How todetermine amps from Hz

frank_diyFebruary 6, 2012

I bought a GE cook-top and in the installation manual it reads: This cooktop features pilotless electric ignition for

energy savings and reliability. It operates on a 120 volt,

60 Hz power supply. A separate circuit, protected by a

15 amp time delay fuse or circuit breaker, is required.

I'm not sure what to do with '60 Hz'. Can the amps that it draws be derived from this?

thanks

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stinkytiger

Hi,

I think that because you are in the USA, then all residential power is 60 Hz. 60 Hz refers to the frequency of the power. In general, unless you are in some special off site situation, all power is 60Hz in the USA. So I think it is safe for you to forget about the 60Hz bit of information, and just take it for granted.

I think that the power, hence amps you need is 15 amps. So you need a circuit which will supply 15 amps. That cirucit should be protected by a 15 amp breaker.

best, Mike.

    Bookmark   February 6, 2012 at 4:56PM
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bus_driver

Hz is the abbreviation for Hertz, a man who was honored by having the term named after him. The power company controls the Hz and controls it very precisely and carefully. It is not related to amperes.

    Bookmark   February 6, 2012 at 4:56PM
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frank_diy

thanks for the info.

    Bookmark   February 6, 2012 at 4:59PM
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adinota3

Dont worry about how many ampers the pilot light works off of. if you place it on its oun circuit you will be fine. By the way Hertz is the frequency of the electricity its how many times the electricity goes from postive 60V to negative 60V and the difference between the two peaks are 120V whitch all american standard equipment is made to work off of. If you want to find Amps you need to know the voltage a piece of equipment runs off of and the Watts. by dividing watts over volts you can find the Ampers or resistance of your equipment ex. if you have light bulb that is a 60Watt bulb that runs off of 120Volts it draws .5 Amps but a 250Watt bulb that works off of 120Volts draws 2.08 Amps each. Hope this helps.

-Anthony

    Bookmark   February 7, 2012 at 10:07AM
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Ron Natalie

Actually it's the number of times in a second that a complete cycle (for example from the most positive value back around to the most positive value again).

Voltage is a potential difference, so it is meaningless without a reference, but I've never EVER seen house current referenced to a point halfway between the +120V to ground reference that is usually used.

For a resistive load (like a conventional light bulb) power (watts) is potential (volts) times current (amps). For inductive loads (like motors) the power may not be quite as high as that value (power factor).

    Bookmark   February 7, 2012 at 10:16AM
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brickeyee

"electricity goes from postive 60V to negative 60V and the difference between the two peaks are 120V whitch all american standard equipment is made to work off of. "

Regrettably, it is not that easy.

The overall voltage is specified as Volts, Root Mean Square, VRMS.

The peaks would NOT be RMS, but just volts, so sqrt(2) * 120 V = ~169.7 V would be the peak voltage that occurs as a positive peak and then a negative peak 60 times per second (60 Hertz).

Meters are designed to measure RMS for AC waveforms, and plain volts for DC.
Many digital meters can handle non-sinusoidal voltages up to a specified frequency (after that they can read high or low depending on how non-sinusoidal the voltage waveform is).

    Bookmark   February 7, 2012 at 10:59AM
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dkenny

stinkytiger..ever hear about the 80% rule??

no you cannot determine power from hertz..they are not related..
how hertz in DC? NONE..how many amps..depends??
power depends on volts and amps not freq(hertz)
P=VI..or IE..no freq in the equation..

nit pick if you want hertz and power are not related.

-dkenny

    Bookmark   February 9, 2012 at 6:10PM
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Ron Natalie

The 80% "rule" doesn't apply here. The cooktop doesn't say it draws 15 AMPS it says that it requires a 15A circuit. If the installation instructions say you must use a separate 15A circuit, that is what you are obliged to install.

    Bookmark   February 10, 2012 at 6:49AM
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brickeyee

"A separate circuit, protected by a
15 amp time delay fuse or circuit breaker, is required. "

Does it say "required" or 'recomended'?

It really matters here.

You also need to exactly understand the circuit rating.
Does it say '15 amps only' (or other restrictive words?

Gas ranges ARE allowed on the 20 amp kitchen counter small appliance branch circuits since the 120 V load from a gas range is normally very small (an oven light, the igniter electronics, and maybe a clock or oven controls).

    Bookmark   February 10, 2012 at 9:22AM
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