Seeking pruning blade advice

jallySeptember 6, 2011

Anyone here with alot of experience on reciprocating saw pruning blades? I see various products touted, such as T-Rex Extreme, and also Milwaukee & Skil.

I'd appreciate answers to these questions:

(1) Is 12" best or is 9" best for pruning thick limbs & saplings which I want to clear from property?

(2) Do you most recommend T-Rex Extreme, or Milwaukee or Skil or other?

Thanks!

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mike_kaiser_gw

Can't say I've used a pruning blade in a reciprocating saw. As for saw brand, I'd go with Milwaukee; there's a reason that many folks call any reciprocating saw a "Sawzall". Skil is Bosch's entry level (DIY, homeowner) line. Never head of T-Rex.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2011 at 6:51AM
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sombreuil_mongrel

Get the one with the most touted non-stick coating. The sap is your enemy. If one of the choices has teflon coating, I'd buy that one.
Casey

    Bookmark   September 7, 2011 at 11:20AM
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jally

Thanks for the input.
Also, are the below blades long enough at 9 inches?

Skil pruning blade

Milwaukee pruning blade - anything better on this than on the Skil above?

also here's:
T-Rex Extreme Video's - does this seem best to you?

    Bookmark   September 7, 2011 at 3:19PM
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jally

P.S. I made an error above.
Here's the one I meant to post:

Skil pruning blade

    Bookmark   September 7, 2011 at 3:24PM
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brickeyee

Since the saw stroke is way less than the blade length the length sets how large a limb you cat cut, and not much else,

just be sure to cut through the bark on the underside closer to the trunk before moving to the top of the limb to prevent bark stripping.

    Bookmark   September 7, 2011 at 6:32PM
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jally

So that means that 9" is long enough?

what's your opinion of the T-Rex extreme?

    Bookmark   September 8, 2011 at 5:29PM
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brickeyee

How big a limb do you want to cut?

I use the Sawzall brand.

    Bookmark   September 8, 2011 at 7:01PM
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jally

OK, finally, thanks - by now i'm 3/4 decided on 9" Milwaukee, since that's 2 votes for Milwaukee (which i suppose is synonymous with Sawzall), and I don't see myself tackling anything close to 9" diameter limbs.

My remaining indecision is due to lack of reviews comparing 9" Milwaukee to the T-Rex Extreme (with the latter being unknown length).

    Bookmark   September 9, 2011 at 12:27PM
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brickeyee

It is not that big a decision.

The blades are not all that expensive.

Buy one of each and try them out.

I usually avoid any product with 'testimonial advertising' since there is no way to verify the person is other than a paid shill.

'New' is not always better.

    Bookmark   September 9, 2011 at 1:48PM
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jally

Thanks again! Can you please clarify the following? (is there any diagram to explain this:

just be sure to cut through the bark on the underside closer to the trunk before moving to the top of the limb to prevent bark stripping.

    Bookmark   September 10, 2011 at 11:02PM
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brickeyee

If you cut off any limb but the very smallest only from the top there is a chance of the limb falling before the bark on the bottom has been cut through.

Depending on the plant, this can result in the bark stripping in a line below the limb and down the trunk.

To prevent this a shallow cut is made on the bottom half of the limb to sever the bark.
This cut is made first, and then you go back and cut slightly further out from the top.

Any stripping will stop at the first cut.

The final cut close to the trunk (for a tree) is than made on the short branch stub left.
The cut should be very close to the trunk bark, but not damage the 'collar' around the base of the former limb.
The collar is where the bark will grow from to cover the wound.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2011 at 11:17AM
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annzgw

Can't add much to the other answers except the cutting length of the blade depends on the saw you're using. My Bosch has a base plate that prevents 3" of the blade from actually cutting so I end up using only 5" of the cutting surface of a 9" blade.
I've used all the brands you mentioned except the T-Rex and right now I'm using Vermont American 'The Ugly' pruning blades. I usually just buy what I can find locally.

One other cutting tip........if the limb is long and heavy, cut off half the branch before attempting to cut it at the trunk. Makes for safer pruning.

    Bookmark   September 11, 2011 at 6:04PM
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jally

well, I found a video that animates what you meant (since i was confused because my situation isn't so relevant, but rather junk growths in the form of saplings, etc.

Here's the video:

Here is a link that might be useful: video

    Bookmark   September 11, 2011 at 8:37PM
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