4 mil window film, useful for security?

jbsjbsJuly 26, 2011

Interested in adding some security to a few especially vulnerable windows in a home. I'd like to make them a bit harder to smash. Not enough of a threat that I'm interested in replacing the windows, but hoping to add some deterrence to what would otherwise be an easy smash and enter.

I got a bid on 4-mil film to be applied to the windows, which range from 8 inches wide to large sliding door panels. Of course, the only way I'll know whether they work well is if I take one and try to smash it. :-) So I thought I'd ask all of you fine folks . . . would adding a layer of 4-mil (or 6-, or 8- . . .) film to one side of a window make it significantly more resistant to breaking through it?

Thanks for any advice!

--Jason

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GulfBreezeWindows

If they smash it, it will hold the glass in place. But it may not deter a thief, they can just cut the film.

I don't really trust it, I've seen demo's were a person broke through a single pane piece of glass in less than 10 seconds.

If you get it, make sure the installer lays a bead of silicone around the edge of the film.

    Bookmark   July 26, 2011 at 4:51PM
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ShatterSafe

Most unlikely that a thief can just "cut the film". The concept of the film is to delay entry to a premises so that they hopefully get frustrated and leave. The film turns your regular glass into a laminated glass much the same as your car windshield. The glass may fracture but the film holds the glass in place to the film. For regular house glass, do not apply anything thicker than SSF-800 ( Shatter Safe 8 mil film) Film to glass will strengthen the glass at least by double. Once you install the film, be sure to lock the film and the glass into place with a product called Dow Corning 995. This will help make the film, glass and frame one solid unit. DO NOT USE SILICONE, it will become brittle over time and not be effective. This sealant is the same product that is utilized by film companies world wide and is the only pliable type product recommended.

Good luck, and remember that the concept is to slow down intrusion. If they want in, they are going to get in.

Cheers
Al Montgomery
Founder.
Shatter Safe

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 10:36AM
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ShatterSafe

If 4 mil, be certain it is 4 mil, 2 ply. 4 mil 1 ply is a bit cheaper but is for safety, not security.

Good luck.

Al

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 10:38AM
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PRO
Windows on Washington

You realize that Dow 995 is a Silicone right?

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 11:10AM
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GulfBreezeWindows

Ok, everyone is entitled to how they believe installs and products work, but...

1. Pure silicone of a high grade will NOT get brittle and crack.

2. A film on the outside of the glass DOES NOT make it a laminated window.

3. A car windshield is a special piece of glass that does NOT have a film on the inside or outside, but inbtween the glass. Like a laminated impact window.

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 11:10AM
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millworkman

WOW,

"Dow Corning� 995 Silicone Structural Sealant"
if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck it must be a _________?

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 11:35AM
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ShatterSafe

mhmmm.. a duck. Normally when people talk about silicone they are referring to the type you buy at lowes/home depot etc that does not work effectively. As for the laminate idea, The film goes on the INSIDE of your residence/building, not outside. When we say "laminated" we of course realize that there are two pieces of glass to a car windshield, but the film is laminated onto the glass.

Either way... some security is better than no security at all of course, and that is all I was trying to point out to Jason. Cheers. Al from Shatter Safe

    Bookmark   July 29, 2011 at 9:01PM
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PRO
Windows on Washington

In the case of laminated glass, the plastic interlayer (usually PVB) is between two layers of tempered glass when dealing with a car windshield.

Most of the silicone as HD and big box stores are intended for bath and wet area applications. They have different cure mechanisms and should not be used. A glazing silicone is different and should be used in this application.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2011 at 10:53AM
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brickeyee

"In the case of laminated glass, the plastic interlayer (usually PVB) is between two layers of tempered glass when dealing with a car windshield."

Windshield glass is NOT tempered.
It shatters into large pieces that are held together by the laminate layer with no edges exposed.

If the glass was tempered it would have no strength one the glass shattered except for the laminate layer (the entire layer of glass would fracture into crumbs completely).

Windshields are designed to keep objects from penetrating and occupants from ejecting.
Tempered glass is designed to fracture into crumbs that have less of a chance of cutting and do not have large and heavy pieces with shartp edges falling.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2011 at 12:32PM
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PRO
Windows on Washington

Thank you again brickeyee.

I meant to say annealed.

Tempered glass in side windows and back glass.

Windshields are annealed/laminated glass.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2011 at 2:24PM
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oberon476

Yep and imagine trying to see thru that fractured windshield if it was made with tempered glass...it wouldn't be fun.

Also, when a forehead impacts a windshield something is going to break - either the windshield or the forhead - preferably it's the windshield and not the forehead. Using tempered glass in a windshield would really increase the chance that it's the forehead and very possibly a neck as well.

Compared with laminated glass used in architectural applications, windshields are fabricated using a lower adhesion PVB interlayer. The lower adhesion allows for what is called "controlled delamination" so that the interlayer will expand like a balloon when the glass breaks on impact. The idea is that the expanding interlayer will absorb a portion of the impact force.

Dow 995 is probably the most widely used structural silicone to bond the laminated glass to the sash/frame in hurricane impact windows. It comes in black, gray, and white (not clear) so if it is used in a exposed application it will be visible.

Dow 995 is an amazing product, but don't ever try to separate anything bonded by 995, it ain't gonna happen.

    Bookmark   July 30, 2011 at 3:05PM
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brickeyee

"Also, when a forehead impacts a windshield something is going to break - either the windshield or the forhead - preferably it's the windshield and not the forehead. Using tempered glass in a windshield would really increase the chance that it's the forehead and very possibly a neck as well. "

The problem that shows up with head to windshield impacts is sometimes 'scalping' of one degree or another.

The plastic layer is strong and elastic enough to allow the head 'bullseye' to form.
The pieces of broken glass separate enough for hair and sometimes scalp to enter the gaps.
As the person then recoils away from the broken glass hair and scalp can be trapped in the fractures.

Usually a lot of hair rips out.
Occasionally scalp stays behind.

Wear you seat belts.

    Bookmark   July 31, 2011 at 9:28AM
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oberon476

Amen to that!

    Bookmark   July 31, 2011 at 5:24PM
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PRO
Windows on Washington

Watch my mother put her head through a side window during and accident. It gives you another appreciation for how hard tempered glass is.

I can imagine there would be a much higher scull and neck fracture rate if windshields did have tempered glass in them.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2011 at 12:12AM
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oberon476

There is no doubt about that at all.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2011 at 7:31AM
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brickeyee

I remember treating a policeman years ago for a broken wrist from trying to use a large Mag-lite flashlight to smash a side window.

He swung as hard as he could, the flashlight bounced off, and he ended up with a broken wrist.

    Bookmark   August 1, 2011 at 9:22AM
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PRO
Windows on Washington

Take a look at the video of this reporter trying to break the window. He wound up cutting a tendon from the glass and requiring reconstructive surgery.

Here is a link that might be useful: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L91_K-s4pMM

    Bookmark   August 2, 2011 at 8:49AM
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brickeyee

Not the brightest guys there.

They would have been through tempered glass with one hit of the claws on the hammer.

There are some side windows now using laminated glass.
I saw a Mercedes with a broken passenger side front window that was laminated the other day in traffic.

Going through laminated in an emergency uses a hatchet with a modified blade to hook and cut the plastic layer.
You just chop away.

    Bookmark   August 2, 2011 at 12:18PM
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