powersave 1200

maria_bebopAugust 5, 2008

I found this website about this add-on to your circuit breaker panel that's supposed to save electricity. I'm seriously considering buying it. Anyone familiar with it? I'd hate to waste 300 bucks. Here's the site:

http://www.power-save1200.com/1200.html

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dchall_san_antonio

I have a mini version on my refrigerator. After four years of running it, if it does anything I cannot tell. At least the fridge is still working.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 2:07AM
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maria_bebop

dchall, is it like a surge protector? I don't know how this works, but I'll have to get an electrician to install it. My electric bill is so high now, I'm tempted to try anything.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 9:00AM
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rileysmom17

If you want to save electricity, do it directly by identifying sources of "leak" or "trickle" and deal with them directly. These may be lifestyle issues like keeping your house at 70 degrees all summer, they may be structural issues like having a poorly insulated house with leaky doors and windows (something that can be fixed with caulk or spray foam occasionally), they may be carelessness issues like keeping lots of electronic gadgets plugged in and turned on when not in use.

The renewable energy forum has a lot of good tips because you can't leak, trickle or waste when you are living on solar panels. I would be very concerned about anything that was affecting electrical conduction at the level of the circuit breaker. Overheating and burning down your house are issues that come to mind.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 9:31AM
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Chemocurl zn5b/6a Indiana

If you want to save electricity, do it directly by identifying sources of "leak" or "trickle" and deal with them directly.
Rileysmom is right. There are likely many ways to conserve some electricity. Possibly if you can tell us a bit about your home, and its occupants, we can come up with some ideas. Reading old posts here should also produce some things to think about.

I have all my computer stuff on a protected power strip. (Computer CPU, monitor, speakers, router, printer) When I turn off the computer for the night, I then shut off the power strip too.

I also have my entertainment center on a similar power strip and fixed it handy to reach to shut off. When I turn it off, it disconnects the TV, stereo, VCR, DVD player, all of which may (or may not) rob a little electricity when left on though not in use. Any waste there is too much (IMHO).

Sue

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 11:48AM
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maria_bebop

Thank you for your help. It's my grown son and myself in the house. It's a small ranch and we've had it insulated and just got new windows and fiberglass exterior doors. I think the main thing using electricity are the 2 air conditioners. We couldn't fit window ones in the windows so we bought 2 portable ones. I don't think they are as energy efficient.

I think that's a good idea about using power strips and shutting everything off at once. Also I've been trying to use the dryer less. I wonder how much that thing uses.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 12:49PM
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Chemocurl zn5b/6a Indiana

We couldn't fit window ones in the windows so we bought 2 portable ones.

I suspect those may be the culprits. What brand and models did you get? I've been researching them a bit myself, to just cool down the bedroom well at night for sleeping. I am alone most of the time, and play outside (flower and veggie gardening) a lot during the day, so there is no need to keep the house cool then. I come in to cool down, get a beverage, and find a fan on me cools me down quickly. Soon I'm ready to take another hitch at it.

I have casement windows and thought of venting the portable unit to the (unfinished ) basement and then out a window.

Sue

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 4:46PM
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maria_bebop

Sue, we have had a difficult time with air conditioners. These replacement windows have a very narrow ledge for the air conditioner to sit on, and we couldn't get it to fit. Neither of us are very handy. So we bought one at costco and another one at a local store. The brands are Danby and Royal Sovereign. They cool well and are about as quiet or noisy (depending on how you look at it) as our old window ones. Setting them up was easy. We were able to put one in the basement window. But at 12,000 btu's each, I think they are costing me.

    Bookmark   August 6, 2008 at 8:01PM
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Chemocurl zn5b/6a Indiana

We were able to put one in the basement window.
So one is vented out the basement window...and where is the hot air exhaust from the other one going? There might be your problem.

Would closing off unused rooms be an option maybe for part of the time? I am inside today, just kicked on the AC, have the vents shut off and closed the doors on the 2 bedrooms and 2 baths...just leaving the ones in the liv/dining room and kitchen open.

These replacement windows have a very narrow ledge for the air conditioner to sit on, and we couldn't get it to fit. Neither of us are very handy.
Might you have a relative or friend who is handy? My 'guess' is that there is probably a half way easy way to make it work, unlike my casement style windows...sigh.

Sue

    Bookmark   August 7, 2008 at 1:43PM
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rileysmom17

Definitely go to the HVAC forum with this question, and provide the specific manufacturer names, model numbers, and other technical stats, plus your KWH energy use and square footage cooled. There are very quiet and very efficient "split systems" now available, made by companies you wouldn't expect (like Japanese car companies, I think). If your two systems cannot be returned you will have to do a cost calculation as to whether you would still be better off getting a new system(s) and trying to sell the current ones. The regulars on the HVAC forum are super-geeks of HVAC and love a challenge.

    Bookmark   August 7, 2008 at 3:51PM
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garymunson-2008

Check out this website regarding things that supposedly save electricity....

http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/

    Bookmark   August 17, 2008 at 5:55AM
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garymunson-2008

Devices like the 'powersave 1200' are devices that have some application in industrial settings where large motors run under different load conditions. It only works on motors. Think of a woodworking shop with a large table saw. The saw runs constantly. It's only under load while the wood is being cut. When it's unloaded (not cutting) is when those devices save power. That's the video demo you see on the site you mentioned....a bare motor with nothing attached. HOWEVER, in the home, there is never the same condition. All motors in your house run very close to rated load at all times. In this state, the device saves NO energy. Anyone pushing those items for home use is a scammer.

    Bookmark   August 17, 2008 at 6:15AM
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garymunson-2008

If you are in a hot climate and use a lot of A/C, check out this proven way to save $30-$50 a month on your power bill...

http://www.trevormartin.com/about.asp

http://www.turbotecproducts.com/EPhome.html

http://www.p2pays.org/ref/11/10104.pdf

    Bookmark   August 17, 2008 at 6:18AM
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davidandkasie

power factor correction does save money, BUT ONLY on commercial rate service. the POCO does not measure PF on residential service and therefore these devices do nothing for you.

    Bookmark   August 29, 2008 at 2:35PM
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lazy_gardens

http://www.physicsforums.com/archive/index.php/t-232734.html

Physicists say it's not going to work. and they are the ones who really understand it.

They point out that utility meters measure watt hours not KVA hours, so if the power factor is low, the meter doesn't see it. Correcting power factor in a residential application will save exactly zero dollars.

Don't bother unless you are using so much power that you have your own transmission lines

    Bookmark   February 10, 2012 at 4:59PM
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