Repair Baldwin Mortise and Lock Cylinder

Larry WassonJanuary 13, 2010

Had an earthquake here in Eureka California a few days ago and since then my Baldwin Barclay mortise lock has not functioned properly. Took it apart today to see if I could repair.

The lock cylinder had some broken springs. There are seven pin tumblers which I put back correctly, but it looks like only four work the key. Found only 3 springs. Should there be seven and what is the best way to put it back together?

The mortise box had a couple of parts I think were broken. There was a small black spring loose in the box along with a small metal ball. I also think part of a spring is broken that operates the push buttons on the mortise. Is there a schematic for the Baldwin mortise?

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sierraeast

It might be tough to get replacement parts from baldwin, even if you had a schematic and parts list. You might try their website but i'd call around and ask for a locksmith familiar with baldwin and go from there.

We're building near lassen and currently live in the high desert in so.cal. The ground is always a shakin'!

    Bookmark   January 13, 2010 at 7:20PM
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Larry Wasson

Thanks Sierraeast. Lived in San Dimas, Covina, and Apple Valley before moving to Eureka.

    Bookmark   January 13, 2010 at 9:08PM
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lazypup

There should be two pins and a spring for each hole in the cylinder. The bottom pins must be equal to the cut depth of the key.

Take the cylinder to any locksmith and they can re-pin the cylinder to match your key in a few minutes.

You need not worry about waiting for OEM parts because your locksmith with have a complete universal set of pins in his LAB Pro pin kit.

    Bookmark   January 14, 2010 at 5:41AM
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Larry Wasson

Thanks Lazypup. There are seven holes in the cylinder and seven in the cylinder case. Found only seven pins. Four of them seem to operate the key and the other three all the same size probably go in the spring holes. There were only three springs and two of them look damaged. It is probably hard to hold the springs and pins in place in order to load the cylinder, so will take to a locksmith as you suggested.

    Bookmark   January 14, 2010 at 11:11AM
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lsst

I had to replace some non-working parts in my parent's Baldwin handleset.
I called Baldwin and had the replacement parts within a week free of charge.

    Bookmark   January 18, 2010 at 11:40PM
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lazypup

when pinning a lock they have a cylindrical tool called a "plug follower" that has the same outside diameter as the cylinder. They insert the plug follower into one end of the lock body then reach in from the opposite end and drop a spring and a top pin in a hole. The plug follower is slid forward to block the pin and spring in place and they continue working forward until all the springs and top pins are in place. The top pins are all the same size and they are cut square on both ends.

Next they pin the cylinder. Begin by inserting the key in the cylinder, then drop a "Bottom pin" in the first hole. Bottom pins have a point on one end, which fits into the groove on the key. The bottom pins are random length and they select the correct length so that when the pin is resting in the groove of the key the top end of the pin is flush with the outside diameter of the cylinder. When all the pins are in place all the tops of the bottom pins should be flush with the cylinder OD. creating what is called the "Shear line". The cylinder is then held tight against the end of the plug follower and slide into the cylinder.

    Bookmark   January 19, 2010 at 3:17PM
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sombreuil_mongrel

If it's a mortise lock it should have a threaded cylinder, which can be replaced. My nearby downtown hardware store has cylinders on the shelf.
Two reasons not to buy:
the new generic cylinder won't say Baldwin on it or have the custom finish (if any), and 2) there may be other doors keyed the same, an amenity which would be lost.
But a new cylinder is a very easy DIY task, and since you already have it out & apart, you have the skill set.
Casey

    Bookmark   January 20, 2010 at 10:05AM
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Larry Wasson

Took to a locksmith who charged me $55 to re-pin the cylinder and repair the mortise lock. Picked up both and the locksmith said the mortise needed a couple of parts to be ordered. Installed the mortise, but it worked backwards to the way it originally worked. Locking and unlocking from the outside instead of the inside.

Waited a week and asked the locksmith about the parts. Said he was having trouble locating and was not able to order from Baldwin. So I called Baldwin and they sent me the parts with a parts schematic at no charge. The parts to be replaced were highlighted on the schematic.

Decided to repair the mortise myself. Did so, and installed. Still worked backwards. So, called Baldwin again, and they had their mortise expert call me. He indicated the locksmith had installed one of the push buttons in upside down. Took the lock apart again, reversed the push button, and now everything works correctly.

    Bookmark   April 14, 2010 at 11:02AM
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