Anyone know how to join X-legs for table?

enigmaquandryAugust 2, 2010

I am new to woodworking though very willing to learn! I am going to make a farmhouse table for our home and am interested in the X-leg, trestle table style. My questions are mostly about its integrity...while beautiful, this style of leg SEEMS to be the least strong just because you are putting all the weight of the table on the one spot where both planks intersect (with the extra mortise and tenon going through it).

Linked is a picture of what I'm trying to figure out...thank you so much for your help!

Here is a link that might be useful: X-leg table

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brickeyee

The joint is usually a half lap.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 10:32AM
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aidan_m

This joint is totally strong if done correctly. The srufaces fit tightly together creating a large surface area to bear the load. The truss shape is extremely stable: load forces are perfectly balanced between compression and tension with greater lateral stability than a straight legged table. The place where the legs intersect may seem to be a weak point, however the load is not bearing on the weakened side of the timber. The half lap joint is actually much more stable than a simple cross bolted timber truss with no mortisses.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2010 at 12:27PM
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jey_l

If you are building it yourself, and especially if you are using a thinner material for the legs incorporate a brace as seen on the benches. I would modify the design to match that as these are notoriously wobbly tables . What are the finished dimensions of the table top?

    Bookmark   August 3, 2010 at 5:29PM
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jey_l

If you are building it yourself, and especially if you are using a thinner material for the legs incorporate a brace as seen on the benches. I would modify the design to match that as these are notoriously wobbly tables . What are the finished dimensions of the table top?

    Bookmark   August 3, 2010 at 7:20PM
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sombreuil_mongrel

Hi,
I would make the stretcher's tenon on the diagonal, so it was a square hole piercing the half lap, which is going to remove less wood from critical areas. It's just as much work to cut a diamond-shaped tenon on the stretcher as to cut a diamond shape mortise through the legs, so it balances out. The one way is just stronger.
Let us see how it comes out.
Casey

    Bookmark   August 3, 2010 at 8:25PM
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enigmaquandry

Wow, thank you everyone! I'm not entirely sure how I will make the cuts but I finally understand how it should be done! Thank you so much for your advice, I'm hoping this project may become the beginning of a new hobby. I love basic carpentry for the house but this will be my first furniture attempt.

I had been considering what seems to me to be a simpler style (since all I have is a jigsaw, chopsaw and hacksaw) joined by bolts instead of mortise and tenon...I couldn't find a good picture so I threw this togeether as a side and front view, would this be better? I like the look of both tables.

From [house](http://picasaweb.google.com/christy.henninger/House?feat=embedwebsite)
    Bookmark   August 4, 2010 at 6:22PM
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