What's like Acrylacq but widely available?

andaleeMarch 28, 2012

I'm dizzy from all of the descriptions of various clear finishes for wood, and their various pro's & con's. Does anyone know of something as safe as (or nearly so) Acrylacq, but widely available? We're finishing pine T&G for the ceiling before putting it up, and I just can't bear to google anymore . . . I need an intelligent life form with experience to add a reasonable opinion. ;o)

Any thoughts?

(Cross-posted to the painting forum, because I'm desperate. :o)

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HandyMac

Don't understand the safe part. All currently available finishes for home use are safe when dry.

Varnish, from a real paint store. Likie Sherwin Williams. B. More is more expensive. Pratt Lambert and others.

Water based is clear. Easier to apply than WB polyurethane.

    Bookmark   March 28, 2012 at 6:11PM
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andalee

The "when dry" is the kicker. We're DIY'ing this, and I want to use something that doesn't require ventilators or open-air application to keep me from getting headaches or feeling ill. (Sorry, I should have included that initially.)

    Bookmark   March 29, 2012 at 12:49AM
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HandyMac

Water based finishes have very low VOC's and very little smell when applying/drying. They also do not add any color(unless made to do so).

    Bookmark   March 29, 2012 at 12:55PM
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brickeyee

"Water based finishes have very low VOC's and very little smell when applying/drying. They also do not add any color(unless made to do so)."

All correct.

They also do not 'melt' into previous coats as well as nitrocellulose lacquer.

Polyurethane is the same way.
Each coat hardens without melting into the previouse coat.

If you try to run out polyurethane and cut through a coat into a coat below it, very faint lines will be visible at the boundary between coats.

Nitrocellulose lacquer and shellac melt into previous coats forming a single film instead of a stack of layers.

    Bookmark   March 29, 2012 at 4:12PM
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