New sub panel - securing feed cables to back of panel

remodelboyApril 26, 2013

The feeder cables to my new sub panel come up through the bottom.

The electrician said that it wouldn't pass inspection unless the large feeder cables were secured to the back of the panel. He secured it with the adhesive square mounting plates and pull ties. It passed, but now the adhesive squares have let go and the tension on the cables has them pushing against the back of the cover plate.

What is the best way to secure the cables to the back of the cabinet so they won't keep letting go?

Thanks in advance!

RC

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Ron Natalie

That's silly. I know the devices you're talking about and they'd never be useful for what he used them for nor would they have been acceptable if such securing was required.

If your feeder is some cable, the fittings that admit it into the panel enclosure are typically all that is needed. If you have conduit vertical conduit runs, there are special supports installed in the conduit. I've never heard of installing support inside the panel enclosure. As long as you don't violate the bend limits, you typically go straight to the lugs.

    Bookmark   April 26, 2013 at 9:57AM
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mm11

The easiest way to solve your problem is turn off the breaker, undo the termination on the load side, reshape the wire, and put it all back together.

    Bookmark   April 26, 2013 at 11:06AM
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brickeyee

The cable clamp or conduit hub into the panel is all that is required unless there is a very strange local code rule.

    Bookmark   April 26, 2013 at 1:34PM
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btharmy

Are the wires pushing against the panel cover to the point that there is a noticable gap? If not, leave it. There is nothing in the National Electric Code that requires the wires to be secured in the panel. If the cover is being pushed out, do as mm11 suggested and form the conductors ( sometimes referred to as training ) so they stay in place without any tension. Sometimes it is as easy as twisting each conductor 180 degrees and then re terminating them. If done properly, they should maintain their position without any strapping before being terminated.

    Bookmark   April 26, 2013 at 4:35PM
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remodelboy

Thanks for all of the responses!

Yeah, the cover plate has to be pushed against the cables and the tension of the cables actually tweaks the main breaker enough to keep it from fitting into the opening in the cover plate without some manipulation.

I can fix it now! Thanks again!

RC

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 1:05AM
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Ron Natalie

What sort of dumbass panel is this. The main breaker ought to be stouter than that. Technically, subpanels don't need a main breaker (they are protected by the OCD on the feeder). If you're backfeeding the panel through a breaker, it is required that it is held in by a listed method (which ought to be secure).

Anyhow, as pointed out, if you are putting torque on the breaker/terminals, the wire's not installed right. Fix it. Little stick on wire tie holders are NOT a solution.

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 9:04AM
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brickeyee

"Yeah, the cover plate has to be pushed against the cables and the tension of the cables actually tweaks the main breaker enough to keep it from fitting into the opening in the cover plate without some manipulation. "

Wire dress is not correct.

Form and trim to lay against the inside BACK of the panel.

Panels with feeds not at the back quickly turn into a PITA to to route branch circuit conductors.

There always seems to be a feed in the way.

It can take some force to form larger conductors, and 'tight laid' 4/0 aluminum is a real chore (the wire was run through a forming die to make it more circular before jacketing, leaving the individual conductors distorted so they cannot slide as easily across each other as the cable is bent.

If you look at the end of a cleanly cut cable you will notice all the flat spots between the wires.

The individual conductors are spiral laid to make forming easier, the tight packaging makes them stiffer.

    Bookmark   April 27, 2013 at 10:07AM
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