RECIPE: Organic or Vegetarian would live healthier?

gardengardengardengaJanuary 4, 2004

Just wondering how other people view organic vs vegetarian vs mainstream

as a life style...

Iam trying to eat organic but DH is cheating every chance he can and the family is not supportive unless I cook and prepare the meals... am I too _________?

I know that I feel better when I am responsible and choose foods that are healthy, anyone else out there like me?

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sally2_gw

I don't understand. Your husband is going out to buy chemically raised veggies instead of the organic? Or are you talking about him sneaking meat while you are trying to get the family to be vegetarian? I don't see it as organic vs vegetarian. Organic is always better, especially with meat products, but it's definately harder on the pocketbook. As far as what is healthiest, that's pretty complex, also. If you want to be vegetarian for health reasons, that's great, but there are actually some animal food sources, such as fish, that's considered very healthy. One can also eat a very unhealthy vegetarian diet, full of refined carbohydrates and trans-fatty acids. I, personally, don't like killing, and therefore don't eat anything that has a mother.

My husband is not vegetarian, and I'm not going to bug him about what he eats. At the same tim, he is very patient and supportive of me and my daughter being vegetarian. We rarely have meat in the house, but he occasionally does buy and fix himself a meat dish. He knows I won't do it for him. I don't consider this "cheating." I consider it a formula for a good marriage. Live and let live. Grow and buy organic as much as you can. Eat what you like, and work in a positive way with your husband. If he want's to eat junk food now and then, let him. Try and introduce him to tasty, vegetarian entrees, side dishes, whatever, without making a big deal about it. If it tastes good, I bet he'll eat it, and won't care if it's vegetarian or not; organic or not.

Sally

    Bookmark   January 9, 2004 at 9:14AM
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gardengardengardenga

Actually Iam a recovering vegetarian...I eat meat that is wild or organic...or at someone's home ( as not to hurt feelings) or restraunt (traveling), but I feel that I am just appeased with my beliefs and that even though my family understands the issues I have with concerns of engineered foods,the added preservatives, the toxic food packaging,added antibiotics, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and the general sprays used in warehouses to maintain pest and rodent controls that gets applied to food storage area all in the interest of making more money and not in regards to our health and well being.

I just wish that the consumer world were taught that the food supply is not pure and that it could be!

I cringe when I hear that my husband took out my kids and fed them products that I have been trying to keep them from the addiction to. He tells me he tries,( I think he is 1000 X better than 5 years ago) but I think that he likes the disney dad syndrom. I understand the fun of watching a child eat a treat that mainstreamers crave.

I was just looking for some hope or support as not to give up or in, my kids think I am no fun, my husband seems to try and the people I work with can't seem to get the idea that I as the owner only want organic or healthy foods available for sale for customers or employees...the day the soda machine were sent away there were mouths hung open and pleads to keep it...

why is being organic so difficult to be?

I think that I will just grumble when my children are spoilt and try and to prepare as much food for my family as I can...

I know there are far more worries int he world to concern about...stuck trying to do the right thing and feeling like Iam depriving my family,friends, employees of simple pleasures.

I believe that pure good food is essential and that there will be great crisises in the future if we lose the ability to be responsible for our own food.

Blah blah blah the same thing over and over it seems.
I'll just resort to doing my own thing, Keep nagging my family to do what is best and understand why,I'll drink some dandelion tea, fry up some french fries from the potatoes I Grew this summer in grape seed oil and use the organic ketchup to dip them in:O)

    Bookmark   January 10, 2004 at 12:02AM
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sally2_gw

Believe it or not, your kids will probably eventually embrace the kind of food you are trying to get them to eat, especially if you don't make a huge deal about it. They naturally will rebel in some areas, and food is one of the areas that rebelling isn't so bad, unless they develope eating disorders, but that's a whole 'nother issue. Anyway, I have three grown/almost grown kids. Most of what I've tried to teach them has miraculously rubbed off. I never made a big issue trying to get them to eat what they don't like, because I wouldn't want to eat something I don't like, either. My 2 sons like just about everything, but my daughter is quite finicky. She's one of those super tasters. However, she is vegetarian, has become quite a good cook, and is definately trying to eat nutriciously, even though she is a sweetaholic. Have confidence in yourself and your kids. Kids are actually quite resilient.

Sally

    Bookmark   January 10, 2004 at 9:39AM
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lpinkmountain

Gardengardengarden it is hard. Change happens slowly. I've been a vegetarian who tried to eat healthy and organic starting in 1978. If you get discouraged, stop and think about how it was back then--you could only buy healthy food in weird little stores in shady neighborhoods! :-) Now I can get whole grain stuff, soymilk, etc. in almost any grocery store. And organic too, in most urban areas. And lots of restaurants have vegetarian options now, back then NONE did. I can't tell you how many grilled cheese sandwiches I ate back in those days, and now I even find veggie burgers in some diners. I understand about resistance, I find it in my own family, from folks who are now wracked with colon problems, heart disease and diabetes. It's like living with alcoholics. But you can't let it get to you and destroy your positive attitude. Sally gives good advice. Just stick to your guns in a quiet and upbeat way, don't get discouraged. Always allow your hubby and family back in the fold, don't make them feel guilty for backsliding, they will come around in their own time when they are ready. And if not, that is THEIR problem I'm afraid! You can only control your own life in the end, and lead by gentle example. This battle is not just about food, it has a spiritual side, and folks have to come to deeper understandings on their own terms, you cannot shove this down their throats. But don't underestimate the power of genuine compassion.

    Bookmark   January 10, 2004 at 11:47AM
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teri2

Very eloquent, lpink.

"Weird little stores in shady neighborhoods." LOL! I remember them! Funny you brought that up - just yesterday, in a mainstream grocery store, I noticed an entire case of soy dairy products right next to the animal dairy products. Right there in prime grocery real estate! It did cross my mind that times sure have changed for the better.

garden - good luck with your efforts. But don't let it become a huge issue. I think it's very like the current TV commercial about teenage smoking - point being that kids are listening even when they don't appear to be.

Teri

    Bookmark   January 12, 2004 at 4:19PM
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lpinkmountain

I actually still frequent those stores! :-)

    Bookmark   January 17, 2004 at 10:43PM
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nancyinmich

DH was veg long before I met him. Imagine my surprize when he rejected every veg meal in my repertoire! He doesn't eat dairy - except some fat free! Well, it is eight years next month that we have been married. I like much of his food just fine. But I gained about 85 lbs on it (plus my junk food - anything with salt or chocolate). So now I am eating low carb, low fat meat (8 oz a day) and all the veggies I want. He has not minded me cooking my food. He has never bullied me, suggested I not eat something, or even rolled his eyes at my food choices. He sits and watches me eat my diet food four days a week and eat sweets part of the other three. I think I surprize him when I still manage to lose something at the end of the week! But now I am back down 85 lbs and need to lose 50 or 60 more. I will do it slowly.

What makes it work is respect. Bill does not preach, he is very quiet about his food choices. At home he would never have white bread (or even wheat pasta) and today at a gathering of old college friends, he really had to eat a white bread cheese sandwich and sour cream dip or starve, as he did not bring anything with him and he did not want to "embarrass" the hosts by bringing his own lunchmeats (soy, of course). We discussed whether the hosts would feel worse that he brought his own food to lunch, or watching him eat nothing but blue corn chips and salad and spinach dip. He opted for the suffering in silence with the munchies (thank goodness there was no bacon in the dip!).

If someone asks him why he has chosen to be mostly vegan (my cheesecake and my friend's apple pie with butter are the exceptions) he will say that it is both health and philosophy. His dad had open heart surgery for clogged arteries and Bill also belieives that if we all ate veg, we could feed the world many times over. But he never preaches or engages in someone's attempt to argue. He is happy and healthy. When he is in a social setting he will eat the best he can there, but never cross over to eating meat (just some dairy). He brings an entre' to some family gatherings, or we make veg versions of some main dishes for him. He would never expect hosts to go out of their way to make sure he can eat, as these are his own choices, not theirs.

And he'll sit and watch me eat something totally bad for me without a word. He knows that I know better. He knows that harping on me will not help me do better, only hurt our relationship. He really is a saint!

Give your kids the food you want them to have. Know that once they are out of your sight they will try to eat like their friends, as being a kid means that different is BAD. DH will not give up his favorite foods, but will get good food from you at home. You are greatly influencing their diet and their tastes. Your good food will register with them at some level and they may make better choices because you have helped them cultivate a taste for good food. That is the only thing we can really do for our families, give them a good base to start from.

Negativitiy is probably as toxic to them as some of the pesticides you are trying to help them avoid. What happens outside of your sight is their business. Don't argue about it, it only makes it a bigger issue. You can best teach by example and by teaching them to appreciate your good choices at home.

    Bookmark   February 14, 2004 at 11:59PM
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gardengardengardenga

Its been awhile since I checked this thread...
thank you (if you ever see this thread again!) for your support and warm comments.

It has been about 6 months...

I had to really stay to my beliefs when my 12 year old mainstreaming niece came to visit for the summer! Wow, talk about brainwashed and addicted eating habits. She came from a large city in the mid-west. She loves the quick fast food places and was horrified to hear that our family would not be visiting these places!

SHe will be leaving next week, and for the summer she was here, we ate organic foods everyday and she actually said that she liked it better. That the food filled her up quicker and left her more satisfied! Yeahhhh! A great success, however I do know that as soon as she gets back to her other world that she will most likely regress. I do know that the seed of awareness has been planted and she understands why I choose to eat the way I do. We have what ever we like, it just doesnt have chemicals and poisons in it! Or not to our knowledge.

    Bookmark   July 25, 2004 at 10:28PM
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nancyinmich

Way to go!

I do check in here occasionally, it is hard to understand why this forum gets so little traffic. Are there no vegetarians at THS, or are they all so settled into their lifestlye that they see no need to discuss things?
Nancy

    Bookmark   July 31, 2004 at 1:02PM
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sunnyco

Nancy, I just keep forgetting about it. Although I am not really a vegetarian, I am close to it and if it were not for certain condiments (fish sauce) and the fact that my family members are not (bites of other things keep finding their way into my mouth) I would be.

I need to check back more often.

sunny

    Bookmark   August 2, 2004 at 6:20PM
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amar

Hello
I think being vegitarian is very good for your health if you eat properly. You must get your protein from many sources. Legumes are one of the best sources of proteins but I have learned that proteins in legumes does not contain all the amino acids you need. Corn contains a good protein value as well and legumes and corn provide all but one needed amino which I beleive is in peanuts and some other foods. I learned this from my organic chemistry teacher.

As a vegitarian I eat many fruits and vegetables and of course legumes, corn, and peanuts and many other protein sources. I've heard grain amaranth is great as well.

I also drink fresh fruit juice made from different fruits. I use apple, pear, orange, grapes, berries, pineapples, watermelon(outstanding juice), melons, and many other fruits. I usually do a combination of two or three of these. These juices are very good and they are great for your health. Your kids may not object to this (I couldn't). I have not been sick since I started drinking juice. It is even better if you can juice other things like tomato, spinach, celery, and other greens. The kids may not like it but you might be able to sneak a little spinach into some fruit juice.

As far as organic is concerned I try to do it but it is too expensive and availablity is limited. But whatever I can buy organic I try to do so and if you can't then at least you tried. Organic foods are definately better not only for you but for the enviornment. If we eat more organic foods that means more will be grown in a manner that is usually least harmful to the enviornment.

Hope this helps.

Amar

    Bookmark   November 9, 2004 at 10:58PM
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starraffy

I do juicing of fruits and vegetables like kale carrots tomatoes and fruits such as apple, pear, orange, grapes, berries, pineapples, watermelon etc.. it helps me lose weight and maintain my healthy lifestyle. But curious about these organic foods and its benefits too.

    Bookmark   February 18, 2014 at 12:19PM
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