Waiving Permits but Maintaining NEC

plumeriavineMarch 6, 2010

Thinking out loud here - -

I found something in the municipal code that says that no permits are required for anything running less than 25 volts.

However, NEC is adopted as the electrical code.

So, do you think that means that I can pay someone to wire a low voltage doorbell and we don't need a permit BUT they still need to observe NEC rules?

I'll call the city to see what they think on Monday, but I wondered how you interpret it.

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tim45z10

If you are talking specifically about a doorbell. Keep in mind they have wireless models available.

    Bookmark   March 6, 2010 at 5:46PM
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plumeriavine

Would wireless models get interference from other electronics in the area?

    Bookmark   March 6, 2010 at 6:24PM
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wayne440

"Would wireless models get interference from other electronics in the area?"

Considering the kind of luck you seem to be having with other aspects of your project, an interference issue is likely.

    Bookmark   March 6, 2010 at 8:22PM
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Ron Natalie

Just because a permit is not required doesn't mean the code is not applicable. An electrician that refuses to work according to the code just because nobody is watching should be sent packing.

    Bookmark   March 7, 2010 at 8:25AM
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brickeyee

Low voltage circuits are covered, but the rules are greatly relaxed for power limited low voltage circuits like doorbells and thermostat wiring.

The multiple amps of 12 V under cabinet lighting from a single large transformer do NOT meet the power limited requirements.

Higher power low voltage wiring that is concealed in walls must still use an approved wiring method.

    Bookmark   March 7, 2010 at 8:54AM
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plumeriavine

Power limited - that is my new word of the day.

Are class 2 and power limited synonyms?

If you have a Class 2 transformer, then your wire still needs to be listed, right? There would be markings on the wire saying CL2? or CL3?

That wire, the CL2 wire, if it is so marked, would still need protection near studs?

    Bookmark   March 7, 2010 at 4:21PM
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brickeyee

Class 2 is one of the power limited categories.

Doorbells and thermostats usually fall into this class.

    Bookmark   March 7, 2010 at 6:04PM
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