Using 'zone control relay' for non-heating application...

pharkusMarch 9, 2010

Alright, so I've got some lights I need to link up to a circuit with low-voltage contact outputs. I've also got a 4-zone ZCR sitting here.

The lights are 150W incandescents, one per "channel".

From a technical standpoint, if the relays are capable of handling motor/pump loads, they darn well shouldn't have a problem with lamps. Nobody is going to convince me this is UNSAFE.

That said, I do want to know, am I officially allowed to do this?

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brickeyee

Relays have contact ratings.

Find out what the rating of the one you have is.

    Bookmark   March 9, 2010 at 4:06PM
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pharkus

Info online: "15A max combined load".

Label from one of the four relays itself: "250VAC 15A".

I know it's electrically fine, I'm just wondering about code/legality.

    Bookmark   March 9, 2010 at 7:02PM
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maryland_irisman

Most relays serve multiple functions, not just the duty they perform in a particular piece of equipment. As brickeyee suggested, make sure you are within the rated range of the contacts.

    Bookmark   March 9, 2010 at 7:08PM
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pharkus

Can someone PLEASE just tell me if I'm violating the NEC by using this product for an application the manufacturer did not intend? You know, since both of my posts so far have stated that I already knew what I was later told anyway?

I'm not just talking about a plain-jane standalone relay from Radio Shack, or a contactor. This is a "Zone Control Relay": a Taco SR504-2, intended for controlling circulator pumps for heating.

I know I am within the ratings. I'm not asking if I am nor whether or not it will work, or be safe. As I stated in both of my posts, I only want to know if it is LEGAL. That's IT.

    Bookmark   March 10, 2010 at 4:23AM
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brickeyee

"Can someone PLEASE just tell me if I'm violating the NEC by using this product for an application the manufacturer did not intend? You know, since both of my posts so far have stated that I already knew what I was later told anyway?"

How do you know what the manufacturer intended the part for?

If you do use the part consistent with any UL listing it has you are fine.

The NEC does not really cover the internal wiring and components of equipment, that is NEMA.

    Bookmark   March 10, 2010 at 10:59AM
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manchild

If it's not part of it's intended use then it is not UL listed for that application and that is in fact a violation of code. You need to follow the manufacturers instructions and specifications on all parts you use. Not sure if that answers your question

    Bookmark   March 10, 2010 at 7:10PM
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manchild

It'll def. be in the building code

    Bookmark   March 10, 2010 at 7:20PM
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brickeyee

"If it's not part of it's intended use then it is not UL listed for that application and that is in fact a violation of code."

UL listings for discrete parts like relays do not normally define an "intended use."

They define the loads that a relay can control in terms of resistive, inductive, horsepower, etc.

What load you control is not defined as long as it falls within the ratings of the relay.

    Bookmark   March 10, 2010 at 8:41PM
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pharkus

That's the problem, brickeyee. I'm not sure that what I'm talking about constitutes a discrete part.

I know I can buy components at Radio Shack and build things. Then I am obviously following the manufacturer's instructions, because I am the manufacturer.

I am not talking about just a "relay". I am talking about a preassembled circuit board containing a transformer, four relays, and some screw terminals. It is INTENDED to control circulator pumps on zoned heating systems.

I am not controlling pumps on a boiler. I am controlling lights.

Frankly it's too late, I needed this answer two days ago, and I've already installed the darn thing. I KNOW it is electrically safe, I was just hoping (for my own sake - as there is no inspection process here) to find out ahead of time if what I was trying to do was 100% officially legal.

    Bookmark   March 10, 2010 at 11:16PM
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bus_driver

If installed a suitable enclosure, just use it and move on to other things.

    Bookmark   March 11, 2010 at 8:06AM
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pharkus

I can't find the exact one I have (used/salvage stuff) but here's a similar one that is currently available:

    Bookmark   March 12, 2010 at 7:29PM
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