Tempered Glass

swmotzMay 8, 2013

I want to start this message off stating once again, thank you all for sharing your knowledge. Thank you!

I do have yet another question: If the glass is tempered and has a lowE coating, does the tempering cause the green tint to be a bit more noticeable?

I realize tempering doesn't create any green tint (I also realize that the lowE doesn't create a green tint -- I just learned the green is caused by the iron in the glass and the lowE coatings just cause us to see the green more). But, I'm wondering if the tempering causes us to see the green more too?

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toddinmn

I have never noticed the difference.

    Bookmark   May 8, 2013 at 7:40PM
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millworkman

No tempering changes absolutely nothing visually in the lass.

    Bookmark   May 8, 2013 at 9:16PM
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windowsonwashington

+1

No difference will be noticeable.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 8:32AM
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swmotz

How about the AMOUNT OF GLASS? If I'm looking at a 4" x 4" sample of glass, will it be just as green tinted as a 30" x 30" piece of glass?

I just hate the green tint that lowE glass has--that's one of the main reasons I'm wanting to get 180 glass (something I know I shouldn't do in St. Louis). The Marvin store in town has both 366 and 272 glass in their doors and windows. This glass looks very green. Now, when I bring that little 4 x 4 piece of glass home to my house and look at it, it doesn't look nearly as green. Does anyone know why this is?

Thanks! Stephanie

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 9:56AM
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brickeyee

" The Marvin store in town has both 366 and 272 glass in their doors and windows. This glass looks very green."

The apparent color of glass will change based on the light it is being transmitted and reflected .

Lay the sample down on a white piece of paper ad you will have doubled the color change (light going through, reflecting off paper, light coming back out).

The light reflected from the surface stays the same.

Cutting the paper to the size of the sample will limit extraneous reflections from the extra paper.

This post was edited by brickeyee on Thu, May 9, 13 at 11:46

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 11:45AM
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millworkman

Now just to add to your confusion, not all Low E will have a green tint. I have seen many times blue and purple tints. It seems to come down to the glass manufacturer. It is actually the glass that has a slight color to it not the Low E as think about shower door glass, it is not Low E but will have a tint to it. To get crystal clear in a shower glass they use Low Iron Glass.

This post was edited by millworkman on Thu, May 9, 13 at 13:30

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 1:27PM
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brickeyee

The clearer the glass the higher the price.

The glass used to make optical fibers is so clear light can go miles through it.

It is also much stronger and painfully expensive to make (even before drawing into fibers).

Very clear glass gets used to make bullet resistant glass so you can have 6 inches of thickness and it still looks clear without a hint of color.

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 5:09PM
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swmotz

Yea, I learned about the starphire glass that PPG makes that has less iron in it, so there is less green tint when you add the lowE. But, what I'm wondering is if the more glass you have of whatever glass it is and whatever color it is, will the color seem more intense the larger the piece of glass is.

Thanks, Stephanie

    Bookmark   May 9, 2013 at 5:52PM
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millworkman

Like brick said I think it will depend more on the surroundings and what else is in the room.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2013 at 9:25AM
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Trapper1

The low-e coatings may be different on tempered glass even if they are called the same thing in the market (different coatings exist to withstand tempering temperatures). The appearance of these post-temporable coatings may vary a bit from coatings used on the standard annealed offering.

Also, 2.5 mm tempered glass can't be easily produced. If you are viewing mixed product, the tempered glass may be thicker allowing the green tint caused by the iron in the glass to be more noticable.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2013 at 2:58PM
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millworkman

Tempered and Annealed Low E coatings look exactly the same if they are the same Low E. I deal with them everyday.

    Bookmark   May 10, 2013 at 7:28PM
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swmotz

So, if I get the STC option with Infinity, which I think has one pane of glass the "normal" thickness and the other pane of glass a thicker thickness, then most likely the glass will appear greener than the double pane glass samples I've been looking at (they have the "normal" thickness for each pane of glass)?

Stephanie

    Bookmark   May 10, 2013 at 11:51PM
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oberon476

I'm a little late to comment on this thread, but just for fun, here is an edge comparison between low iron and standard float.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2013 at 9:41PM
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oberon476

And just to keep things interesting, here are a couple of laminated and edge-polished examples of low iron glass.

    Bookmark   May 14, 2013 at 9:47PM
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