New range on circuit with GFI outlet

annie.zzJanuary 20, 2010

I went to use my new KA range tonight and it shut off after 2 minutes. I realized that it's now on the same circuit as the new GFI outlet next to the stove and the GFI shuts down the circuit. (am I explaining this right?)

It seems to me that the range shouldn't on the same circuit with the GFI am I correct?

Or is this just an indication of an electrical problem with the new stove?

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Ron Natalie

Is this a gas range? If it's electric, there's no way it should be on the same circuit as a GFCI receptacle.

A little more detail please...

    Bookmark   January 20, 2010 at 7:10PM
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annie.zz

sorry - it's a gas range.

Here is a link that might be useful: kitchenaid range

    Bookmark   January 20, 2010 at 8:45PM
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randy427

I don't believe that an electronic ignition on a gas range is compatable with a GFCI protected circuit.

    Bookmark   January 20, 2010 at 9:16PM
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joed

It is permitted to be on the same circuit as the counter receptacles. If it trips the GFCI move the connection the connection that supply the range to the LINE side instead of the LOAD side of the GFCI.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 8:30AM
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Billl

"I went to use my new KA range tonight and it shut off after 2 minutes"

I think I need a little clarification here. How does a gas stove shut off after 2 minutes? The only electrical components of a gas stove will be a little circuit board to control the clock,lights etc and an ignition switch for the flame. Only the ignition switch has a chance of tripping a GFCI and that shouldn't be activating 2 minutes after you started the range. I would think it should trip as soon as you try the ignition switch or not at all.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 9:09AM
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brickeyee

"Only the ignition switch has a chance of tripping a GFCI and that shouldn't be activating 2 minutes after you started the range. I would think it should trip as soon as you try the ignition switch or not at all."

The ignition circuit on many higher end gas ranges shuts down the high voltage by sensing that the flam e is present.

It does this by leaking some current from the ignition electrode to ground through the flame itself (flames conduct very nicely).

This also allows for the high voltage to be turned back on to re-start the flame if it is blown out (a common problem on low simmer settings).

Depending on ow the circuit is wired you may need to add another GFCI receptacle.

A single GFCI receptacle can protect multiple regular receptacles wired to its 'LOAD' terminals.

You may have to find what GFCI receptacle is feeding the one behind the stove, and move the lines connected to the LOAD terminals to the LINE terminal.

Any plain downstream receptacles will NOT have GFCI protection.

Find the receptacle AFTER the stove and replace it with a new GFCI receptacle.

The lines feeding it get connected to the LINE terminals, and any other wires feeding other receptacles are connected to the LOAD terminals.

The single receptacle behind the stove is not NOT GFCI protected (and it does not need to be since it is NOT a counter receptacle).

The new GFCI protects receptacles after the stove receptacle.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 10:10AM
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Ron Natalie

Sorry Bill, I guess you haven't seen a modern gas stove with electronic ignition. The oven section is totally electronically controlled and will not run without power to the control unit. Further, this range has a rather intricate multivalved simmer/"power" burner which also requires electricity to function.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 11:17AM
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Billl

You are right - no high end appliances for me...... the OP should definitely listen to people who know far more about it than I. I was asking for clarification. I was just trying to figure out why the initial ignition would not trip a GFCI but something else in a range would. It obviously has nothing to do with the electronics, but if the ignition leaks back to ground during normal operation, then that would do it.

    Bookmark   January 21, 2010 at 1:09PM
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