toggling switch between different 220 appliances?

homegroJune 8, 2011

I was looking for a switch that can be switched between two 220 appliances, namely a range and a dryer. namely, only one of the appliance can be on at one time, but not both concurrently. Ideally it should be able to turn the whole thing off, but it is not a simple on-off switch. I had tried a few specialized electrical parts stores, but no luck. Anyone has any thoughts or experiences with what I am talking about? Thanks.

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brickeyee

Double Pole, Double Throw (DPDT) center off.

Make sure is has enough voltage and current (inductive motors are hard on switches).

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 9:12AM
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homegro

Thank you so much. It seems natural to have a need (justification) for this kind of switches, but I had a hack of times explaining why I need such a switch, even to specialized electrical parts stores. Thank you again.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 9:46AM
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homegro

Hi brickeye, you are very good in reminding me of paying attention to "voltage and current". I Google DPDT, and found many for sale on-line,but I have yet to find one that is rated for 220 volts and 40 amps. If I found one, the price would be very high, based on the prices of the lower rated DPDT. I wonder how difficult or clumsy it is to construct one by hand, does Radio Shack or other like kind stores sell kits or mechanical parts for this purpose? Thanks.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 12:03PM
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doug_gb

I don't intend to sound critical - Brickeye gave you the answer. You said "If I found one, the price would be very high." Well yeah it's gonna be high - that's a lot of current and it's DPDT. IMO you know nothing about electricity - and this job is too big for you to handle.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 1:25PM
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ionized_gw

The cost is high because the materials required to make a switch like that are much higher than for what is likely your reference switch. In addition, many fewer are produced than for what is your likely reference switch.

The counter staff at the supply stores might get dumbfounded because, despite your assumption, this is not a conventional way to power a range and a dryer. They are not electrician/installer either. If you go in and ask for a transfer switch, they will be able to help you. An electrician could help you too, but would likely to be puzzled about your motives without more information than we have at this point.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 1:58PM
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ionized_gw

The cost is high because the materials required to make a switch like that are much higher than for what is likely your reference switch. In addition, many fewer are produced than for what is your likely reference switch.

The counter staff at the supply stores might get dumbfounded because, despite your assumption, this is not a conventional way to power a range and a dryer. They are not electrician/installer either. If you go in and ask for a transfer switch, they will be able to help you. An electrician could help you too, but would likely to be puzzled about your motives without more information than we have at this point.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 2:00PM
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homegro

No one has answered my real question yet. The logic behind the DPDT is simple (contrary to doug gb seemed to want us to believe!)that a hardwired switch functioning as DPDT can be constructed safely (a bit blumbsy, I admit). Is there a code violation concerns on doing this?

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 3:59PM
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randy427

No code violation as long as:
1. The cable is the proper size for the breaker. (Make sure the breaker is the correct size for both appliances)
2. The switch is UL certified and in the correct enclosure (You won't find parts at Radio Shack to make a switch of this capacity and the enclosure won't be found at Home Depot, etal)
3. Other aspects of the installation are correct (grounding, etc)

Alternatively,
You could use a contactor relay to control each appliance and a 15 amp SPDT switch to control the relays. You would not then need 40 amp cables to your switch.
OR
There are contactors that connect to Load A when the control relay is energized and Load B when not. I've used these for much smaller loads, but you you could talk to an electrical supply house or call a manufacturer (Seimans, Allen-Bradley, Cutler Hammer, etc) to see if they have anything that fits your need.

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 5:07PM
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saltcedar

Outdoor Double Pole Double Throw 100 Amp

Here is a link that might be useful: GE Safety Switch TC10323R

    Bookmark   June 8, 2011 at 7:21PM
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homegro

Thank you Randy, that was very helpful. At this point, I am more incline to try the first approach, I will poke around. Thank you again.

    Bookmark   June 9, 2011 at 7:25AM
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live_wire_oak

It'd be much easier to just install the 2nd dedicated line for the appliance in question instead of trying to find some hinky way to share a single circuit by two appliances that really need their own circuit.

    Bookmark   June 9, 2011 at 2:10PM
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