Protecting window sills from dogs?

catherinetDecember 9, 2005

Hi all,

Our dog has taken to putting her paws up on the oak windowsills, and getting hysterical when she sees a bird, coon, cat, etc. and starts moving around and scratching the sills. Any fairly aesthetically pleasing ways of protecting the sills? I'm thinking on the ones that don't show much, using some strips of shelf-liner....maybe the faux wood grain. I would probably have to change it fairly often, but that's okay. Any better ideas?

Thanks for your help.

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davidandkasie

get a shock collar and zap the dog every time she goes near the window, it won't take long to stop.

but seriously, i wish i knew. our labs do the same thing, except they also get the window frame scratched as much as 4 ft up! i HAVE considered the option i gave you, except with my luck the durn dogs would jump through the window!

the best deterrent i have found so far is a paddle. when one of them goes toward a window, i slap the paddle on the side of my recliner, the noise makes them stop. lately, all i have to do is grab the paddle and they move away from the window. the problem is tha tthis only works if we are in the room.

    Bookmark   December 9, 2005 at 11:15PM
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clt3

I bought some heavy plastic from the fabric store (like you would put over a table cloth) . Opened the window, stuck the strips of plastic in, and then closed the window. Worked like a charm. Unattractive, but cheap and easy to replace.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2005 at 7:47AM
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westernmainer

I too was also thinking of plastic.
Maybe plexiglass cut to fit the sill.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2005 at 11:45AM
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chisue

Mousetraps on the ledge might train the dog to stay away.
Or evil smelling DogBeGone or whatever they call it. You could saturate some material with the liquid and put small dishes of it on the sill. I think training the dog is going to be easiest. Another thought: Our dog has "his" chair beside a front window. He leaps up in the chair to regulate the comings and goings of arch enemies...like squirrels and the neighbor's cat.

    Bookmark   December 10, 2005 at 6:10PM
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live_wire_oak

Crate training when you are not home will solve that issue, and then direct supervision and training when you are at home. Treat your dog as you would a toddler. IF you can't physically keep an eye on her and monitor her behavior to shape it, then put her in her crate until you are through preparing dinner, vacuuming, etc. Make sure you also make room in your schedule for some structured physical exercise, even just walks. Treat every encounter as a learning opportunity that you can teach your dog. What you're doing right now is accepting unacceptible behavior, and that does not bode well for the future. The #1 reason dogs are surrendered to shelters is behavior issues that the owner didn't correct. Destroying the home is the #1 behavior issue listed for surrender, closely followed by digging and then jumping. All are fully correctible issues with enough monitoring and training. I'm sure you love your dog. Most people do. Love her enough to train her to behave correctly. If you need help with resources on how to do this, contact your local Humane Society for pamplets or recommendations for a trainer.

    Bookmark   December 11, 2005 at 9:36AM
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catherinet

Thanks for all your suggestions everyone!

    Bookmark   December 11, 2005 at 10:35AM
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mike_in_kc

You might want to try a Scat Mat. Essentially, it's a vinyl mat that's electrically wired to send a low voltage shock when a cat or dog steps on it. We bought one several years ago to train our cat to stay off areas like the dining room table, kitchen counters, etc. It had a dial that let you adjust the amount of current since larger pets need more stimulation to get the idea. It worked like a charm-- The first time our cat stepped up on the mat, nothing happened so we dialed it up a bit more and it didn't take long for her to decide the table was not a good place for her to be.

You can read about it at http://www.scatmat.com/Products/ScatMat/ and find them at places like Petsmart or Petco.

    Bookmark   December 11, 2005 at 4:26PM
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catherinet

Thanks Mike!

    Bookmark   December 11, 2005 at 8:35PM
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chisue

Hey, Mike, I'm glad to know about the Scat Mat, too! Thank you.

    Bookmark   December 12, 2005 at 12:11PM
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