Adding 1/4' drywall to existing HEAVY knockdown texture walls

ms222May 15, 2012

So I have decided instead of paying thousands upon thousands for a professional to come in and skim coat and sand HEAVY knockdown texture walls, where itll be dusty all over etc for weeks, I will have someone add 1/4" drywall to the walls.

My main question is since they are adding 1/4" drywall wouldn't this cause issues with hiding some of the crown molding and baseboards? If I had to buy new crown molding and baseboards doesnt that costs thousands? Also how difficult would it be to re-do the outlets correctly when adding the 1/4" drywall?

The 1/4" drywall seems like the best solution because I have at least 800 linear feet of walls that have this insane knockdown texture on it that I want removed. I'm just concerned when this happens the molding will not look right. What can I do?

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Billl

All the molding will need to be removed, possibly recut, and reinstalled. Window and door jams will need to be addressed. Outlets will need be brought out to the new finished surface (they sell extenders, so that is pretty easy)

Definitely get quotes for both before making a decision.

    Bookmark   May 15, 2012 at 10:39AM
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TexasCatherder

Actually, you can skimcoat yourself - it is time consuming but not hard. (I had no DIY experience!) My entire house had this heavy knockdown texture on the walls. You get a box of Sheetrock drywall joint compound, take some out and mix some water into it to get it easier to spread, and then smooth it on with a big drywall "knife". Let it dry, sand it down, and then repeat. I used a vacuum attachment for a shop vac when doing the sanding and it really minimized the dust. I worked on it every evening and saved a ton of money. If you want, I can post links to the materials I used. I think my actual materials probably cost less than $100. (PS I am a woman "of a certain age" so if I can do this, anyone can!)

You may decide that you can do the bulk of the work and then have a painter come in and do the "finish" coat, which would still save quite a bit of money. The main thing is that if you hire someone to do the skim coating, it takes several trips because each coat has to dry and then be sanded, and it will probably take 3 coats (depending on the original texture.)

    Bookmark   May 18, 2012 at 11:16AM
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srjohnt

I would skim coat it, because you can probably work around all the moldings and outlets satisfacttorily. I just finished skim coating (two coats and sanding)a hall ceiling, and it looks great. To cover it with drywall, as mentioned, requires removing everything and reinstalling. None of this will be easy or quick, but the skim coat will be the best solution with the least pain, in my opinion.

    Bookmark   May 20, 2012 at 11:54AM
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Fori is not pleased

By the time you have it done, the texture will be trendy again. Is it really that offensive? :P

    Bookmark   May 20, 2012 at 12:04PM
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ms222

This is very offensive, and the problem is the lower 25% of the wall is actually completely smooth. So it doesnt look right to begin with

    Bookmark   May 26, 2012 at 1:34PM
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ndeedles

I had that in a house I owned once. Hated it and don't blame your for wanting to get rid of it. Skim coating will cause less work with the trim, etc. as was said above.

I had a guest once trip on the stairs, fall against the wall and took all the skin off his knee and elbow. Hateful stuff, that texture.

    Bookmark   June 7, 2012 at 1:01AM
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powermuffin

Yes, I don't think it will ever be trendy; it is too obtrusive. I used Magic Trowel to patch our beloved plaster walls and it was much easier than the normal dry wall trowels for me. Give it a shot; you can always go to plan B if you do not like the results.
Diane

    Bookmark   June 14, 2012 at 3:27PM
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