the telco.

    Bookmark   June 16, 2013 at 12:26AM
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Ron Natalie

Sorry KURTO, but you're wrong. Back historically, dry paris meant not connected to any phone company equipment (no battery, nothing). Just metallic continuity.

However, the term is coopted in the regulatory framework for DSL. "Dry Pair" in that context means you don't have to PURCHASE voice service to get the DSL service. You may quite well find that your dry pair has battery, a telephone number, and perhaps even dial tone associated with it.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2013 at 8:27AM
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kurto

Ron, perhaps where you live the telco doesn't follow any sort of standard nomenclature. I work for a tier one telco in the broadband area. I can assure you that we still follow the historical definition of "dry loop" meaning not connected to any battery. It hasn't lost its meaning just because DSL came along and doesn't play by all of the rules. We have many dry loops other than those associated with DSL service.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2013 at 10:23AM
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Ron Natalie

It's not my TELCO, it's the REGULATORY description fo the service. WHether your carrier treats the term in the literal sense, let me assure you in the matter that makes ANY difference to what the customer can ask for or expect, all a DRY LOOP means is they don't have to buy VOICE service to get data service. It means nothing else.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2013 at 3:01PM
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brickeyee

"it's the REGULATORY description fo the service."

Post the regulation.

DSL is the ultimate proof that FDM (Frequency Division Multiplexing) will NEVER DIE.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2013 at 6:28PM
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weedmeister

By definition, a dry loop has no dial tone nor battery. It is a 'raw' copper pair.

HOWEVER, many of the telco's don't do it this way any more, especially as far as DSL is concerned. They charge more for a dry loop implementation. Hence, they may TARIFF DSL 'dry-loop' service as something with battery and perhaps even dial tone, but it's not a dry loop after that.

And assigning the line a number is not a surprise either. Where I used to work, it was standard to assign a number to a DSL dry loop. But it was a number you could not dial (1nn-xxxx). It was simply a place holder for the billing system.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2013 at 7:37PM
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yosemitebill

In the 1960's and 1970's "dry loops" were also known as "lease-lines" and were used for intercommunication between separate structures - intercom, telecom, alarm, control circuits, etc.

Terms, and acronyms, can often have very different meanings and interpretations depending on the field in which you are involved. I think we are just seeing these differences discussed here.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2013 at 11:33PM
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