Do I prime before texture???

mike7300April 9, 2007

I am finishing my basement and have just completed mudding and taping my drywall. I would like to texture my walls but am curious on whether or not I should prime the bare drywall first. I know that I am suppose to prime after I texture, but should I make sure to prime first? Do professionals who spray on texture prime first too?

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igloochic

I've done my own texture and I've had a place sprayed on (texture) neither was done with primer prior to the texture. I've never heard of that actually.

    Bookmark   April 9, 2007 at 8:02PM
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Faron79

Hi Mike,
In a perfect world, they'd prime b4 AND after! Spray-tex would grip better then. Realistically, a rolled primecoat w/ a quality primer after spraying IS mandatory though!
"Builders-grade" primers aren't the greatest choice. There are MUCH better choices...stay near the top-end of a paint line for best hide and enamel hold-out.

Make darn sure you're rolling on two coats of paint after though...
Faron

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 12:59AM
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lynneblack

I've never heard of priming before texturing, I'm not sure why it would be desirable or necessary.

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 1:02AM
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brickeyee

Priming will make it easier to remove the stuff when you get tired of it catching dust...

    Bookmark   April 10, 2007 at 9:25AM
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mightyanvil

The drywall must always be primed before any paint or textured product is applied.

www.flexbon.com/probsdrywall.pdf

    Bookmark   April 15, 2007 at 7:30PM
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sierraeast

Try getting a painter to come in and prime,then have the drywaller come back to texture,and once again get the painter back out to paint. In most cases,this isn't going to happen. On new work,they texture right after mudding, many times before the mud joints have cured, causing problems with the paint ,(usually not primed),not adhereing properly.

Priming before texture gives the texture a better bond,but a second coat of primer should be applied over the texture as well,followed by two coats of finish.

If diy'ing, you have the luxury of doing it right by letting the mud joints cure,priming, texturing,etc. In contractor world, it isn't likely to happen.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 10:16AM
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sierraeast

You need to lightly sand the texture before finish.Just lightly "scratching" the surface will rid the texture,(or the majority), of the glaze that forms on cured texture so that it will accept the finish with a better bond.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 10:20AM
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randymeyer

Never primed before texturing when using joint compound based textures.
Never sanded texture.
Skipped primer and used (2) coats low-sheen finish many times.

Never had an issue - guessing well over 2 million square feet.

Either way is fine. Quality primer on top of texture would be better than below.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 3:36PM
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sierraeast

The reason for priming before texture,(rarely done these days),is that it allows the texture to adhere and dry evenly. When applied to a no primer surface, the texture reacts different on the mud joints vs. the paper surface of the wall board.This is crucial on knockdowns, because if you are inexperienced, you will be able to see all the mud joints after painting and different patterns of the knockdown, because the texture dries differently. When knocking down,the the texture over the mud joints will drag more than the papered surface. Another avenue instead of priming is to size the entire surface of the wall board with a light coat of mud,similar to a skim coat, only just wiping on and off. Feathering saves sanding.Not too many people i know do this, and as randymeyer stated, not doing it works for him,as long as the customer is happy with the outcome, that's all that matters. There is something to be said about longevity,however.

    Bookmark   April 16, 2007 at 4:30PM
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