Insul-brite insulated batting for potholders

purrfectpeggyNovember 12, 2007

Is there a right or wrong side to this. That is, should the shiny side be facing out towards the fabric if you are using two layers or should the shiny side be facing each other? Doesn't state there is a right or wrong side on the instructions but thought I saw somewhere in the forum there was. Thanks.

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rosajoe_gw

When I made my potholders I used 2 layers because I wanted them to really protect my hand taking something from the oven.
I don't think it really matters, but I placed the shiny side towards the fabric.
Just remember that they should not be used in the microwave.
I include that message in the gift, I just never know about my family LOL.
Rosa

    Bookmark   November 12, 2007 at 6:35PM
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new2quilting

On their website they suggest:

*At least one layer of cotton batting is recommended with Insul~Bright when used as Oven Mitts or Pot Holders. Insul~Bright is heat-RESISTANT, NOT heat-proof.

Here is a link that might be useful: Warm company

    Bookmark   November 12, 2007 at 8:23PM
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maryliz

Here are previous threads on this forum with information about Insul-bright:

Making a hot padhref>

Anyone Here Make Potholders??href>

Need a Hot Iron Carrierhref>

    Bookmark   November 12, 2007 at 8:47PM
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judy333

Thanks for the previous threads links, maryliz!!! You made my life easier since I, too, am working on making my first potholder/hotpad.

    Bookmark   November 12, 2007 at 11:10PM
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cmc_97

Just another bit of data on this subject:

I just bought a potholder pattern that calls for Insul-brite. The instructions tell you to layer the potholder pieces with the shiny side of the Insul-bright facing "out", that is, facing what will be the HOT surfaces you will be holding. Then there is another layer of regular cotton batting against the fuzzy side on the Insul-brite - on the side that will be facing your hand.

HTH,
CMC

    Bookmark   November 13, 2007 at 11:16AM
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maryliz

I second CMC's description of the layering process:

1) quilter's cotton (Perhaps use a print to represent the "hand" side.)
2) one layer of regular batting
3) one layer of Insul-Bright, with the shiny side facing toward the "hot" side
4) quilter's cotton (Perhaps use a solid to represent the "hot" side.)

You don't want an extra layer of batting between the hot stuff and the Insul-Bright. You want the Insul-Bright to be able to reflect the heat back from where it came. Putting a layer of batting between the Insul-Bright and the heat would trap the heat inside the layers of the pot holder, so it would gradually build up heat. So that is why I recommend that you create a no-brainer way for people to know which side is for their hand. Perhaps a busy print on one side, and a solid color on the other might work.

Since the item is to be used around heat and flame, I'd avoid anything with synthetic fibers, which would melt and flare. 100% cotton will smolder for a long time, unless it is directly in the flame. Be sure that you use batting that says "100% cotton" right on the package. Warm & Natural is actually 12.5% polypropylene. That's the scrim that makes it possible to place quilting lines up to 10" apart.

Oh, and I think it is a good idea to tell the recipient to never put the item into the microwave. Sparks would fly!

    Bookmark   November 13, 2007 at 11:52AM
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nassongrad_nh

Avoiding synthetic fibers is quite impossible if you are using Insul-Bright. It is composed of polyester needlepunched through Mylar(a polyethylene). The 12.5% polypropylene content of Warm & Natural's scrim isn't going to make much difference one way or the other. Insul-Bright will melt and stick to skin if it catches on fire.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2007 at 3:32PM
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maryliz

Darn. That's what I figured. I guess you can't avoid synthetics. I guess you just have to be careful. I've never set a potholder on fire, but I can imagine how a potholder could end up where it doesn't belong.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2007 at 6:51PM
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D_Porter

Our grandmothers did not have Insul-Brite. What did they use? Several layers of regular batting? Is there a simpler way ("the old way") one can make potholders?

    Bookmark   November 9, 2012 at 12:10PM
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toolgranny

Sure - just several layers of batting to get it thick enough not to burn yourself. They used whatever was available, not synthetics which melt, usually cotton feed sacks.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2012 at 5:03PM
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nanajayne

LOL. I have made many............pot holders and have only once use an insolated material, not my favorite.
I just used 3 or 4 layers of reg. batting and have no problems. The REALLY old fashion way I used to use was to cut up old terry towels sew them together with an x, never had issue with that either.

    Bookmark   November 9, 2012 at 5:04PM
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buteau3rd

nanajayne....the terrycloth hint reminds me of watching a cooking show. The chefs just grab a dish towel, folded, and get the pans out of the oven...... works for me too!

    Bookmark   November 10, 2012 at 9:43AM
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