How Do I Fix This

mike_kaiser_gwJune 8, 2012

We have a lighted medicine cabinet with three little low-voltage halogen lamps that looks a lot like this one:

The lights are switched by one of those combo switch/GFCI receptacle devices that's on the wall next to the cabinet. She's always complained that with a single receptacle that she plugging and unplugging to use her haircare appliances. So I figure I'll put in a bigger box and add another receptacle.

The transformer sits above the lights and the "cord" goes into the wall and enters the box with the receptacle, not through a knock out but through the mounting holes in the side of the box.

At this point I'm suspecting that this thing was never meant to be hardwired and the original installer just cut the plug off the cord and ran into the box. Although a length of lamp cord running down the wall to the receptacle seems a bit odd, not to mention ugly.

The only "proper" fix that comes to mind is to put a switched receptacle directly above the cabinet. That wouldn't look so great either.

Any suggestions?

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randy427

Does the transformet appear to be designed be able to have a different power cable, like NM, installed?
You also might try using a 'clock receptacle' above the cabinet. It has a single outlet which is recessed a half inch or so from the wall surface. If the box is mounted horizontally close to the top of the cabinet, it should minimize its visibility.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2012 at 3:15PM
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mike_kaiser_gw

No, the transformer has [lamp] cord coming out of it.

Who designs this stuff?

    Bookmark   June 10, 2012 at 9:45AM
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brickeyee

"the "cord" goes into the wall and enters the box with the receptacle, not through a knock out but through the mounting holes in the side of the box.

"the transformer has [lamp] cord coming out of it."

Is their a plug on the end?
'zip cord' is not rated for use in concealed locations, and inside the wall is concealed.

    Bookmark   June 10, 2012 at 11:00AM
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mike_kaiser_gw

Yes, I know zip cord isn't approved for concealed locations. No plug on the end. I suspect the original installer just cut off the plug and connected the cord directly to the switch.

I'd really prefer not to put a receptacle above the cabinet and was hoping for other ideas. Although I'm not sure one exists.

It's beyond me why they would design something like this (beyond the obvious, "make it as cheaply as possible).

    Bookmark   June 10, 2012 at 11:16AM
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w0lley32

If he mounted the cabinet in such a way that you don't need any tools to take it out (such as with a screw through a keyhole slot), would he be allowed to put the clock receptacle behind the cabinet, providing that the wire is passed through a hole big enough and protected with a rubber grommet? If allowed, he would just have to buy a plug that's 90 degrees offset, so it would not protrude from the wall and touch the back of the cabinet.

Here is a link that might be useful: 90 degree plug

    Bookmark   June 11, 2012 at 7:36PM
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brickeyee

Put a receptacle in the cabinets or a clock type receptacle behind the light.

    Bookmark   June 12, 2012 at 10:14AM
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