How to select the best electrician

johnhoshMarch 27, 2013

Hi,
IâÂÂm starting a new business and rented an old building. Right now IâÂÂm looking for a best commercial electrician to upgrade the building. There are many electrical contractors in my city and I have to choose the best one for this job. I need suggestion on how can I select the best electrician. What question should I ask him and things to keep in mind while interviewing him?

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randy427

Get bids from several. Make sure to talk to someone who would be involved in the job, not just an estimator that you'll never see again. Try to get referrals from others who have had similar work performed.
Ask them what they see recommend be included that may be over and above code minimum requirements and listen how they respond to your ideas for what is needed.
Then consider your impression as to whether they are professional enough to do a good job. Then look at their estimate.
JMHO

    Bookmark   March 27, 2013 at 2:26PM
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Janiman

While choosing an electrician for your commercial needs, you have to be very specific to the kind of experience the electrician has within his field. You need to keep yourself updated regarding the issue at hand before you decide to hire the services of this electrician. Check on the local contractors and choose the most experienced electrician for your work and make sure that he is holding a valid license to practice the profession. The electricians working in the industry arena are specialized in some type hence, knowing about the issue beforehand helps lots. Read this article "How to Choose the Right Electrician". You will learn many other key points for choosing the right person for this job.

    Bookmark   March 27, 2013 at 3:14PM
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glennsparky

I really like the two previous posts. A big red flag is anyone who wants to do work without a permit. Inspectors really keep folks from cutting corners. Even if the inspector may not catch it, in the back of the sparky's mind is "is it worth it?".

Cross out (before signing) the part of any contract that restricts access to the jobsite until completion. Tell the sparky that someone is randomly going to show up to inspect the work in progress. A friend retired from the business, a hired third party inspector, put it in the contract.

If some contractors walk away from the bid, you probably didn't want them anyway.

    Bookmark   March 27, 2013 at 3:50PM
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petey_racer

" Make sure to talk to someone who would be involved in the job, not just an estimator that you'll never see again."
It's lovely to want these things, but in the real world you may not have a choice. MANY times and owner or estimator will come out to look at a job and they are not the ones doing the work. This is simply a real world fact. If you don't like it don't hire them.

"A big red flag is anyone who wants to do work without a permit. Inspectors really keep folks from cutting corners. Even if the inspector may not catch it, in the back of the sparky's mind is "is it worth it?"."
This is usually the mentality of an unlicensed or unqualified person.
Most real electricians will either insist on it or go by your call.
In my area it is the GC/client that decides whether a permit or inspections will happen. If I get inspections on smaller jobs but no one else on the job dies it raises all kind of red flags for the client since our inspections are third party and separate from the building dept.

"Cross out (before signing) the part of any contract that restricts access to the jobsite until completion. Tell the sparky that someone is randomly going to show up to inspect the work in progress."
I have NEVER in my life heard of a contractor restricting access to someone's own property, and I have seen a lot of contracts. I can't see how this would be legal, OR logical. WHAT would be the benefit of this???
Maybe it's a Florida thing?

"A friend retired from the business, a hired third party inspector, put it in the contract. "
THIS I would be pissed at. If you don't trust me enough that you would get my work RE-inspected I don't want to work for you. I can just imaging all the other headaches a customer like this would cause. If this was even suggested I would say thanks but no thanks.

    Bookmark   March 28, 2013 at 7:06AM
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texasredhead

I am curious about your comment that this is a rented building. Have you discussed your electrical upgrade plans with the building owner?

    Bookmark   March 28, 2013 at 9:50AM
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elltwo

@petey_racer

Please tell us there a misspelled word near the middle of your response about "A big red flag..."

    Bookmark   March 29, 2013 at 9:05AM
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petey_racer

HAHAHAHAHA!! OK, you got me. LOL

Yes, it's a typo. :)

    Bookmark   March 29, 2013 at 4:35PM
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henrysccott

Finding a good plumber or electrician is a difficult task for home owners. Once you have finished your homework and selected a plumber or electrician, make sure you both sign a detailed contract.

high bay led lighting solution

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 8:25AM
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joefixit2

"A friend retired from the business, a hired third party inspector, put it in the contract. "

I had this happen where a friend or relative would stop by to "check on our work". One in particular started snapping pictures. The GC blew up and threw him off the site, using many bad words in the process. It was very entertaining. Another time the owner's son, who was a fireman showed up. He questioned why we were not sleeving the Romex in short pieces of conduit where it passed through drilled holes in the framing. He said it could get hot and start the wood on fire. He was dead serious. We just chuckled and kept working.

This post was edited by joefixit2 on Wed, Jun 18, 14 at 9:17

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 9:11AM
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joefixit2

One of the best ways to get a good tradesman is to talk to people that have used them.

This post was edited by joefixit2 on Wed, Jun 18, 14 at 9:28

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 9:13AM
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Ron Natalie

Joe's got it. With trades just like any other personal service, REFERENCES preferably from people you trust are the key.

    Bookmark   June 18, 2014 at 9:57AM
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