RE: Advice - Using Glycerin instead of lye?

tina_2March 21, 2006

Hi all . Does anyone know - if I can use glycerin instead of lye for this recipe? I would really, like to make a big batch of this! I am relatively new to soapmaking.

I prefer, glycerin soap recipes.

Olive 35%

Palm 35%

Coconut 20%

Shea Butter 10%

A nearly 2 pound batch with a 5% super fat and full water would be:

palm 7 oz

coconut 4 oz

olive oil 7 oz

shea 2 oz

fo/eo 1.2 oz

lye 2.79oz

water 6.85oz

This makes a really nice hard bar that lathers well!

Can anyone tell me? Please email me.

Thank you, all. Tina_2

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terri_pacnw

No, I don't think so.
You either make Cold Process soaps with lye, fats and oils. Or you make Melt and Pour soaps with Glycerin bases.

You can add some extra fats and oils to M&P soaps though.

Melt and Pour

Here is a link that might be useful: Soap Ingredients

    Bookmark   March 21, 2006 at 4:10PM
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tina_2

Hi - Thanks for responding - below is the reason for my question. Tell me, what you think? Thanks -Tina_2

Coconut & Olive Soap
This recipe has been revised by Christin Ocasio, Owner, Wyndham Soapworks. See her notes in sidebar.

1 cup olive oil
1 cup coconut oil
1 cup melted tallow (animal fat)
2 tbsp lye (heaping) (*NOTE)
1/2 cup cold soft water
has been changed to:

8 oz weight olive oil
8 oz weight coconut oil
8 oz weight rendered tallow
3.49 oz weight sodium hydroxide (pure lye) Red Devil brand 100% lye (*NOTE)scroll to bottom.
9 fluid oz water
While wearing safety goggles and neoprene gloves, combine solid lye and liquid, stir well. Set aside and allow to cool (100° F to 125° F). This is best done outside while you are standing upwind.
Combine oils and heat gently. Once the fats and oils are melted allow the temperature to drop to 100° F to 125° F.

Combine lye solution and melted oils. Be careful not to splash while combining the mixtures. Stir until the mixture traces. If tracing takes more than 15 minutes, which it often does, stir for the first 15 minutes, then stir for 5 minutes at 15 minute intervals. Tracing looks like a slightly thickened custard, not instant pudding but a cooked custard. It will support a drop, or your stir marks for several seconds. Once tracing occurs...

Pour raw soap into your prepared molds. After a few days the soap can be turned out of the mold. If the soap is very soft, allow it to cure for a few days to firm the outside.

Cut soap into bars and set the bars out to cure and dry. This will allow the bar to firm and finish saponification. Place the bars on something that will allow them to breathe.

Note: If you don't want to mess with tallow and lye, you can substitute shavings from any white unscented soap

    Bookmark   March 21, 2006 at 4:43PM
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basilmom

Lye + fat + water = soap. You cannot get around that. There is NO substitution for the chemical compound of soap. NONE. There is no such thing as "glycerin soap". Glycerin is a byproduct of the soap making process - so, by making soap (with LYE, because there is no other way) you create soap filled with glycerin, naturally. "Glycerin soap" is a marketing misnomer.

Melt and pour "soap" is actually a detergent, and not a soap at all. It is not made with lye, so it is not soap. Detregents are made with phosphates which are carcenogenic (cancer causing). There is no way around that either.

I just wanted to clear these things up -- I get rather frustrated with the common confusion about what soap really is, and what "glycerin soap" really isn't. Soap is much better for your skin, and the environment than detergent.

There is no reason to be afraid of using lye to make soap.

    Bookmark   March 23, 2006 at 10:52AM
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terri_pacnw

The note sounds like Rebatching.
Where you take a made soap add stuff to it and create a "new" soap.

    Bookmark   March 23, 2006 at 4:43PM
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greenfaerie

not all melt and pour is a detergent, there are many bases that are great and are soap.

    Bookmark   June 14, 2006 at 7:57AM
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