Reglazing vs wood strips for window panes

chopin4May 10, 2013

I'm having my old windows repainted and the painter suggested using wood trim for the panes instead of traditional glazing. What are the advantages vs. disadvantages?

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windowsonwashington

I am not sure there are any advantages.

How does he propose to keep them water tight?

    Bookmark   May 10, 2013 at 9:54PM
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toddinmn

If you go with a vinyl stop the glass should siliconed to the frame for a air/ water seal.
Putty glazing can be harder to install for some which may be why he wants to go that route, or maybe because the painter is suppose to paint the glazing and doesn't want to wait for it skin over.
Oil based putty would be the traditional and time test way which is the way I would go in most cases.
What is the painters reason for choosing a vinyl stops?

    Bookmark   May 11, 2013 at 2:23AM
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brickeyee

"old windows"

How old?

If they are old enough they are likely worth preserving.

1950s on, not so much.

    Bookmark   May 11, 2013 at 1:17PM
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chopin4

The house was built in 1870 and the windows are original. The stops would not be vinyl they would be wood. This is in an historic district with strict restoration guidelines. Time is an issue with regard to waiting for the glaze to cure because the job went from a strip and paint job to a total restoration of the wood because of neglect by previous owners. This is adding a lot of time and money. I'm not sure how he proposes making them water tight. I was thinking setting them in silicone but will definitely ask.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2013 at 9:52AM
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windowsonwashington

Be careful with the silicone. If any pushes out or gets on the stop, they will not be easily paintable.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2013 at 12:21PM
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toddinmn

Usually one would paint the windows and stops before glas is put in. Being this is historical glazing would pe preffered and a good glazer coold reglaze these just as fast as putting in vinyl strips. The only that would take longer is painting the glaze which may not be needed depneding on the look your going for.

    Bookmark   May 12, 2013 at 2:14PM
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brickeyee

The wood those windows are made from is simply not available anymore.

It is likely virgin growth wood with very tight growth rings, one of the reasons it has made it this long.

If there are any soft spots they can be hardened with epoxy (or wood hardener) and then filled in and restored (Minwax High Performance Wood Filler).

Under primer and two coats of paint you will not be able to tell a repair has been done.

I still prefer the Minwax filler over epoxy fillers.

The epoxy ones always seem to end up harder than the wood and tend to cause dishing of the wood around them when sanding.

The Minwax matches closer to wood hardness (and better than Bondo also). You can feather it out for undetectable repairs.

If you need to match details you can use wood chisels when the material is partly set to carve it to approximate shape, then finish up after it hardens completely (I give it 24 hours).

You can even make a reverse sanding form by pressing sandpaper against the surface and then backing it up with Bondo.
Allow it to set. Adding a thin\n wooden strip saves on the amount of Bondo required and provides something less likely to break in use.

Slide your sanding form along the wood and repair for a perfect match.

This post was edited by brickeyee on Sun, May 12, 13 at 15:02

    Bookmark   May 12, 2013 at 2:57PM
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toddinmn

The wood is still available form recailmed resources.
I had a couple of exterior doors made a couple of years ago for a historic project form reclaimed wood. he also makes historic storm sashes from reclaimed wood. The doors were to be repaired but it was much easier to replace due to the extensive rot.The Historic Society never new the difference.

    Bookmark   May 13, 2013 at 1:26AM
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brickeyee

"The wood is still available form recailmed resources. "

Sort of, at often ridiculous prices.

    Bookmark   May 13, 2013 at 10:31AM
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