Tiny House Forum?

angiepangieJuly 12, 2013

I like this forum- but I sometimes think that we could use a tiny house forum. There are allot of people living in 75sq ft homes, 500 Sq ft homes- It would be neat to have a forum for them since they really don't fit in here.

I know that this forum is for smaller homes- under 2,000 sq feet. I guess it is just me, but even 1500 sq feet seems huge compared to some of the tiny houses out there.

Please see the link below to see what I am talking about

http://tinyhouseswoon.com/

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marti8a

I know a lot of people have posted plans and websites for tiny houses before, but I don't recall anyone who actually lives in a tiny house. At least not anyone who is a regular poster. Sometimes the owners of tiny homes have followed the link from their website here and posted on the thread that was started.

So I guess what I'm saying is I don't know if there are enough people who have tiny homes to make a separate forum popular. But you can certainly run it by GW. What do I know?

    Bookmark   July 13, 2013 at 10:48PM
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Iowacommute

I would love a tiny home, but DH doesn't think it would e fair to our DD.

I do really love the site Tiny House Talk that I linked below. There are sometimes several new posts about tiny houses everyday. Sometimes the homes are on wheels, but lately they have shown more with actual foundations and stairs.

Here is a link that might be useful: Tiny House Talk

    Bookmark   July 13, 2013 at 11:12PM
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dedtired

I know people in Manhattan who live in spaces as small as those houses. My friend just sold her 650 sq ft apt for $600,000.

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 2:16PM
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lavender_lass

Some of those look like playhouses. They're really cute, but I can't imagine having a dining space for more than two people. Are they like a studio apartment with a bath? They look like they might work for a weekend cabin, maybe?

    Bookmark   July 20, 2013 at 10:02PM
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mama goose_gw zn6OH

Thank you for that link--I've spent way too much time looking at all the cute little houses. I think a tiny house can be a good interim solution for a single person, or a couple who get along really well, but I can't imagine living in one long term, or with a family. And even though I joked about running away and living in a gypsy caravan, I can't imagine living a nomadic life.

I want a gypsy wagon, to use for a playhouse or extra guest room. Then I'll have a smaller home and a tiny home. :)

    Bookmark   July 23, 2013 at 12:54PM
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eclecticcottage

I agree, when I saw "smaller houses" I was thinking under 1000 sq ft. 2000 sq ft is a big house to me. Of course, our previous home was about 900 sq ft and this one is just under 700 (like 696, which sounds weird and I prefer to round to 700, lol). Even at that size, it doesn't really feel small, the only thing is that it's only a one bedroom (unless we made a loft or something). Before we bought it we were looking at one that was 500 and something (I can't remember, maybe 570?). That was completely gutted (no walls) so it was hard to get a sense of "will this seem small"-but we were going to have a bedroom and bath then the kitchen/livingroom open to each other so I don't think it would have. We actually know the people that bought it so it will be interesting to see how they configure it when they get around to putting up walls.

I think below 500 sq ft starts to get small, if you don't want to go the "studio" route instead of a seperate bedroom. We have a 120 sq ft shed and I can't imagine living in there, I can downsize a lot, but I must have an actual bathroom. I draw the line at an outhouse or something like that, lol. I could probably make it work with 300 or so sq ft and a loft "bedroom".

    Bookmark   July 29, 2013 at 9:18AM
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Bob Henry

"but I don't recall anyone who actually lives in a tiny house. At least not anyone who is a regular poster".


I am and I do.

in fact I have two.

[http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f\=48&t\=47804](http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=47804)

[http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f\=48&t\=57551](http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=57551)
    Bookmark   February 9, 2015 at 11:08AM
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lavender_lass

You have two? Is one too tiny? Sorry, I couldn't resist :)

Seriously...does anyone live in a tiny house (full time) in a cold climate? I can see a tiny house in a warm climate, where you can take advantage of outdoor living space. With our cold winters, I think it would be extreme cabin fever!

1 Like    Bookmark   February 11, 2015 at 5:12PM
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Iowacommute

I could see a tiny house in a northern climate especially around a ski community. I have seen them on the tiny house sites but certainly it seems like a better deal if youre in a more temperate climate.

We're still thinking about building 600 to 800 sqft for the three of us.

1 Like    Bookmark   February 11, 2015 at 5:46PM
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Bob Henry

My house in a house is 5oo sq ft and is heated with a vent free propane fireplace. This heating season I have gone thru $270.00 in propane with about 2 months to go. I have been caretaking my sister after a heart attack for almost 30 days now so the little house has not been occupied or heated. Despite actual temps of -11 the bottled water in the kitchen setting out on the cold cement floor has not frozen. It amazed me too! I have R 18 in the walls and R 27 in the roof. The insulation is the key. There are a lot of details I need to attend to for next season such as weather stripping the entry door. A better threshold for the same door.( right now a skinny cat could slide under) The pantry walls and my closet wall has yet to be insulated and a couple odd runs in the ceiling remain empty. The main walls are all insulated and drywalled but the ceiling still needs drywall installed. I can close off the living room by hanging a blanket in the archway and get the temp to 80+ in about 40 minutes from arrival. This residence is stealth and illegal in the county it is in but it has been home since May 1st of 2014.

http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=47804

The little caboose is even better insulated and being 1/4 the size it will be super easy to heat. I have yet to live in the caboose as it is embroiled in a zoning battle with the city.

http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=5755

    Bookmark   February 12, 2015 at 4:30AM
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    Bookmark   February 12, 2015 at 8:05AM
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mama goose_gw zn6OH

That took a while to load, and I didn't read every page, but it's very entertaining. Except for the fight with the city, you're living my dream of converting an old camping trailer to a guest house/play house for my grandson. I would park it beside the barn, overlooking a pond, not use it on the open road. I want a hippie/gypsy wagon style, so I search craigslist ads, and make plans.

(I know, moccasinlanding, I'm still thinking about the buttery, too.) ;)

2 Likes    Bookmark   February 12, 2015 at 10:43AM
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Moccasin

Many folks of retirement age opting out of larger homes with maintenance are going the gypsy route with a motorhome, RV, etc. Or some on boats, but actually boats are high maintenance and need physically able crews. Sometimes I'd find it described as "alternate lifestyles," but for myself it was years ago that I was interested in it. I like to look at the living spaces currently identified as tiny homes, there are some very creative accommodations.

I remember when I sold my houseboat after living on it 10 years, and bought the brick cottage (on a bayou in Mobile) which I named MoccasinLanding. I rattled around in the house like a beebee in a wash pot for a long time. I had no furniture for a normal house, just light weight wicker chairs. Truly a regular built house wastes a LOT of space which a shipwright could turn into storage or multipurpose features. Old Key West, for instance, had many of the original homes built by shipwrights, and some materials came from shipwreck salvages.

    Bookmark   February 26, 2015 at 9:41AM
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