Fixing Woodwork

snookums2November 24, 2011

I've got a door jam with gouges along it from pulling off the casing piece. The edge of the casing is a bit jagged or irregular where it fits to the jam. Can this be filled/fixed after the casing has been put back on because that's already been done. The gouges go under the casing piece.

There are also some chips to the edge of some the casing. Can these types of chips be successfully filled?

Side view:

Chips on edge of casing:

Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mike_kaiser_gw

You could use something like Minwax's High Performance Wood Filler to make the repairs. Basically you'd fill the area and the sand it to match the existing contours.

The gap between the casing and jamb can be filled with painter's caulk and then painted.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2011 at 7:13AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

Another vote for the Minwax High Performance Wood Filler

I have used it to restore doors with holes from dead bolts (yes, on interior doors), to repair the case molding that was cut for the surface mounted strike, and on window muntins damaged by the lock on double hung windows (lock on the lower sash moved to the locked position as the window was opened because the flat spring designed to hold it had broken).

If you catch it when it is mostly set but not hardened completely you can use sharp chisels to shave away most of the excess, then after it hardens completely use sandpaper to make it level and smooth.

Under a coat of paint you cannot tell tere was ever any damage.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2011 at 10:35AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
snookums2

Good to know it can be fixed securely. I was concerned those edge chips on the casing wouldn't be strong and would just chip off again. Maybe that's with regular fill.

I would think it would have been easier with better results to have leveled and fixed the jam damage before putting the casing back on. Before or after is just fine? Looks very sloppy way of doing things to me.

I'm not sure why they took it off to begin with. The guy who did it years ago had done a really nice job. Very frustrating to see things get beat up.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2011 at 11:47AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

:I would think it would have been easier with better results to have leveled and fixed the jam damage before putting the casing back on. Before or after is just fine? Looks very sloppy way of doing things to me. "

A lot depends on what you have more of, money or time.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2011 at 1:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
snookums2

It would seem easier to have done it when the pieces were separate because all is easy to reach to smooth out and work with. It still needs to be done. They waste so darn much time that there's plenty of that around to be better spent on doing a good job. They are also being paid by the hour. If I'm paying a lot for something I expect it to be well done. Maybe it will look fine and hold up over time. I don't know. Their drywall work is done in that room and is also lumpy. It looks pretty bad when the light hits it. I guess if there's a choice, spend a little more time making it look good or save money, the choice is mine. My money, my house.

    Bookmark   November 24, 2011 at 9:30PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

You could have payed for new materials.

    Bookmark   November 25, 2011 at 5:59PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
karinl

Check the thread linked below for some good instructions on how to remove casings without gouging them like this.

If your casings are now installed with nails, what I would do is use Brickeyee's method for removing them again, do the repairs on jambs and casings, and then re-install them to your satisfaction.

Filling between jamb and casing is an option if the gaps bother you, but has to be scraped off and redone any time the casings are removed.

Karin L

Here is a link that might be useful: How not to damage jambs and casings

    Bookmark   November 27, 2011 at 12:00PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
snookums2

Thanks. That's true, should have just been replaced. I'm guessing it was glued on originally. There are no set nails now so it seems to have been glued back on.

They make things so much more difficult than need be.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 2:33AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
brickeyee

"That's true, should have just been replaced. I'm guessing it was glued on originally. "

That could easily increase the force needed to remove the molding resulting in damage (and even splitting of the molding if they used a strong glue).

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 10:46AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
snookums2

That's what I thought. It looks to have been glued on so probably resulted in that type of damage. I wasn't thinking they were careless taking it off. It does look to me like the damage should have been addressed before re-gluing it in order to work efficiently overall and get good end results that will hold up over time. I do know that they were rushing that day.

Now they're rushing again. Applying casing over walls that still need drywall repair (patching holes from jam removal). The holes go underneath the casing. I don't see how that will be easy to accomplish or do a neat job with the trim being in the way now.

Why waste the money on a bad repair or one I'll have to go back in and do it myself anyway. That's not why they're here.

When they're done and it doesn't look so good, they get to get paid again doing it all over. They're by the hour and frequently manage to need to do things multiple times.

I am not in charge, obviously, but am the one here to see what goes on and common sense tells me this is not efficient or will it give good results. But I am not a construction worker.

    Bookmark   December 4, 2011 at 11:42AM
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Gel stain on stair treads and handrail?
I have read many of the inspirational posts in the...
amt782
Wood surface with bad smell
I purchased used entertainment shelf from Kijiji and...
markintosh
golf t horse racing game templete
could someone email me the template for a horse racing...
ziggymaster
Differences in Wood Stains?
I went to purchase some stain to refinish a stripped...
jellytoast
making templates from graph paper
I seen some of the woodworking plans on the Internet...
hoganjr
People viewed this after searching for:
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™