hair dryer wiring

jbatts29January 23, 2011

ok so i'm the type of person who loves to make complex things out of simple crafts and I've run into a problem. I make these small glass ornaments and i color the inside of them with stained glass paint. the only way to get then to dry is to create circulation inside the ball. I built a contraption to dry six at a time using a hair dryer and some tubing. my problem is is that when i set the dryer on cool it still runs current through a small part of the heating element. this is just enough to cause over heating of the unit. every time i try to bypass this heating element the diodes on the contacts for the motor explode. what am i doing wrong? i can't seem to find the voltage for the motor and the only thing i can think of is that the heating wire provides enough resistance to lower the amount of current going in to the diodes. does this make sense?

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wayne440

Most hair dryers do use a portion of the heating element to drop the voltage going to the motor. Some hair dryer motors will run just fine on 12 volts DC.

As for what you are doing wrong- you are using a hairdryer well outside its designed use, when another device is bettter suited. A small blower would probably be more appropriate.

Here is a link that might be useful: blower

    Bookmark   January 23, 2011 at 6:29PM
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btharmy

Might I recommend a small, 120volt air matress pump. They can be had for less than $20 in most places. No heat, less $ to operate.

    Bookmark   January 23, 2011 at 8:14PM
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jbatts29

everything i read about the air mattress pumps is that they do overheat. i am looking into waynes suggestion though. all the air pumps i had found previously were way to expensive

    Bookmark   January 25, 2011 at 11:22PM
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joed

Aquarium pump.

    Bookmark   January 26, 2011 at 8:16AM
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jbatts29

i tried an aquarium pump but it just doesn't move the air enough

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 12:00AM
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joed

Vacuumm pump or cleaner.

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 8:11AM
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normel

How about a cabinet fan like this:

Here is a link that might be useful: cabinet cooling fans

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 9:51AM
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ionized_gw

Ideally you will have a blower rather than a fan so it will work well with some pressure. Inexpensive surplus blowers can be found easily. Just be sure to cable your new contraption carefully if it uses line voltage.

http://www.herbach.com/

http://www.sciplus.com/

Here is a link that might be useful: surplus

    Bookmark   January 27, 2011 at 8:49PM
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joed

A vacuum sucking air out will have the same effect as a blower blowing air in.

    Bookmark   January 28, 2011 at 8:11AM
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ionized_gw

That is a very good point that opens some good design alternatives. The ornaments and "contraption" must be able to withstand the vacuum as opposed to pressure.

Is the air going into these ornaments filtered to keep dust out?

    Bookmark   January 28, 2011 at 1:37PM
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