Please recommend a pull saw for my Christmas list

la_koalaNovember 17, 2012

My family's started asking me what I want for Christmas. :-)

One thing that I think I'd like this year is a Japanese (?) pull saw. While I don't know much about them, I know (a) I see them mentioned here on the forum and (b) I don't have one.

Any brand recommendations from you all?

Amazon shows a bunch of different brands (Irwin, Tajima, Shark), and I don't know whether price is an indication of quality.

Thanks!

Lee

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sombreuil_mongrel

Here is a link to my personal favorite. Very fine kerf, crosscuts _and_ rips equally well. Replacement blades are only 19 bucks. Saw is 45.
Casey

Here is a link that might be useful: Japanese Dovetail saw

    Bookmark   November 17, 2012 at 11:36AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bobismyuncle

I have three different sizes of Shark's saws. Happy with all of them. Which one(s) you want will depend upon what you want to do with them.

I also have a very nice saw that I got at Lee Valley, but I've seen the same thing elsewhere

Here is a link that might be useful: lee valley's saws

    Bookmark   November 17, 2012 at 1:20PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
la_koala

Hi Casey and bobsmyuncle, *thanks* for the recommendations! The price range is good, and I like the idea of replacement blades.

Which one(s) you want will depend upon what you want to do with them.

Aye, that's so true, isn't it? :-)

While I don't have a specific project in mind, I recall reading an article in This Old House some time this year where they were fitting wainscoting or something against an existing window stool and apron, and mentioned using a "Japanese pull saw". For the life of me, I cannot find that article now in my TOH issues on my shelf. What I do remember is thinking "wow, that would be handy to have".

And another advantage for me is that I find that I have more muscle power in the "pull" motion than the push motion. I'm a girl, oops, I mean woman. :-) For some reason, I can pull more easily than push.

Thanks again for this!

--Lee

    Bookmark   November 17, 2012 at 7:32PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HandyMac

Just be aware that pull saws are much different than push saws.

Other than the obvious change of motion, that is.

Pull saws have blades much more flexible than push saws. The actual sawing is done more in a rhythm than for speed. That means the complete cut takes longer.

I read an article about why the Japanese prefer pull to push action. They feel the acts of creation are as important, if not more so, than the creation itself. Pulling the saw brings the act inward to the soul and invests more personal effort into making something.

I sometimes get frustrated when using a pull dovetail saw because the blade is more supple than the stronger push design blades. It helps to remember the spirituality of the reason for the design.

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 12:45PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
la_koala

Hi handymac,

Wow, thanks for sharing that aspect about the article of why the Japanese prefer pull to push action. Really, truly thanks for that!

For me personally, I cannot tell you what a huge help that is. Because in the last few years, I have been consciously trying to grow more spiritually, and now that you've given me that thought to keep in mind as I use these types of saws, I think it will help me have more success to achieve whatever goal is there in the moment :-)

Thank you so much for sharing that! While I'm sure that I'm inadequately expressing myself here, because before I never connected spirituality with tools, your comments make me think about it in a new way, and I like that.

--Lee

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 2:19PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sombreuil_mongrel

Pull saws can be made thinner because the blade is in tension when used, so the blade needn't be made thick enough to resist the bending force that is brought against the push-cut saws. The thinner kerf is removing less material, therefore the effort is less. Pull saws are therefore the more efficient cutting tools because they obtain the same results with less energy expense.
Casey

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 2:24PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bobismyuncle

Agree with Casey.

I can trim off 1/16" off the end of a board with one of these. Can't do that with a western saw (well, at least _I_ can't)

If I was only to get one, I'd go for the middle one I posted. I've marked "X" (crosscut) and "R" (rip) on the appropriate edges.

Be aware the teeth are usually impulsed hardened. That means you can't resharpen them. It also means hitting something hard might chip a tooth or two off.

You can spend really big bucks on these things. See link. I'd suggest going with a less expensive one and see how you like it.

Here is a link that might be useful: What, not $299?

    Bookmark   November 18, 2012 at 6:20PM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Brand new dewalt planer, not feeding?
Hopefully it's just me doing something wrong. It's...
fireweed22
Installing new deck door
I've ordered and received a new custom pre-hung deck...
africanboy
Routers
I am thinking of getting a router, never owned one....
hogan_nj
Planing weathered/near rotted lumber?
I was just curious if it's OK to run some old, very...
fireweed22
How to tell treated vs. untreated wood?
Can anyone tell me if there's a way to distinguish...
unkyaku
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™