reinstaling old shutters w/new hinges

debndulcyMarch 23, 2011

I live in an over 70-year old house, which I've been trying to wrap a complete refurbishing up of...

The pins on the hinges of an original set of wooden shutters were rusted, and I finally located "replacements.'

Question is: after getting the old hinges off both the window and shutters, I was panning to mount the new ones in the same place. Should I reinforce the holes for screws with wood fill (or maybe epoxy) before re-mounting them?

I expect I could try to mount them in another place (higher or lower) and 'start over' with screw holes.. but not sure the placement would look as well.

THANK YOU for your (woodworking) educated advice/suggestions, I much appreciate it -

D.

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brickeyee

A lot depends on the condition of the wood you are attaching to.

Can you make the screws come up tight in the old holes?

If the wood is still solid enough for the screws to be tight you may not need to do anything.

If any are NOT tight you can try a couple thing.

If the wood is thick enough adding 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch, or even 3/4 inch to the screw length will get you into more wood.

Even going up one screw size (larger diameter) may be adequate.

You may need to adjust the countersink in the hardware for larger screw heads.

    Bookmark   March 24, 2011 at 10:25AM
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HandyMac

Or, you can glue(Wood glue) a toothpick or two in the old holes and use the original/replacement sized screws.

    Bookmark   March 24, 2011 at 2:22PM
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brickeyee

"Or, you can glue(Wood glue) a toothpick or two in the old holes and use the original/replacement sized screws."

If the shutters can fall on anyone I would want a little more of a sure bite into the wood.

    Bookmark   March 25, 2011 at 4:27PM
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aidan_m

I use the "toothpick" and glue trick all the time. Instead of toothpicks, I prefer hardwood dowels. Usually a 1/8" dowel works great. Leave the glue to dry overnight before drilling the new pilot hole.

Even a broken-off brass screw can be drilled out and restored using a 3/8" dowel.

    Bookmark   March 25, 2011 at 5:23PM
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debndulcy

Thank you, thank you..! Although the wood seems stable.. to best of my knowledge (the screws were a little loose previously, but there was some rust, too) they're only over 70 years old.

I have toothpicks, and will pick up some 1/8 dowel tomorrow... should I expect my drill to just power through either?

Thanks again --

D.

    Bookmark   March 26, 2011 at 11:11PM
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aidan_m

"should I expect my drill to just power through?"

Still drill a new pilot hole. Pick up a Vix bit, a self-centering drill bit.

The reason for letting the glue dry overnight is to get a good pilot hole, without removing the plug.

Here is a link that might be useful: Vix Bit

    Bookmark   March 28, 2011 at 2:02PM
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