Binding Questions

magothyrivergirlNovember 12, 2010

I am in a hurry (what else is new?) - do you sew non mitered bindings on your quilts? Marcia Hohn - Quilterscache prefers double fold non mitered bindings.

I had never read this section before, her method looks fast. I am trying to get some kid's quilts finished and I am considering her method. I really like the look of mitered bindings hand sewn to the back, but heck, these are kids!

Another question- if I sew using her method (the 2 sides are finished before you attach the top & bottom) why couldn't I sew double fold, stitched onto the back, folded to the front and use a pretty blanket stitch on the front folded edge to stitch down?

(Please don't say its my quilt, I can do whatever I want :) I want your honest opinions please.

Here is a link that might be useful: Quilterscache Binding

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imrainey

I always do double bias mitered binding. That's the way I learned 40ish years ago. That's what I do. I tell myself that the stretch in bias may make the binding have a little give and last a bit longer. But, the truth is, I'm more comfortable doing it this way and I'd continue regardless. Besides, once you put two seams in the bias fabric you're working with you don't do another one until you connect the ends on the finished quilt.

As for mitering or sewing binding on each side, I don't see any time savings. I just fold for my miter and then do a continuous seam just stopping and lifting the needle to flip the corner. (I wish I could articulate that more clearly but I can't see it in my mind --- I just do it. ;>

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 12:41PM
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mary_c_gw

My very first quilt many years ago, I used that method. I really didn't like the bulk in the corners. I thought it looked clunky and amateurish.

I now always miter both straight grain and bias grain bindings, even if I'm going to use a blanket stitch to sew down the free edge.

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 12:56PM
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msmeow

I haven't tried the Quilter's Cache method, but it doesn't look like it would really be much faster than mitering the binding.

On some charity quilts I've sewn the binding to the back, then turned it to the front and stitched with a decorative stitch. It's faster than hand sewing (and probably stronger!) and I thought it looked nice.

Donna

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 1:40PM
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toolgranny

I use Sharon Schamber's method of tack with dots of glue and iron down first, then sew. I don't use bias unless curved edge. I think sewing to back first, mitering corners, and then sewing front down by machine would be fastest and look just great.

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 2:20PM
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ritaweeda

The quilt I just finished, I didn't even make a binding, I just used the backing folded over and stitched down on opposite sides, then folded over again to the front and used a decorative stitch on it. I know, it's amateurish, but I just didn't feel like messing with a binding on this one, it was just a lap quilt for someone who won't know the difference anyway. Pleeez don't call the quilt police on me!

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 3:14PM
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rosajoe_gw

I have tried her method and it was too much bulk in the corners for me and the corners were stiff.
I have also folded the backing to the front, glued in place, and stitched with a decorative stitch. IMO this is the fastest way.
I agree that I'm not going to hand stitch a binding that will be loved and washed A LOT!!
As long as the front looks good I'm happy lol!!!!!!!!!!!
Rosa

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 5:15PM
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magothyrivergirl

Thanks for keeping me from doing something (maybe dumb) that I would not be happy with the results!

I had not thought about the extra bulk in the corners, but my instincts said it wouldn't result in a finished quilt that would make me happy ~ so the traditional double fold method, with the exception of turning to the front and machine stitching on at least one quilt is what I will do.

I haven't tried using the glue, but I have watched her You tube - I need try it!

I have folded the back to the front and machine stitched on a few charity for kids quilts.

    Bookmark   November 12, 2010 at 7:32PM
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rosajoe_gw

Marsha you will love the glue!!!! A little goes a long way.
Rosa

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 12:47PM
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imrainey

Doesn't glue make the edges of the quilt stiff? How does it handle washing?

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 1:13PM
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magothyrivergirl

I am wondering what the glue does to the needle? I sew with a seam stick tape on boat canvas (on another machine) and I only use it when absolutely necessary, because it gums up the needle & then I get skipped stitches. Totally different circumstances and products, but just wondering....do you make sure the glue is out of the needle path?

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 1:33PM
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imrainey

Good question, magothyrivergirl. Velcro with the adhesive does the same thing and it's sooo hard to find Velcro without the adhesive anymore!

I think the difference is a tacky adhesive v a solid polymer. There's really only stick to the glue gun polymers when they're melted. As soon as they go back to room temp they're distinct solid objects again. That's why they can be stored touching in boxes. And that's why I doubt they'd gum up the machine like that infernal stuff they put on Velcro and possibly your sail material.

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 3:04PM
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imrainey

Adding, I still don't know that I feel good about glue guns and quilts, tho. Too much possibility to make the edges stiff and to not let one tiny area shrink and move with the fabric that surrounds it. But I'm not particularly troubled by gumming up the machine.

Now, a needle attempting to go through too thick a clump of it... ::shudder::

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 3:06PM
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rosajoe_gw

It works great with no probs and washes out completely! Sharon Schambler is an award winning quilter and teacher. How she experimented to find out about the glue I just don't know, but she recommends only using Elmers washable glue.
There are other expense basting glues sold at stores, but Elmers works just as well and it is cheap.
I use it on all of my quilts now and I love the way the mitered corners look great!!!!!!!!
The glue part is on about page 48 or so.
Rosa

Here is a link that might be useful: Elmer'sGlueBinding

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 3:37PM
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magothyrivergirl

Rosa, what tip do you use on the bottle of glue?
Thanks for the link - I was going to search for it again.

Imrainey, all Velcro adhesive is not the same. Some is super adhesive for outdoor application and also marine, not to mention the non"Velcro" brands. I agree it is difficult to sew.

Totally, not about binding, but instead Velcro - check out the link below.

Here is a link that might be useful: History of Velcro

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 4:42PM
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imrainey

Ah! So it's NOT basting with glue gun glue! Sounds like a MUCH better idea than the one I got messed up in my head! ;>

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 10:39PM
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imrainey

We have used that story of the discovery of Velcro often in my family as an illustration of what happens if you're 1) observant and 2) have the right attitude about what's a problem and what's an opportunity. ;>

BTW, I grew up running through fields all day and collecting grass cuts on my legs and those burrs on my socks. ;>

    Bookmark   November 13, 2010 at 10:42PM
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rosajoe_gw

Marsha, I just use the regular glue tip and spread it thin, use a pressing cloth to protect your iron, but I've never had a prob with it.
A bottle lasts forever. I live in the woods and the last time I went to Hobby Lobby I looked for the glue tips and didn't see any.
Rosa

    Bookmark   November 14, 2010 at 1:16PM
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