Ugly rain gutter- suggestions?

jennsalApril 30, 2014

Just finished a major renovation that included adding a covered porch with columns. I came home to find this ugly gutter ruining the new porch. Do I need it? Suggestions? Thanks.

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rwiegand

You probably don't really need it. The only advantage is not having water running off the roof onto your entrance way, but that's a small roof so in light rain it won't be a torrent and in a gullywasher you'll be wet in any event.

    Bookmark   April 30, 2014 at 4:38PM
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HandyMac

There are other treatments, but keeping the water away from the side of the house(and foundation) is important.

See the link below for ideas.

Here is a link that might be useful: Rain chains

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 12:08AM
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beautybutdebtfree

The screens are ruining your windows, too, but I'll bet you've come to terms with them because they serve a valid function in protecting your house. ; )

Professional grade construction includes functional utilities that serve purposes. See the picture for a nice house just chock full of gutters and downspouts in plain view. The viewer doesn't normally focus on these utility elements and they become part of the background, IMHO. I think your gutter and downspout are only blaring to you because you didn't expect to see them.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 8:07AM
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DreamingoftheUP

The downspout should come down on the opposite end, along the house and terminate in a PVC drain that goes under the walk and comes up in the lawn. Unfortunately, the gutter routing should have been thought through when the project was designed. Attaching them to the column, is bad enough; facing the approach to the entrance makes it even worse.

EDIT - on second thought, better to always get the water away from the house as far as possible; pitching the gutter towards the house not a good idea.

The picture below with the gutter attached to the column on the right doesn't look so bad (still wouldn't like it, though). Right by the front door seems to stick out more, plus the color difference. Maybe scan pictures on Houzz to see what other people have done?

This post was edited by DreamingoftheUP on Thu, May 1, 14 at 8:59

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 8:10AM
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beautybutdebtfree

Here's an example closer to your setup, with the downspout coursing near a porch column.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 8:18AM
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graywings123

Painting the downspout the same color as what it is in front of will help disguise it - off-white to match the column and then a gray tone to match the stones.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 8:51AM
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jennsal

Thanks for the advice. The builder thought that we could take off the downspout and put a small elbow piece on the gutter to shoot the water away from the house. Hopefully that looks better and does the job. It's only a small roof area that won't collect much snow/rain.
My next option is a rain chain. Thanks for that suggestion, handymac.

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 2:43PM
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jennsal

Here's the new gutter

    Bookmark   May 1, 2014 at 4:16PM
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DreamingoftheUP

That certainly looks much better, but what will you be doing in the area below where the plywood is? You don't want splash-up on to the stone.

    Bookmark   May 2, 2014 at 8:02AM
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jadie88

Yeah, the comments that didn't see it as a problem were odd to me. It's one thing to have a downspout along the corner of a porch, but this is such a prominent place along the front walk. I would have had the "what were you thinking?" talk with the builder, too. Looks better now, and if runoff is a problem, a rain chain would be much less intrusive.

    Bookmark   May 2, 2014 at 8:14AM
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jennsal

I plan on planting some shrubs and mulching the area, hoping that will prevent splashing back onto the stone.

    Bookmark   May 2, 2014 at 8:55AM
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annzgw

IMO, the 'what were they thinking' applies to what you now have. Your builder should know better than to offer that as a solution since water 'shooting off' is going to create more of a headache than the downspout you had.
Landscaping and painting the lower portion of the downspout is the better solution......or a rain chain that empties into an area of gravel. Personally, I'd have a drain buried so that the runoff is carried out into the lawn and away from the house.

This post was edited by annz on Sun, May 4, 14 at 1:24

    Bookmark   May 3, 2014 at 10:48PM
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worthy

Shooting the water off works fine on our porch, as the runoff streams directly onto mature and perpetually thirsty evergreens.

The second floor drop is the more problematic one. There's too much roof to drain from just that one downspout and the concentrated flow on the shingles will wear them out prematurely and likely create an ugly discolouration.

There was clearly inadequate thought given to the trough and downspout system. Not surprising. I've seen 60 foot lengths of eavestrough "professionally" installed absolutely level. Real useful.

    Bookmark   May 4, 2014 at 3:03AM
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worthy

Shooting the water off works fine on our porch, as the runoff streams directly onto mature and perpetually thirsty evergreens.

The second floor drop is the more problematic one. There's too much roof to drain from just that one downspout and the concentrated flow on the shingles will wear them out prematurely and likely create an ugly discolouration.

There was clearly inadequate thought given to the trough and downspout system. Not surprising. I've seen 60 foot lengths of eavestrough "professionally" installed absolutely level. Real useful.

    Bookmark   May 4, 2014 at 3:05AM
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enduring

What Worthy says about the second floor spout is really a concern. That is a lot of roof to be handled by that one small spout. It looks like it will overflow onto your foundation with heavy rain events and if the gutters aren't spotlessly cleaned it will overflow onto the foundation with light to moderate rain events. I know, we have a terrible time keeping our gutters free from litter. In our old house, if we can't keep the rain from the foundation, our basement gets wet. Not a good thing to get the soils wet at the foundation even if it doesn't seep in. The soils will move with shrink swell action and be hard on the concrete.

    Bookmark   May 4, 2014 at 10:30AM
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momfromthenorth

Paint is a wonderful thing. We had a similar situation but had to get the water away from the house. (We live in the south and I don't want to do anything that will possibly attract termites.) So I painted the downspout the same color as the pillar. No one ever even noticed it after that.

Where it joined the bricked area along the foundation, I painted that section of downspout a brown color so it would "fade" into the brick. Now one noticed it after that.

Then I joined a round pvc pipe to the where the water came out because I wanted that water far away from the foundation. Spray painted the pvc pipe brown also and it ended up being covered by pine straw that is in the garden area.

Water shoots out onto the driveway and gets carried away. End of problem and the gutters do their job nicely.

    Bookmark   May 26, 2014 at 12:38AM
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